Recent Reviews

Academic Exercises by K. J. Parker

reviewed by Katherine Farmar

29 October 2014

Parker has a fascination with the nuts and bolts of life, both literally and metaphorically; the minute descriptions of how things are made give Parker's world a solidity and a complexity that most fantasy writers cannot hope to achieve.

Echopraxia by Peter Watts

reviewed by Matt Hilliard

27 October 2014

Watts's fiction is too thoughtful and, frankly, too dour to traffic in human exceptionalism.

Things We Found During the Autopsy by Kuzhali Manickavel

reviewed by Sofia Samatar

24 October 2014

A key feature of this collection, and of weird fiction in general, is that it both stimulates and frustrates the desire to interpret.

Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes

reviewed by Alix E. Harrow

22 October 2014

Fear is 99.9% about expectation. And Beukes owns expectation.

The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine

reviewed by Phoebe North

20 October 2014

The Girls as the Kingfisher Club is many things: fairy tale; historical novel; speculative tale. But above all, this is love story.

Widow's Dozen by Marek Waldorf

reviewed by David Hebblethwaite

17 October 2014

Widow's Dozen's very title hints at incompleteness, and that's exactly what we get in its eleven stories and the spaces between them.

All Those Vanished Engines by Paul Park

reviewed by Nina Allan

15 October 2014

If there were any justice in the literary world, Paul Park's most recent novel would win every prize going in 2015, and no matter on what side of the literary/genre divide they cast their particular net.

The Southern Reach Trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer

reviewed by Adam Roberts

15 October 2014

Southern Reach are strange pastoral.

J by Howard Jacobson

reviewed by Gautam Bhatia

13 October 2014

Jacobson's novel fits snugly into a genre that he is supposedly a newcomer to.

My Real Children by Jo Walton

reviewed by Alix E. Harrow

10 October 2014

This is a book about the deeply human fear of time's winged chariot.

Smiler's Fair by Rebecca Levene

reviewed by Liz Bourke

08 October 2014

Three-quarters of this book is prologue.

Tigerman by Nick Harkaway

reviewed by Chris Kammerud

06 October 2014

Tigerman by Nick Harkaway freely steps into and out of the panels of comics, letting the literature of superheroes inform the characters, structure, and theme of the narrative, while still maintaining a large amount of realism.

Archived Reviews

View older reviews in our Archive, thanks to the kindness of our authors who allow us to keep their material online.