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Displaying 29 results:

Scores, by John Clute (8/11/14)
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Paul as a whole is divided into three Parks. Also his book.
Once More, With Feeling: A Belated Response, by Jaymee Goh (6/30/14)
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Last year, after Steampunk III: Steampunk Revolution  came out, acclaimed SF critic John Clute wrote a review that bounced from the essay that editor Ann VanderMeer graciously had me rewrite for inclusion into the anthology.
Scores, by John Clute (6/16/14)
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The final pages hit some notes of epiphany, like a wave out of Hokusai, before etherealizing into calligraphics of transcendence.
Scores, by John Clute (4/21/14)
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It may be best to stay our gaze on Lagoon as though it were telling us a today to grasp.
Scores, by John Clute (12/16/13)
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The dominant American SF tradition has tended, by conflating change and redemption, precisely to succumb to the pathetic fallacy: hence the gated-community garden-suburb Gaias we've gotten so used to encountering in those Hard SF manuals for the privileged that we still sometimes get tricked into reading.
Scores, by John Clute (10/14/13)
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Stripped of the staged performance of industrial-humanities citing practice imposed on good academics like Andrew Milner, Locating Science Fiction turns out to be something of a revelation.
Scores, by John Clute (7/29/13)
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"[Christopher Priest is] a cardsharp who has done the ten thousand hours, who has been polishing his rhadamanthan load-bearing voice for nearly fifty years until it is fit for the task of bearing us through dismemberment."
Scores, by John Clute (5/20/13)
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It is not easy—it should really no longer be feasible—to write a tale set in the twentieth century that is not a tale about the twentieth century.
Scores, by John Clute (3/18/13)
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These books are like mother killdeer who, in order to defend their young, drag fake broken wings across the sightlines of the tale to keep us from eating the frail hatchling.
Scores, by John Clute (1/7/13)
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The best Steampunk tales (for this reader) are those which expose the gears of the world, just as though our masters had not betrayed us, and then break the gears, because of course the gears of the world, on exposure, prove to have been broken or (which is the same thing for humans) made invisible.
Scores, by John Clute (10/22/12)
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The perplex is the twentieth century: trying to describe the past as though it were real, to anatomize the frog that was galvanized into Frankenstein without succumbing to the Whig fallacy that Gary Shteyngart was an inevitable improvement upon Hugo Gernsback
Scores, by John Clute (7/30/12)
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It has been a long week for zoologicals.
Scores, by John Clute (5/21/12)
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The heart of a Sheckley story is how it ends.
Scores, by John Clute (3/26/12)
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The coat of many colours stained out of uplifted genres that automates a novel like´┐ŻAngelmaker seems to mask, in Harkaway's case, some Horror of True Sight.
Scores, by John Clute (1/30/12)
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The pure modernist extremism of Kafka is to show us a world without bling.
Scores, by John Clute (11/14/11)
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But if it is a stricture to suggest that apophasis-ridden SF texts are time-wasters (I do mean to suggest that), then Wilson and Gregory are exempt.
Scores, by John Clute (8/15/11)
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It does now seem absolutely clear that any story of the fantastic set upon this planet in the twenty-first century either deals with where we live, or sucks vacuum. So when I saw the words "Urban Fantasy" in the titles of the two compilations under review, a slim hope dawned.
Scores, by John Clute (6/20/11)
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A few weeks ago I left London and entered the future again.
Scores, by John Clute (4/25/11)
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Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blew sand in my face.
Scores, by John Clute (2/28/11)
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I think I smell homework.
Scores, by John Clute (1/17/11)
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It's too bad equipoise sounds so much like a noun.
Scores, by John Clute (11/8/10)
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1940 is not to be alternated with.
Scores, by John Clute (9/20/10)
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It is dreadful to be here at last, here at the zero moment of history that lasts forever, now that Satan has finally touched down after aeons of fall, it is hell.
Scores, by John Clute (8/9/10)
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Rajaniemi's brilliant first novel is more device than story.
Scores, by John Clute (6/28/10)
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The secret of Robert A. Heinlein and Cory Doctorow is that they think SF is true.
Scores, by John Clute (5/17/10)
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The first thing that comes to mind on reading Ajvaz is story. But maybe that is what this reviewer always says.
Scores, by John Clute (4/5/10)
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If the Library of America hoped that Straub would be able to prestidigitate a canon out of the noise of Postwar, they were clearly wrong. They will have to be content with a superb anthology whose contents do not hold up.
Scores, by John Clute (2/22/10)
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Peter Straub is a very well-known figure, with strong tastes, and the task he has undertaken in this very conspicuous and very sizeable (though not perhaps quite sufficiently vast) enterprise is a delicate one.
Scores, by John Clute (1/18/10)
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Every telling exposes (or tries to hide) a teller responsible for the tale.