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11/24/14

Estrangement and Cognition, by Darko Suvin
Article.
In this chapter, I will argue for an understanding of SF as the literature of cognitive estrangement. This definition seems to possess the unique advantage of rendering justice to a literary tradition which is coherent through the ages and within itself, yet distinct from nonfictional utopianism, from naturalistic literature, and from other non-naturalistic fiction. It thus makes it possible to lay the basis for a coherent poetics of SF.
The Strange Horizons Book Club: Tigerman, by Niall Harrison, Maureen Kincaid Speller, and Aishwarya Subramanian
Article.
This month we are discussing Nick Harkaway's third novel, Tigerman.
Movements: Towards Change, by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
Change. It’s been on my mind a lot these days.
You Are Here, by Bogi Takács
Poetry.
With each moment, the baseline of your memories shifts
Podcast: November Poetry, by Jane Crowley, Erik Amundsen, Rose Lemberg, Valya Dudycz Lupescu, and Bogi Takács, read by Romie Stott, Ciro Faienza, Valya Dudycz Lupescu, and Julia Rios
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, guest editor Ciro Faienza presents poetry from the November issues.

11/17/14

Once, Upon a Lime, by E. Catherine Tobler
Fiction.
Once, upon a lime, there was a frog.
She Commands Me and I Obey part 2 of 2, by Ann Leckie Illustrated by Tory Hoke
Fiction.
The noise rose. Qefahl Brend seemed paralyzed in his seat. The novice next to Her-Breath-Contains said, "She can't do that! Can she do that?" Meanwhile, Ultimately-Justice strolled unconcerned to the center line, looked at Seven-Brilliant-Truths, and gently, sweetly, smiled.
Podcast: Once, Upon a Lime, by E. Catherine Tobler, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents E. Catherine Tobler's "Once, Upon a Lime."
Podcast: She Commands Me and I Obey part 2 of 2, by Ann Leckie, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Ann Leckie's "She Commands Me and I Obey (part 2 of 2)."
The Mermaid of Lincoln Park Lagoon, by Valya Dudycz Lupescu
Poetry.
Mine is not a beautiful hunger.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Mirror Empire by Kameron Hurley, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Wednesday: Bête by Adam Roberts, reviewed by Andy Sawyer


11/10/14

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
That a vessel of story so packed with story it seems to overflow with plenitude can feel half-empty after we shut the last page may be a central clue to what David Mitchell has been doing in The Bone Clocks in order to tell sooth; or not. A clue would be good.
A Moon for the Unborn, by Indrapramit Das
Fiction.
Every night around 1 a.m. Earth-clock, I'd see the shadows of the camp's dead children on the windows as they walked by in silent single-file.
She Commands Me and I Obey part 1 of 2, by Ann Leckie
Fiction.
She wore no jewels, only the short trousers of a ball player and an undecorated armguard that covered her from wrist to elbow, her hand curled into a fist to hold it in place. She wasn't jumping or crouching, only standing, her arms at her side, her head tilted just slightly, as though she were listening to a voice only she could hear.
Podcast: A Moon for the Unborn, by Indrapramit Das, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Indrapramit Das's "A Moon for the Unborn."
Podcast: She Commands Me and I Obey (part 1 of 2), by Ann Leckie, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Ann Leckie's "She Commands Me and I Obey (part 1 of 2)."
The rivers, the birchgroves, all the receding earth, by Rose Lemberg
Poetry.
my hare-heavy boat tilting into summer / all the way to the dry shore and the joyful leap
Salamander Song, by Rose Lemberg and Emily Jiang
Poetry.
my body burnished scales, a shawl of sparks over a story I have never told.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Blood of Angels by Johanna Sinisalo, reviewed by Nina Allan
Wednesday: We Are All Completely Fine by Daryl Gregory, reviewed by Carmen Maria Machado
Friday: The Peripheral by William Gibson, reviewed by Z. Irene Ying


11/3/14

A Few Questions About the Culture: An Interview with Iain Banks, by Jude Roberts
Article.
These interviews were conducted by email between April and June in 2010 as part of my PhD on the Culture, drawing on the extraordinary way Banks's writing investigates and interrogates language, the body, the relationship between the self and society and the relationship between the self and the other, to consider what it is to be a person.
Me and Science Fiction: Problematic Chocolate, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
I haven't been reading enough books lately, so I joined a local fantasy book discussion group.
That's Entertainment, by Meda Kahn
Fiction.
There was silence as they set up the webcam. Gilly and ten other residents, bobbing and flapping and milling around, in wheelchairs or out, crutches and canes, a regular freakshow. Gilly turned to the rest of them with hawk's eyes, fierce and focused. "If they're going to do this to us," she said, "we might as well make them pay."
Podcast: That's Entertainment, by Meda Kahn, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Meda Kahn's "That's Entertainment."
Brass, by Erik Amundsen
Poetry.
We should find a heaven / and if it isn't, a city of brass
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Darkling Sea by James L. Cambias, reviewed by Maria Velazquez
Wednesday: Song of the Sea, reviewed by Raz Greenberg
Friday: Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis, reviewed by Lila Garrott


10/27/14

Enchanting Places: Readers and Pilgrimage in the Novels of Diana Wynne Jones, by Catherine Butler
Article.
Readers have always been fascinated by the relationship between writers and the places that are important to them.
The Strange Horizons Book Club: Ombria in Shadow, by David Hebblethwaite, Erin Horáková, Chris Kammerud, and Audrey Taylor
Article.
Welcome to the first instalment of the Strange Horizons book club! On the fourth Monday of each month, we'll be posting a round-table discussion about a speculative work (or work of interest to readers of SF), and we invite you join us for further conversation in the comments. This month we're discussing Ombria in Shadow by Patricia A. McKillip.
Because I Prayed This Word, by Alex Dally MacFarlane
Fiction.
I saw a city, Perrette longs to say. The most incredible city. I want to step under its gleaming gold roofs and I want you to step alongside me—
Podcast: Because I Prayed This Word, by Alex Dally MacFarlane, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Alex Dally MacFarlane's "Because I Prayed This Word."
Incendiaries, by Jane Crowley
Poetry.
the window closed, the sheets too close
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Echopraxia by Peter Watts, reviewed by Matt Hilliard
Wednesday: Academic Exercises by K. J. Parker, reviewed by Katherine Farmar
Friday: Tyrannia and Other Renditions by Alan DeNiro, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp


10/20/14

Dream Cakes, by Kelly Jennings
Fiction.
The recipe was never the same twice. Often Ella was not precisely aware of what she mixed into the cakes. Oh, rice flour, certainly. Well-beaten egg. Coconut milk. Honey. Spices—cardamom, or ginger, a ghost of anise, a drift of salt.
Podcast: Dream Cakes, by Kelly Jennings, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Kelly Jennings's "Dream Cakes."
Seeds, by M Sereno
Poetry.
I am afraid of forests. I do not know why / the pineapple has a thousand eyes.
Podcast: September/October Poetry, by Eric Otto, Yoon Ha Lee, Pamela Manasco, Saira Ali, Catherine Butler, Penny Stirling, and M Sereno, read by Anaea Lay, Ciro Faienza, Emily Jiang, Romie Stott, Julia Rios, and M Sereno
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, guest editor Ciro Faienza presents poetry from the September and October issues.
Cloud Wall, by Arkady Martine
Poetry.
It was the new year / and you were hardly human yourself
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine, reviewed by Phoebe North
Wednesday: Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes, reviewed by Alix E. Harrow
Friday: Things We Found During the Autopsy by Kuzhali Manickavel, reviewed by Sofia Samatar


10/13/14

Communities: Color Outside the Lines, by Renay
Column.
I dedicated more time in the 1990s to downloading fanart than anything else besides fan fiction.
Santos de Sampaguitas (Part 2 of 2), by Alyssa Wong
Fiction.
I wake to the Calderone house on fire.
Podcast: Santos de Sampaguitas (Part 2 of 2), by Alyssa Wong, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Alyssa Wong's "Santos de Sampaguitas (Part 2 of 2)."
Even Robots Learn, by Penny Stirling
Poetry.
No, not aromatic. No, just single, not single-cell.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: J by Howard Jacobson, reviewed by Gautam Bhatia
Wednesday: All Those Vanished Engines by Paul Park, reviewed by Nina Allan
Friday: Widow's Dozen by Marek Waldorf, reviewed by David Hebblethwaite


Fund Drive 2014!, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
The short version is—this year, we're aiming to raise US$13,500.

10/6/14

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
This is the terror within that J cannot utter aloud but which, in Jacobson's superbly controlled unpacking of the costs of not uttering that which cannot be spoken, permeates every word.
Santos de Sampaguitas (Part 1 of 2), by Alyssa Wong
Fiction.
The dead god descends on me as I sleep, the way it did my mother the night before my conception, and my grandmother before that. Even with my dream-eyes shut, I know it's there; the weight of folded limbs on my body threatens to crush my ribs, and I can smell the wreaths of sweet sampaguita hanging from its neck.
Podcast: Santos de Sampaguitas (Part 1 of 2), by Alyssa Wong, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Alyssa Wong's "Santos de Sampaguitas (Part 1 of 2)."
Plato's Orpheus, by Catherine Butler
Poetry.
Thus I saw you tread before, more shade than man
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Tigerman by Nick Harkaway, reviewed by Chris Kammerud
Wednesday: Smiler's Fair by Rebecca Levene, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Friday: My Real Children by Jo Walton, reviewed by Alix E. Harrow


A Strange Horizons Book Club, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
A short but (hopefully) exciting announcement.

9/22/14

Intertitles: And Was Obliged to Go On Dancing: The Red Shoes and the Chastised Woman, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
At first glance, "The Red Shoes" is a story about dancing, and it's no surprise that the relatively rare screen adaptations of the story are almost exclusively dance pieces . . .
Introduction to "The Lucky Strike", by Leonard Richardson and Sumana Harihareswara
Fiction.
In the fiction writer's bag of tricks there's a surefire technique for garnering sympathy for a character: show them reading something.
The Lucky Strike, by Kim Stanley Robinson
Fiction.
Today, the first of August, there was something more interesting to watch than the usual Superfortress parade. Word was out that General Le May wanted to take the 509th's mission away from it. Their commander Colonel Tibbets had gone and bitched to La May in person, and the general had agreed the mission was theirs, but on one condition: one of the general's men was to make a test flight with the 509th, to make sure they were fit for combat over Japan.
Podcast: The Lucky Strike, by Kim Stanley Robinson, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Kim Stanley Robinson's "The Lucky Strike."
Gorgon Girls, by Saira Ali
Poetry.
There is nothing more monstrous in our gaze than a mirror.

9/15/14

The Great Detective, by Sarah Brooks
Fiction.
It was the alien that made Mayumi's Grandma into a detective. 'Not just any detective,' says Grandma. 'The Great Detective.'
Podcast: The Great Detective, by Sarah Brooks, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Sarah Brooks's "The Great Detective."
The Daemon Lover, by Pamela Manasco
Poetry.
How those bows tackled under like ice.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: This Strange Way of Dying: Stories of Magic, Desire & the Fantastic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia, reviewed by Foz Meadows
Friday: The Stonehenge Letters by Harry Karlinsky, reviewed by Nina Allan


Changes in the Reviews Department, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Abigail has, however, decided to move on, and at the end of the year will be standing down as Reviews Editor.

9/8/14

Movements: Translations, Mother Tongue, and Acts of Resistance (Part 2), by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
For some time now, I’ve been involved with the Interstitial Arts Foundation dream translation project. The thrust of this project is to see more works from non-Anglophone nations come into translation, to work together with translators, writers, and editors, and to look into funding that would cover the high cost of translations.
Never the Same, by Polenth Blake
Fiction.
When I was younger, people assumed I was nice. I knew when to smile and when to cry. They never believed it was me who stole the biscuits or set the cushions on fire. Until they ran the routine scans and I failed. Then every tear was viewed with suspicion. Every smile was cause to check for smoke. My sister was the only one who disagreed.
Podcast: Never the Same, by Polenth Blake, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Polenth Blake's "Never the Same."
Sea-Sweet, by Yoon Ha Lee
Poetry.
I bit you down / to bones
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Short Fiction Snapshot #10: "Dagon's Bargain" by Gehayi, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Wednesday: The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell, reviewed by James Smythe
Friday: Call and Response by Paul Kincaid, reviewed by Liz Bourke


9/1/14

Four Steps to the Perfect Smoky Eye, by Claire Humphrey
Fiction.
Dad bought my safekeeper from the school.  The company had some kind of booth at Parent-Teacher Night.  He gave me this box tied with a purple ribbon.  I opened it and saw the black plastic handcuff, decorated with a row of number keys and a port on the side to charge it.
Podcast: Four Steps to the Perfect Smoky Eye, by Claire Humphrey, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Claire Humphrey's "Four Steps to the Perfect Smoky Eye."
Used, by Eric Otto
Poetry.
metal body a metal body
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Madonna and the Starship by James Morrow, reviewed by Molly Katz
Wednesday: Fringe 2014, part 1, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Friday: Fringe 2014, part 2, reviewed by Erin Horáková


8/25/14

'To Keep Out Bad Things': Exploring the Wall in A Song of Ice and Fire, by Stephe Harrop
Article.
The Wall, like the men and women who inhabit and contest its surrounding landscapes, is sketched with a sharp authorial eye for the dramatic contrasts, contradictions, and paradoxes of a frontier.
A Pantheon of Madnesses, by Cory O'Brien
Poetry.
There are no leaves. There are only flies. And they notice you, noticing them.
Podcast: August Poetry, by Lisa Bellam, Jessy Randall, Charles Bane, Jr., and Cory O'Brien, read by Ciro Faienza, Julia Rios, Diane Severson Mori, and Cory O'Brien
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the August issues.


8/18/14

Cold as the Moon, by Sunny Moraine
Fiction.
Before the sun went down Daddy became a bear and ran away over the ice floes.
Podcast: Cold as the Moon, by Sunny Moraine, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Sunny Moraine's "Cold as the Moon."
A Universe Collided, by Charles Bane, Jr.
Poetry.
such play as / spawn or beer on working / days, or mouth to mouth
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Half a King by Joe Abercrombie, reviewed by Liz Bourke


8/11/14

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
Paul as a whole is divided into three Parks. Also his book.
The Air We Breathe Is Stormy, Stormy, by Rich Larson
Fiction.
In Baltic waters, gnashed by dark waves, there stood an old oil platform on rusted legs. It was populated as rigs always are, by coarse men young and strong whose faces soon overgrew with bristle and bloat. Cedric was one of these.
Podcast: The Air We Breathe Is Stormy, Stormy, by Rich Larson, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Rich Larson's "The Air We Breathe Is Stormy, Stormy."
Helmets of the Future, by Jessy Randall
Poetry.
indoor helmet / outdoor helmet
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Girl With All the Gifts by M. R. Carey, reviewed by A. S. Moser
Wednesday: Resistance by Samit Basu, reviewed by Z. Irene Ying
Friday: Memory of Water by Emmi Itäranta, reviewed by Katherine Farmart


8/4/14

Resurrection Points, by Usman T. Malik
Fiction.
And thus we practiced my first danse macabre. Sought out the nerve bundles, made them pop and sizzle, watched the cadaver spider its way across the table. With each discharge, the pain lessened, but soon my fingers began to go numb and Baba made me halt. Carefully he draped DeadBoy.
Podcast: Resurrection Points, by Usman T. Malik, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Usman T. Malik's "Resurrection Points."
Note to the Caretaker, by Lisa Bellamy
Poetry.
in our absence, please negotiate a final settlement with the mole
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Time Traveler's Almanac, edited by Ann VanderMeer and Jeff VanderMeer, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: The Race by Nina Allan, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Friday: Child of a Hidden Sea by A. M. Dellamonica, reviewed by Sarah Frost


7/28/14

The State of British SF and Fantasy: A Symposium, by Juliet E. McKenna, Kari Sperring, Nina Allan, Dan Hartland, Martin Lewis, and Maureen Kincaid Speller
Article.
The Worldcon returns to the UK this year. It seems an apt moment, therefore, to ask: what has changed in the years since 2005, and what is happening in British SF today?
Looking Forward, Looking Back: An Interview with David Kopaska-Merkel, by Romie Stott
Article.
The current president of the Science Fiction Poetry Association and longtime editor of Dreams & Nightmares weighs in on the current state of speculative poetry and whether we'll still be writing poems in 500 years.
Communities: Open at Your Own Risk, by Renay
Column.
Recently, I completed the third and last iteration of Coverage of Women on SFF Blogs project that I began in 2011.
VIMVIMRECOIL, by Heather Knox
Poetry.
It's said she gave birth to the pigs but she couldn't because her husband didn't die until she became a witch until the sea
Podcast: July Poetry, by Randi Anderson, Bogi Takács, Juan Martínez, Leslianne Wilder, and Heather Knox, read by Randi Anderson, Bogi Takács, Julia Rios, Anaea Lay, and Amelia June
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the issues.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: In Other Words, edited by Saira Ali and Julia Rios, reviewed by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Wednesday: The Way Inn by Wil Wiles, reviewed by Nina Allan
Friday: The Happier Dead by Ivo Stourton, reviewed by David Hebblethwaite


7/21/14

Witch, Beast, Saint: an Erotic Fairy Tale, by C. S. E. Cooney
Fiction.
I could’ve changed him back. The transformation spell would take research, focus, a not inconsiderable outpouring of stored magic, but in the end, it was entirely doable. Thing was, I rather liked my monster as a monster.
Podcast: Witch, Beast, Saint: an Erotic Fairy Tale, by C. S. E. Cooney, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents C. S. E. Cooney's "Witch, Beast, Saint: an Erotic Fairy Tale."
Grandmother, by Leslianne Wilder
Poetry.
We hadn't disliked the grandmother we'd had / But she was a wolf now
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Revolutions by Felix Gilman, reviewed by Alix E. Harrow
Wednesday: The Moon King by Neil Williamson, reviewed by Matt Hilliard
Friday: Salvage by Alexandra Duncan, reviewed by Phoebe North


7/14/14

Me and Science Fiction: Books and the Death of the Middle Class, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
I’m not planning to write about shopping malls, but [. . .] I am planning to write about the ways that books and art are affected by the fact that the middle class no longer has “the fucking money.”
The World Resolute, by E. Catherine Tobler
Fiction.
The trees are growing hollow here. The trees are long dead, striping the snowy land with dark shadows. The hag sits among shadows and trees alike.
Podcast: The World Resolute, by E. Catherine Tobler, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents E. Catherine Tobler's "The World Resolute."
Metamorphosis, by Juan Martínez
Poetry.
Then the hallway / turned into / a car
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Transformers: Age of Extinction, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Motherless Child by Glen Hirshberg, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Friday: No Harm Can Come to a Good Man by James Smythe, reviewed by Anne Charnock


7/7/14

Intertitles: A Million Ways to Die in the West, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
A nameless drifter has the only thing he calls his own stolen from him by a band of thieves; amid a world of lawlessness where the quickest draw makes the law, he sets out to get it back.
Chopin's Eyes, by Lara Elena Donnelly
Fiction.
In the drawing room of Franz Liszt's mistress, no one is looking at Chopin's eyes.
Podcast: Chopin's Eyes, by Lara Elena Donnelly, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Lara Elena Donnelly's "Chopin's Eyes."
A Self-Contained Riot of Lights, by Bogi Takács
Poetry.
I reach into my nose and pull out a rainbow tapeworm / as a token of goodbye
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi, reviewed by Alix Heintzman
Wednesday: Beowulf: a Translation and Commentary, together with Sellic Spell, by J. R. R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Tolkien, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Friday: Cuckoo Song by Frances Hardinge, reviewed by Lila Garrott


6/30/14

Movements: Translations, the Mother Tongue, and Acts of Resistance (Part 1), by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
I was recently at Fantasticon, which is an annual Danish convention held in Denmark, and the conversations I had over there were mostly about language and the use of language.
Once More, With Feeling: A Belated Response, by Jaymee Goh
Column.
Last year, after Steampunk III: Steampunk Revolution  came out, acclaimed SF critic John Clute wrote a review that bounced from the essay that editor Ann VanderMeer graciously had me rewrite for inclusion into the anthology.
Introduction to "Chambered Nautilus", by Aliette de Bodard
Fiction.
Élisabeth Vonarburg is a weaver of words.
Chambered Nautilus, by Élisabeth Vonarburg
Fiction.
When she realized that this time she couldn't leave, the Voyager decided to keep a diary.
Podcast: Chambered Nautilus, by Élisabeth Vonarburg, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Elisabeth Vonarburg's "Chambered Nautilus."
La Muerte, by Randi Anderson
Poetry.
The mountain watches me, / the mountain trembles up and down
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Short Fiction Snapshot #9: "A Dweller in Amenty" by Genevieve Valentine, reviewed by Benjamin Gabriel
Wednesday: Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Friday: In Your Eyes, reviewed by Raz Greenberg


6/23/14

Endings are Never Completely Endings: An Interview with Frances Hardinge, by Tom Pollock
Article.
"People are easily the most bizarre, fantastical, perverse, wonderful, unpredictable, and insanely funny thing I have ever encountered."
Breaking Rules and Broken Rulers: The Novels of Frances Hardinge, by Frances Hardinge, Farah Mendlesohn, Virginia Preston, and Niall Harrison
Article.
"I want these inconvenient people hanging around so that people have to decide what to do with them and make moral choices about them, rather than have something convenient fall on their heads. I'm not giving them, either side, an easy out—they have to clean up their mess."
Two Children, by Tendai Rinos Mwanaka
Poetry.
It is the / shadow I have always thought is in the rooms
Podcast: June Poetry, by Salik Shah, Zella Christensen, Laura W. Allen, and Tendai Rinos Mwanaka, read by Angelle Haney Gullett, Ciro Faienza, Julia Rios, and Tendai Rinos Mwanaka
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the June issues.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Afterparty by Daryl Gregory, reviewed by Niall Alexander
Wednesday: The Making of Miasma by Henry Escaya, reviewed by Z. Irene Ying
Friday: Scruffians! Stories of Better Sodomites by Hal Duncan, reviewed by Anthony Cardno


6/16/14

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
The final pages hit some notes of epiphany, like a wave out of Hokusai, before etherealizing into calligraphics of transcendence.
Storytelling for the Night Clerk, by JY Yang
Fiction.
You are most aware of building-think in bad weather. The night had brought with it a tropical depression, Typhoon Senti, but all you note of its howling winds and bullets of rain are the data readings collected by the National Archive Complex.
Podcast: Storytelling for the Night Clerk, by JY Yang, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents JY Yang's "Storytelling for the Night Clerk."
Hierarch, by Laura W. Allen
Poetry.
that old disdain, like a mourning suit or a coronet
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Questionable Practices by Eileen Gunn, reviewed by Andy Sawyer
Wednesday: The House of War and Witness by Mike Carey, Linda Carey, and Louise Carey, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Friday: The Girl in the Road by Monica Byrne, reviewed by Richard Larson


6/9/14

Overlooked Creatures from European Mythology, by S. E. Connolly
Column.
Indeed, it’s been a good few years for mythological creatures.
Rib, by Yukimi Ogawa
Fiction.
A skeleton woman was supposed to look beautiful only to those whom she had enchanted. Scaring people was only a recreation at best. What we wanted was a human's strength, and a little money to make life easier.
Podcast: Rib, by Yukimi Ogawa, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Yukimi Ogawa's "Rib."
In Cellars, Monsters, by Zella Christensen
Poetry.
so many hearts I can't tell which are yours
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Memory Garden by Mary Rickert, reviewed by Molly Katz


6/2/14

Communities: Moving Targets, by Renay
Column.
April saw the release of Captain America: The Winter Soldier, the sequel to 2011's Captain America: The First Avenger
Tomorrow, We'll Go Yak Herding, by Michelle Ann King
Fiction.
'We could learn a lot from the animals, you know. They're not worrying and fretting and thinking up doomsday scenarios, are they? No. They're just getting on with it, because they know it's all going to be okay. They're more connected to nature than we are.'
Podcast: Tomorrow, We'll Go Yak Herding, by Michelle Ann King, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Michelle Ann King's "Tomorrow, We'll Go Yak Herding."
Straw-Fitted Elephants, by Salik Shah
Poetry.
Twenty-five centuries of space / and time trapped inside a library
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Descent by Ken MacLeod, reviewed by Michael Levy
Wednesday: Green Planets: Ecology and Science Fiction, edited by Gerry Canavan and Kim Stanley Robinson, reviewed by Benjamin Gabriel
Friday: Edge of Tomorrow, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum


5/26/14

Things You Can Do With Humans: an interview with Benjanun Sriduangkaew, by Niall Harrison
Article.
"The far future grants that possibility and hope, and space opera allows for upheavals on scale larger than life—both prospects console me, and contribute to what I think of as narrative trajectories pointed toward optimism."
We Saw No Signs of Life, by Ting Gou
Poetry.
Purest thermodynamics, / they fall when cold, rise when warm, / buoyant as algae.
Podcast: May Poetry, by Ruth Jenkins, Gillian Daniels, Charis M. Ellison, and Ting Gou, read by Kat Mandeville, Gillian Daniels, Charis M. Ellison, and Ting Gou
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the May issues.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison, reviewed by Foz Meadows
Wednesday: Disability in Science Fiction: Representations of Technology as Cure, edited by Kathryn Allan, reviewed by Aishwarya Subramanian
Friday: Binary by Stephanie Saulter, reviewed by Liz Bourke


5/19/14

Me and Science Fiction: Invisible, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
These essays are personal reflections on what it is like to not find oneself in fiction or to find oneself represented badly and dishonestly, and how uncomfortable—even painful—it is to not find oneself in art.
Sarah's Child, by Susan Jane Bigelow
Fiction.
Once, I dreamed that I had a son named Sheldon, and my grief tore a hole in the fabric of the world.
Podcast: Sarah's Child, by Susan Jane Bigelow, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Susan Jane Bigelow's "Sarah's Child."
Red, by Charis M. Ellison
Poetry.
Didn't our mother tell us not to talk to strangers? / but we enter anyway / into the smell of iron.

5/12/14

Saltwater Economics (Part 2 of 2), by Jack Mierzwa
Fiction.
Anna doesn’t believe in the Salton Sea monster. She is a researcher, a scientist; she believes in rationality, in things she can count.
Podcast: Saltwater Economics (Part 2 of 2), by Jack Mierzwa, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Jack Mierzwa's "Saltwater Economics (Part 2 of 2)."
The Liar's Charm, by Gillian Daniels
Poetry.
Start small. / Tell him he is beautiful. / Tell her she is brave.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction from the Margins of History, edited by Rose Fox and Daniel José Older, reviewed by Katherine Farmar
Wednesday: Maze by J. M. McDermott, reviewed by Nina Allan
Friday: Sleep Donation by Karen Russell, reviewed by Anne Charnock


5/5/14

Movements: Brown Woman at Work, by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
I am emerging from a period of fallowness.
Saltwater Economics (Part 1 of 2), by Jack Mierzwa
Fiction.
Anna doesn’t believe in the Salton Sea monster. She is a researcher, a scientist; she believes in rationality, in things she can count.
Podcast: Saltwater Economics (Part 1 of 2), by Jack Mierzwa, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Jack Mierzwa's "Saltwater Economics (Part 1 of 2)."
Spent, by Ruth Jenkins
Poetry.
There'll be the man at the gate. / Stand back, he'll say. / There's nothing to see.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Stone Boatmen by Sarah Tolmie, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Wednesday: Under the Skin, reviewed by Andrew Marshall


4/28/14

The Diverse Editors List: a post-production essay, by Bogi Takács
Article.
In late 2013, I assembled a list of editors in the field of English-language speculative literature who belonged to underrepresented groups—all kinds of groups: ethnic, racial, sexual and gender minorities, immigrants, people with disabilities and chronic illness, and so on.
The 2013 SF Count, by Niall Harrison
Article.
Welcome to the fourth year of Strange Horizons' "SF count" of representation in reviewing.
Intertitles: The Final Frontier: The Beautiful Fatalism of Near Space, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
There are six people in space right now.
Transformations, by Kate Conover
Poetry.
Winedark—winedrunk—wineblacked-out
Podcast: April Poetry, by Wendy A. Howe, Boudreau Freret, Alex Dally MacFarlane, Neile Graham, and Kate Conover, read by Wendy A. Howe, Boudreau Freret, Amal El-Mohtar, Neile Graham, and Kate Conover
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the issues.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The 2014 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist, part 1, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: The 2014 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist, part 2, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Friday: Burial at Sea, reviewed by Martin Lewis


4/21/14

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
It may be best to stay our gaze on Lagoon as though it were telling us a today to grasp.
Pavlov's House, by Malcolm Cross
Fiction.
The brothers should not have set that revolutionary alight and thrown him from what was left of the third floor, but the revolutionaries did not fucking understand that they would never take the brothers out of the house, alive or dead, because the brothers were dogs who had been genetically engineered to kill human beings more quickly and efficiently than even the biowarfare agents could.
Podcast: Pavlov's House, by Malcolm Cross, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Malcolm Cross's "Pavlov's House."
The God of Lost Things, by Neile Graham
Poetry.
But vain hours later I'm inventing prayers of smoke and mirrors
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Short Fiction Snapshot #8: "The Days When Papa Takes Me to War" by Rahul Kanakia, reviewed by A. S. Moser
Wednesday: Sunburnt Faces by Shimon Adaf, reviewed by Paul Kincaid


Hugos 2014, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Thank you to everyone who nominated us!

4/14/14

The Final Girl, by Shira Lipkin
Fiction.
There is still no book on the particular trauma of Final Girls.
Podcast: The Final Girl, by Shira Lipkin, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Shira Lipkin's "The Final Girl."
Her Sun-patterned Eye, by Alex Dally MacFarlane
Poetry.
no foundation texts inscribed on her tall body / only her collar-bones in Shahr-e Sukhteh's dry ground
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Something More Than Night by Ian Tregillis, reviewed by A. S. Moser
Wednesday: Snowpiercer, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Friday: Mars Evacuees by Sophia McDougall, reviewed by Erin Horáková


4/7/14

Communities: Call and Answer—Fan Creation and Construction, by Renay
Column.
I've been thinking about the differences between creating fanwork and doing fan work.
Snakebit, by Amanda Downum
Fiction.
The sound of snorts and hooves tangled through Lanie's nightmares, familiar dreams of smoke and screaming. She woke with a start, sweat sticky on her neck. Beside her Merle stirred and swore.
Podcast: Snakebit, by Amanda Downum, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Amanda Downum's "Snakebit."
1991, What I Wanted, by Boudreau Freret
Poetry.
to reassemble / the pieces
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Wednesday: Philip Pullman's Grimm Tales, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Friday: Talus and the Frozen King by Graham Edwards, reviewed by Anthony Cardno


3/31/14

Me and Science Fiction: SF and Politics, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
What follows are excerpts from two reviews of science fiction that I read last December.
Introduction to "Little Faces" by Vonda N. McIntyre, by Rachel Swirsky
Fiction.
Why would sentient aliens have the same mating habits as humans? Even other great apes don’t have the same mating habits as humans. Humans don’t always have the same mating habits as humans.
Little Faces, by Vonda N. McIntyre
Fiction.
The blood woke Yalnis. It ran between her thighs, warm and slick, cooling, sticky. She pushed back from the stain on the silk, bleary with sleep and love, rousing to shock and stabbing pain.
Podcast: Little Faces, by Vonda N. McIntyre, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Vonda N. McIntyre's "Little Faces."
The Ghosts of Occupation, by Wendy A. Howe
Poetry.
I dream of women who vow / to keep their fire baskets full
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Echo by James Smythe, reviewed by Matt Hilliard
Wednesday: Europe in Autumn by Dave Hutchinson, reviewed by David Hebblethwaite
Friday: Exit Kingdom by Alden Bell, reviewed by Richard Larson


3/24/14

Reviewing the Other: Like Dancing about Architecture, by Nisi Shawl
Article.
"As the diversity of the pool of genre tales being told widens and deepens, more of us want help accessing it. Where do we find the good stuff? How do we know it's any good? This essay intends to address ways in which reviews, and thus reviewers and reviews editors, can help, rather than hinder, based on my experiences on many sides of this question."
Escaping Ethnocentricity?, by Samuel R. Delany
Article.
"But if you have a certain leaning toward a certain kind of curiosity, what starts off as a rhetorical question will, when you repeat it enough, shift genres to become a literal one: 'How could, Girard—such an amazingly good writer and such an astonishingly good thinker—say such things?'"
Inclusive Reviewing: A Discussion, by Samuel R. Delany, L. Timmel Duchamp, Fabio Fernandes, Andrea Hairston, Alex Dally MacFarlane, Sofia Samatar, and Aishwarya Subramanian
Article.
"To listen, to see—that's work. Research is important, but it can't take the place of the deep involvement in the work that I think of when we say 'compassion.'"
Litany of the Family Bean, by Gemma Files
Poetry.
God's gift. Quotidian bounty / of salt-cold sand and tide
Podcast: March Poetry, by Sandi Leibowitz, Liz Bourke, Francesca Forrest, and Gemma Files, read by Sandi Leibowitz, Liz Bourke, Ciro Faienza, and Sonya Taaffe
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the March issues.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Astra by Naomi Foyle, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: A Calculated Life by Anne Charnock, reviewed by Alix Heintzman
Friday: Reflections by Roz Kaveney, reviewed by Sarah Frost


3/17/14

Intertitles: A Thing That Lives on Tears: Goodness and Clarice Starling, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
Once, Jack Crawford called up a trainee barely old enough to rent a car, and asked her to interview the most notorious serial killer currently living, in order to catch one that was, for the moment, slightly less notorious.
The Mountain Demon's Ballad, by Nathaniel Lee
Fiction.
It was said in the town at the foot of the mountain that the demon granted wishes.
Podcast: The Mountain Demon's Ballad, by Nathaniel Lee, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Nathaniel Lee's "The Mountain Demon's Ballad."
The Peal Divers, by Francesca Forrest
Poetry.
They come for the glossolalia / Of the tongueless bells
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Orfeo by Richard Powers, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Wednesday: Strange Bodies by Marcel Theroux, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: Beacons: stories for our not so distant future, edited by Gregory Norminton, reviewed by Niall Harrison


3/10/14

Movements: Working in Dutch Genre Space, by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
I read again for the Paul Harland Prize this year.
Such Lovely Teeth, Such Big Teeth (Part 2 of 2), by Carlie St. George
Fiction.
Only Mom doesn't know about the wolf that lives across the street. The wolf moves like a man, talks like a man, picks up the paper in his boxers and drinks coffee like a man. But Reagan isn't fooled.
Podcast: Such Lovely Teeth, Such Big Teeth (Part 2 of 2), by Carlie St. George, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Carlie St. George's "Such Lovely Teeth, Such Big Teeth."
True History, by Liz Bourke
Poetry.
You say all these lies are mine?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Almost Human, reviewed by Z. Irene Ying
Wednesday: The Gospel of Loki by Joanne M. Harris, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Friday: The Arrows of Time by Greg Egan, reviewed by Andy Sawyer


3/3/14

Communities: Raise Your Voice, by Renay
Column.
Awards season began a few weeks ago, followed almost immediately by the debate about author eligibility posts for specific awards.
Such Lovely Teeth, Such Big Teeth (Part 1 of 2), by Carlie St. George
Fiction.
Only Mom doesn't know about the wolf that lives across the street. The wolf moves like a man, talks like a man, picks up the paper in his boxers and drinks coffee like a man. But Reagan isn't fooled.
Podcast: Such Lovely Teeth, Such Big Teeth, by Carlie St. George, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Carlie St. George's "Such Lovely Teeth, Such Big Teeth."
Fat Women, by Sandi Leibowitz
Poetry.
They have no hands. / They do no work
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Short Fiction Snapshot #7: "The Truth of Fact, the Truth of Feeling" by Ted Chiang, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: The Age of Ice by J. M. Sidorova, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Friday: Beyond the Rift by Peter Watts, reviewed by Foz Meadows


2/24/14

Defining Speculative Poetry: A Conversation and Three Manifestos, by Adrienne J. Odasso, Romie Stott, and Sonya Taaffe
Article.
For this special issue of Strange Horizons, our three poetry editors set out to describe their visions for speculative poetry. This is where they ended up.
Ex Machina, by Natalia Theodoridou
Poetry.
Tonight, we are [Ajax]. We die of pride by the sea.
On an Iranian Goblet, 5,000 Years Old, by Alicia Cole
Poetry.
the first green of raw / almonds
Disturbance, by Jude Alford
Poetry.
In dust-masks and coveralls, rustling, crouched / in your white forensic tent
Ekphrastic 22/The Drowning Girl, by Jenn Grunigen
Poetry.
I found seashells in my cereal this morning
The Paper Boy, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
dead teen folded on the tiny back seat
Food Diary of Gark the Troll, by Jessy Randall
Poetry.
breakfast: 70 boxes granola (no raisins)
Una Canción de Keys, by Lisa M. Bradley
Poetry.
"Cactus?" Abby shrieks. / "This isn't going to be like that weird salad, is it?"
Rehearsal for When He Wakes, by Anne Carly Abad
Poetry.
They say you will be different, / having gone through death / before preservation
The Rotten Leaf Cantata, by Rose Lemberg
Poetry.
I have never owned a crowbar.
Rebel, by Danielle Higgins
Poetry.
I hold a star in my eye and a pistol in my hand.
Podcast: February Poetry Part 1, by John Philip Johnson, Peter Chiykowski, Susan Carlson, Natalia Theodoridou, Alicia Cole, and Amal El-Mohtar, read by Diane Severson Mori, Peter Chiykowski, Kristopher Goorhuis, Kate Baker, Ciro Faienza, and Amal El-Mohtar
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the February issues of Strange Horizons.
Podcast: February Poetry Part 2, by Jenn Grunigen, Mike Allen, Jessy Randall, Lisa M. Bradley, Anne Carly Abad, Rose Lemberg, and Danielle Higgins, read by Jenn Grunigen, Mike Allen, Tina Connolly, Lisa M. Bradley, Ciro Faienza, Julia Rios, Rose Lemberg, and Clare McBride
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the February issues of Strange Horizons.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Mythic Delirium, Issue 30, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Wednesday: Stranger Still by Laura Madeline Wiseman, reviewed by Sally Deskins
Friday: Demonstra by Bryan Thao Worra, reviewed by Sofia Samatar


2/17/14

Werewolves and Wolves – Your Dad is an Alpha, by S.E. Connolly
Column.
I have a confession to make—a deep, dark, secret. I like werewolf stories.
The Suitcase Aria, by Marissa Lingen
Fiction.
I have a bit of magic I use to make sure I am only really noticed when I'm singing—so as long as I can do that, I'm safe.
Podcast: The Suitcase Aria, by Marissa Lingen, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Marissa Lingen's "The Suitcase Aria."
From the Record, by Susan Carlson
Poetry.
We are proud of the / real we have achieved.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Cultures by Ytasha L. Womack, reviewed by Sofia Samatar
Wednesday: Tropic of the Sea by Satoshi Kon, reviewed by Raz Greenberg
Friday: Empress of the Sun by Ian McDonald, reviewed by Karen Burnham


2/10/14

Lysistrata of Mars, by Tory Hoke
Fiction.
Poli sized Kay up. "No reason a girl like you can't make a living out here." Kay sized up Poli right back. "I'm not a hooker. No disrespect." "Hooker's better than homeless. Even so, there's a flyer on Tower Ten you might want to see." Poli walked on.
Podcast: Lysistrata of Mars, by Tory Hoke, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Tory Hoke's "Lysistrata of Mars."
A Spell for Rebuilding Your Lover Out of Snow, by Peter Chiykowski
Poetry.
I thought, There’s a trick to this, / finding your lover / in the record of his step
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Wolves by Simon Ings, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: The Memory Palace by Hari Kunzru, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Friday: Wake by Elizabeth Knox, reviewed by Nina Allan


2/3/14

21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus One), by LaShawn M. Wanak
Fiction.
When a spiral staircase appears in front of you, don't panic. Just know that if you place your feet on that first step, it shows commitment. You can't go back. You can only go up and up and up until you reach the very top.
Podcast: 21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus One), by LaShawn M. Wanak, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents LaShawn M. Wanak's "21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus One)."
After the Changeling Incantation, by John Philip Johnson
Poetry.
some reason to be a goose / other than just gooseness
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Red Caps: New Fairy Tales for Out of the Ordinary Readers by Steve Berman, reviewed by Anthony Cardno
Friday: The Cusanus Game by Wolfgang Jeschke, reviewed by Matt Hilliard


1/27/14

"By A Wall That Faced The South": Crossing The Border in Classically-Influenced Fantasy, by Liz Gloyn
Article.
Given the richness of fantasy writing, why begin with borders? Because they symbolise one of fantasy's central tropes, the idea of a crossing.
Me and Science Fiction: SF Poetry, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
There is a long tradition of fantastic poetry, going back to medieval romances—heck, going back to The Epic of Gilgamesh.
Roman Shade, by April Grant
Poetry.
There is no sound.  It's drawing toward us in a wave; / blackness is putting out the stars of fire.
Podcast: January Poetry, by Mari Ness, Stacie Taylor, Sharon Kretz, and April Grant, read by Julia Rios, Anaea Lay, Ciro Faienza, and Dennis M. Lane
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the January issues.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Hild by Nicola Griffith, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Wednesday: The Riddles of the Hobbit by Adam Roberts, reviewed by Katherine Farmar
Friday: The Eidolon by Libby McGugan, reviewed by Rhiannon Lassiter


The 2013 Readers' Poll, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Time for the results!

1/20/14

Intertitles: Brand New Girl: Gender Performance in Earth Girls Are Easy, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
Of all the SF comedy musicals that address gender performance, Earth Girls Are Easy is the other one.
Palimpsest, by Anders Åslund
Fiction.
They say that when neural reconstruction was new, they tested the technique on a single mind. One single mind was transferred to new bodies over and over again.
Podcast: Palimpsest, by Anders Åslund, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Anders Åslund's "Palimpsest."
Architect, by Sharon Kretz
Poetry.
My eyes grow tired of this shore. The air— / too much broom, apple, and dust.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Parasite by Mira Grant, reviewed by Anthony Cardno
Wednesday: The Book of the Dead, edited by Jared Shurin, reviewed by Aishwarya Subramanian
Friday: Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction by Jeff VanderMeer, reviewed by Alix Heintzman


1/13/14

Movements: A Poetics of Struggle (Part 2), by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
There is a powerful scene in Toni Morrison's Beloved where Baby Suggs invites children, men, and women to laugh, to dance, and to cry.
The Innocence of a Place, by Margaret Ronald
Fiction.
This marks the fundamental difference between us as historians. Robbie believes every minor detail tells part of a greater story, while I see instead the stories people make up to justify what has happened. Even when, as with East Braxton, there is nothing that can justify it.
Podcast: The Innocence of a Place, by Margaret Ronald, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Margaret Ronald's "The Innocence of a Place."
Dermatoglyphics, by Stacie Taylor
Poetry.
Later, syntax clogged and clotted, / wrecked my clean lines, pulsed / on the page distinct as inkblots. 
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Kabu Kabu by Nnedi Okorafor, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Wednesday: Earth Star by Janet Edwards, reviewed by Phoebe North
Friday: Spring in Geneva by Sylvia Kelso, reviewed by Maya Chhabra


1/6/14

Communities: Sharing Stories, by Renay
Column.
Before I was a writer, I was a young girl surrounded by men telling stories,
The Serial Killer's Astronaut Daughter, by Damien Angelica Walters
Fiction.
Twelve dead women, all with families and loved ones, and the media has decided to focus on me. No, it doesn't make sense, but it makes a hell of a headline, so they say. Most people don't remember the names of the victims anyway.
Podcast: The Serial Killer's Astronaut Daughter, by Damien Angelica Walters, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Damien Angelica Walters's "The Serial Killer's Astronaut Daughter."
The Restoration of Youth, by Mari Ness
Poetry.
He gives me sweets, / the young girl said, / her eyes watching the ground.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 2013 in Review, by Our Reviewers
Wednesday: Two Views: Drakenfeld by Mark Charan Newton, reviewed by Martin Lewis and Maria Velazquez
Friday: The Black Spider by Jeremias Gotthelf, reviewed by Rahul Kanakia


12/16/13

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
The dominant American SF tradition has tended, by conflating change and redemption, precisely to succumb to the pathetic fallacy: hence the gated-community garden-suburb Gaias we've gotten so used to encountering in those Hard SF manuals for the privileged that we still sometimes get tricked into reading.
Significant Figures, by Rachael Acks
Fiction.
That morning, at great personal risk, Stephen's waffle iron attempted to tell him something.
Podcast: Significant Figures, by Rachael Acks, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Rachael Acks's "Significant Figures."
Power Men, by Jenny Blackford
Poetry.
sharp-pointed skeletons of ancient geometric trolls
Podcast: December Poetry, by Selkie D'Isa, Liz Bourke, and Jenny Blackford, read by Julia Rios, Liz Bourke, and Ciro Faienza
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the December issues.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Short Fiction Snapshot #6: "The Insect and the Astronomer: A Love Story" by Kelly Barnhill, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: More Than This by Patrick Ness, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Friday: Dream London by Tony Ballantine, reviewed by David Hebblethwaite


12/9/13

The Mother of All Squid Builds a Library, by Ada Hoffmann
Fiction.
In the Fourth Year of the Hydra, the Mother of All Squid built a library.
Podcast: The Mother of All Squid Builds a Library, by Ada Hoffmann, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Ada Hoffmann's "The Mother of All Squid Builds a Library."
Manteia, Katabasis, by Liz Bourke
Poetry.
I dreamed of Sappho first / forgot all after, thirsting / for the poem she would become
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Doctor Sleep by Stephen King, reviewed by Phoebe North and Niall Alexander
Wednesday: S. by J. J. Abrams and Doug Dorst, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Friday: She Walks in Darkness by Evangeline Walton, reviewed by William Mingin


12/2/13

Me and Science Fiction: Thor: The Dark World, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
I am not a comic book fan, though I read plenty of them as a kid. But I am a fan of Marvel superhero movies.
Why Don't You Ask the Doomsday Machine?, by Elliott Essex
Fiction.
Every time a warlord found me, intent on my becoming their blunt instrument, a mismatched armada followed shortly after—some squabbling coalition of assorted ally species, determined to save the universe from my grasp.
Podcast: Why Don't You Ask the Doomsday Machine?, by Elliott Essex, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Elliott Essex's "Why Don't You Ask the Doomsday Machine?."
Artifacts in the Lens, by Selkie D'Isa
Poetry.
the camera loves / the butterfly she seems, in motion always, / bright, escaping reach
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: The Violent Century by Lavie Tidhar, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: Cry Murder! In a Small Voice by Greer Gilman, reviewed by Liz Bourke


11/25/13

Different Frontiers: Taking Over English, by Benjanun Sriduangkaew
Article.
"English is a global language because of colonialism. How is it ironic to address postcolonial issues in English–a language of oppression and resistance, of loss and survival–a postcolonial language?"
Datafall, by Richard Larson
Poetry.
near the village. / Old solar laptops, out of hiding
Podcast: November Poetry, by Stefanie Maclin, C. W. Johnson, Dominik Parisien, and Richard Larson, read by Julia Rios and Anaea Lay
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the November issues of Strange Horizons.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Maddaddam by Margaret Atwood, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: How the World Became Quiet: Myths of the Past, Present, and Future by Rachel Swirsky, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Friday: Ghost Spin by Chris Moriarty, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp


11/18/13

Movements: A Poetics of Struggle (Part One), by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
In a recent conversation with yet another friend, I strove to explain the frustration that lies behind the giving away of our stories to visitors to our culture.
A Secret Map of Shanghai, by Victor Fernando R. Ocampo
Fiction.
"Shanghai is a man, a perfect, Vitruvian man," she had told him, as she spread him, unblemished, on her endlessly expanding bed, "but you my sullen boy are still half-devil, half-child."
Podcast: A Secret Map of Shanghai, by Victor Fernando R. Ocampo, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Victor Fernando R. Ocampo's "A Secret Map of Shanghai."
Sand Bags, by Dominik Parisien
Poetry.
the hole is a universe deep / and   she is falling down   fracturing
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black, reviewed by Foz Meadows
Wednesday: The Lowest Heaven, edited by Anne C. Perry and Jared Shurin, reviewed by Sarah Frost
Friday: The Beautiful Land by Alan Averill, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin


11/11/13

The Mythology of Salt, by O.J. Cade
Fiction.
Makareta could not look away from the chisel and the mallet. Even the dye making, the kapara charcoal ground into dust, mixed with water and decanted into a mussel shell, could not hold her attention. The chisel – sharp and straight, the blade wide and shining – was all that she could see.
Podcast: The Mythology of Salt, by O.J. Cade, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents O.J. Cade's "The Mythology of Salt."
What the Higgs Boson Means to Me, by C. W. Johnson
Poetry.
specks of data like locusts
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: William Gibson by Gary Westfahl, reviewed by Benjamin Gabriel
Wednesday: Gemsigns by Stephanie Saulter, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Friday: The Last Man Standing by Davide Longo, reviewed by Nina Allan


11/4/13

Yuca and Dominoes, by José Iriarte
Fiction.
"We're stuck at Casa Varadero. Nobody . . ." she trails off. Ana Teresa puts a hand on her friend's arm to steady her. "Nobody ever leaves," she finishes at last.
Podcast: Yuca and Dominoes, by José Iriarte, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents José Iriarte's “Yuca and Dominoes.“
Counterpart, by Stefanie Maclin
Poetry.
We were all once you, / they confide, peering over the edge / of the dawn.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Congress, reviewed by Raz Greenberg
Wednesday: A Questionable Shape by Bennett Sims, reviewed by Sofia Samatar
Friday: Terra by Mitch Benn, reviewed by Erin Horáková


10/28/13

The Convergence Between Poetry and the Fantastic: A Conversation, by Lavie Tidhar and Shimon Adaf
Article.
"It seemed to me that in poetry I would be able to bring together the yearning for the out-of-the-ordinary, and my personal baggage—small town, Jewish lore and Hebrew language. For me the affinity between speculative writing and poetry is a fact of writing."
The Man from the Yellow Star, by Elana Gomel
Article.
The full history of Soviet Jews' love affair with science fiction is waiting to be written. Here I am only going to use some of its highlights to elucidate the conundrum of being "unlike" in the country of the "like" and to trace the gradual Jewish disillusionment with the Soviet utopia, which culminated in one of the most fantastic events of modern times: the exodus of Jews from the planet USSR.
Communities: Nontraditional Paths of Isolated Hugo Award Fans, by Renay
Column.
I've known about the Hugo Award since I was a teenager.
Memento Mori, by Richard Prins
Poetry.
Life is stiller this way.
Podcast: October Poetry, by Shweta Narayan, Marchell Dyon, Margarita Tenser, April Grant, and Richard Prins, read by Shweta Narayan, Julia Rios, Ciro Faienza, April Grant, and Richard Prins
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the October issues of Strange Horizons.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Short Fiction Snapshot #5: "Division of Labor" by Benjamin Roy Lambert, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Wednesday: Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson, reviewed by A. S. Moser
Friday: Space is Just a Starry Night by Tanith Lee, reviewed by Indrapramit Das


10/21/13

Event Horizon, by Sunny Moraine
Fiction.
Can you starve a house? I asked Zhan once, and he just spat tobacco at me and smirked. It was a stupid question and I know that now. Of course you can starve a house. You can starve anything that’s alive.
Podcast: Event Horizon, by Sunny Moraine, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Sunny Moraine's “Event Horizon.“
Ivy, by April Grant
Poetry.
Nowhere in Cambridge was there solid earth.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Parabolas of Science Fiction, edited by Brian Atteberry and Veronica Hollinger, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: The Year of the Ladybird by Graham Joyce, reviewed by Niall Alexander
Friday: Broken Homes by Ben Aaronovitch, reviewed by Andy Sawyer


10/14/13

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
Stripped of the staged performance of industrial-humanities citing practice imposed on good academics like Andrew Milner, Locating Science Fiction turns out to be something of a revelation.
Three on a Match, by Steve Berman
Fiction.
"I know a trick," the Antony whispered.  Ewan leaned in closer. "A magic trick?" "There's no other worth knowing." He handed the cigarette over. "Do you want to see it?"
Podcast: Three on a Match, by Steve Berman, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Steve Berman's “Three on a Match.“
Slouching Towards the Garden, by Margarita Tenser
Poetry.
My name an apple split in thirds, / inverted, honeycombed.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Stranger in Olondria by Sofia Samatar, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Neptune's Brood by Charles Stross, reviewed by Matt Hilliard
Friday: Crash by Guy Haley, reviewed by Anne Charnock


10/7/13

Intertitles: Ten Worlds About Ben Affleck's Batman, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
1. Ben Affleck's Batman is terrible.
The Witches of Athens, by Lara Elena Donnelly
Fiction.
There are two diners in Athens, Ohio.
Podcast: The Witches of Athens, by Lara Elena Donnelly, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Lara Elena Donnelly's "The Witches of Athens." 
How a Mermaid spends her winters, by Marchell Dyon
Poetry.
They eat the fins with butter; it tastes like lobster.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The 2013 Man Booker Prize Shortlist, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: The Legend of Broken by Caleb Carr, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Friday: Death by Silver by Melissa Scott and Amy Griswold, reviewed by Anthony Cardno


9/30/13

Splitting the Difference: A Discussion about Indian Speculative Fiction, part 1, by Anil Menon and Vandana Singh
Article.
As part of this week's issue, we asked a panel of writers, critics, academics and editors to answer some questions about Indian SF.
Splitting the Difference: A Discussion about Indian Speculative Fiction, part 2, by Anil Menon and Vandana Singh
Article.
In the second half of this week's round-table, the panel discuss their visions for Indian speculative fiction, their recommendations and influences.
Writing Speaking Dreaming: Conversations Around Tatakai, by Shweta Narayan and Strange Horizons
Article.
"My Tamil is a colonial language, just as Hindi is, just as English is. Where I am in the power balance depends on which power balance we're talking about."
Throwing Voices and Observing Transformations: An Interview with Helen Oyeyemi, by Niall Harrison
Article.
"I'm a narrative junkie with a great respect and affection for the established structure of stories, but a need (either compulsive, or worse, postmodern) to dismantle that structure, just to see what happens."
Introduction to "Runaway Cyclone" and "Sheesha Ghat", by Anil Menon and Vandana Singh
Fiction.
We have chosen two stories not as representatives of Indian speculative fiction but as interesting instances of the genre.
Runaway Cyclone, by Jagadish Chandra Bose
Fiction.
A few years ago a supernatural event was observed which rocked the scientific communities of America and Europe.
Podcast: Runaway Cyclone, by Jagadish Chandra Bose, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Jagadish Chandra Bose's "Runaway Cyclone."
Sheesha Ghat, by Naiyer Masud
Fiction.
Father must not have known that I had already heard mention of Sheesha Ghat from visitors in his house. I knew that it was the most widely known and least inhabited ghat on the Big Lake, and that a scary woman by the name of Bibi was its sole owner.
Podcast: Sheesha Ghat, by Naiyer Masud, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Naiyer Masud's "Sheesha Ghat."
Red Matty (Part 2 of 2), by Nisi Shawl
Fiction.
Now Baby Boo's plan seemed stupider than ever. Betty made up her mind. She pawed Gray Hawk's leg for attention. "Listen, I need to break a promise I shoulda never made."
Podcast: Red Matty (Part 2 of 2), by Nisi Shawl, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Nisi Shawl's "Red Matty (Part 2 of 2)"


Tatakai, by Shweta Narayan
Poetry.
mantras couldn't (sri rama rama rameti) shape me to match / the movies
Podcast: Poetry from the Strange Horizons 2013 Fund Drive, by Dominik Parisien and Bryan Thao Worra, read by Ciro Faienza and Julia Rios
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the 2013 Fund Drive and hosts a round table discussion with fellow podcast readers Julia Rios and Ciro Faienza.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Sultana's Dream by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, reviewed by Aishwarya Subramanian
Wednesday: The City of Devi by Manil Suri, reviewed by Indrapramit Das
Friday: Turbulence by Samit Basu, reviewed by Amba Azaad

9/23/13

Recentering Science Fiction and the Fantastic: What would a non-Anglocentric understanding of science fiction and fantasy look like?, by Bodhisattva Chattopadhyay
Article.
A non-Anglocentric understanding of science fiction and fantasy must open up the genre towards the dialectic of local and universal, rather than be aligned towards the one or the other.
Set Truth on Stun: Reimagining an Anti-Oppressive SF/F, by Daniel José Older
Article.
I asked a group of writers, editors and publishers to imagine in both practical and fantastical ways what the SF and fantasy community would look like if it was actively anti-oppressive.
Recent Brazilian Science Fiction and Fantasy Written by Women, by M. Elizabeth Ginway
Article.
As we shall see, these writers are well versed in the conventions of global science fiction, and while they embrace aspects of American popular culture, they generally mold its conventions to reflect Brazilian reality.
Red Matty (Part 1 of 2), by Nisi Shawl
Fiction.
She found the cat there, lying on the warm, shiny bottom of an upturned wheelbarrow. Baby Boo was the first modded animal Betty had made friends with. "I got a feelin," Betty announced. "That Matty one of us."
Podcast: Red Matty (Part 1 of 2), by Nisi Shawl, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Nisi Shawl's "Red Matty (Part 1 of 2)"
Full Metal Hanuman, by Bryan Thao Worra, illustration by Nor Sanavongsay
Poetry.
In the future, true havoc needs more / Than a mere dog for war.
The Loss, by Mari Ness
Poetry.
the constant tending, / the endless preening, the heart-loss / of each and every feather-fall
Podcast: September Poetry, by Mat Joiner, Jane Crowley, Samuel Mukete Oreh, and Mari Ness
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the September issues of Strange Horizons.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Here Be Dragons: Exploring Fantasy Maps and Settings by Stefan Ekman, reviewed by Phoebe North
Wednesday: Goldenland Past Dark by Chandler Klang Smith, reviewed by Nina Allan
Friday: Mortal Fire by Elizabeth Knox, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum


9/16/13

Me and Science Fiction: Genre Fiction, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
I read Arthur Krystal’s essay on genre fiction shortly after it came out in the October 24, 2012, issue of The New Yorker. It made me angry at the time. But I ignored it for a number of months.
Teffeu: a Book from the Library at Taarona, by Rose Lemberg
Fiction.
When my books empty out at night, they go to the library at Taarona.
Podcast: Teffeu: a Book from the Library at Taarona, by Rose Lemberg, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Lemberg's "Teffeu: a Book from the Library at Taarona"
ARIECC 1.0, by Lillian Wheeler
Fiction.
You are speaking to the Automated Road Information and Emergency Contact Computer, version one point zero. How may I help you?
Podcast: ARIECC 1.0, by Lillian Wheeler, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Lillian Wheeler's "ARIECC 1.0."
When Ever Young, by Mukete Samuel Oreh
Poetry.
Where there are tall buildings and many / Cars, the young call it the fertile jungle
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Vampires in the Lemon Grove by Karen Russell, reviewed by Chris Kammerud
Wednesday: The World of the End by Ofir Touché Gafla, reviewed by David Hebblethwaite
Friday: Terra Nova: An Anthology of Contemporary Spanish Science Fiction, edited by Mariano Villareal, reviewed by Alexandra Pierce


9/9/13

Communities: You Got Your Industry in my Fanwork, by Renay
Column.
Of all the fandoms I've been in, SF book blogging fandom is running out of fannish fourth wall—fast.
Difference of Opinion, by Meda Kahn
Fiction.
Problem is Keiya's brain never told her to paste her lips upright if she wants people to be nice. It's the IQ machine. She's been told she'd make a very good robot, all things considered.
Podcast: Difference of Opinion, by Meda Kahn, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Meda Kahn's "Difference of Opinion."
Triptych, by Jane Crowley
Poetry.
deer-hide kisses and blood in your teeth, / the thrill of the chase and stakes set steep
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: NOS4R2 by Joe Hill, reviewed by Katherine Farmar
Wednesday: Dark Waters of Hagwood by Robin Jarvis, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: Atlas: The Archaeology of an Imaginary City by Dung Kai-cheung, reviewed by Sofia Samatar


9/2/13

Movements: On Escapist Literature and Being Dangerous, by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
At Nine Worlds GeekFest, I sat on a panel called RaceFail 101 where in the space of 75 minutes we tried to unpack the question of whether we have progressed in light of issues that came to light after the many RaceFail discussions that we have had online.
You Have to Follow the Rules, by Ada Hoffmann
Fiction.
So the things Mommy could not see made as much sense as anything else.
Podcast: You Have to Follow the Rules, by Ada Hoffmann, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Ada Hoffmann's "You Have to Follow the Rules."
I Am Learning to Forget, by Dominik Parisien
Poetry.
their forked tongues can translate / days into nights, nights into days
And Deeper Than Did Ever Plummet Sound, by Mat Joiner
Poetry.
All deeps invert; / tides at last divorce the moon
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Finches of Mars by Brian Aldiss, reviewed by Maria Velazquez
Wednesday: Shattered Pillars by Elizabeth Bear, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Friday: The Blue Blazes by Chuck Wendig, reviewed by Foz Meadows


Fund Drive 2013, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Welcome to the 2013 Strange Horizons fund drive!

8/26/13

Hadaly, The First Android: Restituting the Female Body in Villiers' Tomorrow's Eve, by Tara Isabella Burton
Article.
If men are, in the world of Villiers' Edison, scientific beings, whose rationality and ability to create frees them from the strictures of the natural world, women are only ever subject to its control.
On Defining SF, or Not: Genre Theory, SF, and History, by John Rieder
Article.
The collective and accretive social process by which SF has been constructed does not have the kind of coherent form or causality that allows one to talk about origins at all.
St. Patrick and the Snakes, by Jane Yolen
Poetry.
He tells them to shut their cake-holes, / stop hissing and pissing about the ride.
Podcast: August Poetry, by Lynette Mejía, Andrew Brenza, John W. Sexton, Laura Madeline Wiseman, and Jane Yolen
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the August issues of Strange Horizons.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Short Fiction Snapshot #4: "A Visit to the House on Terminal Hill" by Elizabeth Knox, reviewed by Nina Allan
Wednesday: Sea of Ghosts by Alan Campbell, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: Black Feathers by Joseph D'Lacey, reviewed by Sarah Frost


8/19/13

Intertitles: In This Together: Duality in Two Apocalypses, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
Let's talk about the end of the world.
A Plant (Whose Name is Destroyed), by Seth Dickinson
Fiction.
Naveen's boyfriend is now certainly a god.
Podcast: A Plant (Whose Name is Destroyed), by Seth Dickinson, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Seth Dickinson's "A Plant (Whose Name is Destroyed)."
Abduction, by Laura Madeline Wiseman
Poetry.
the Midwestern winter / gone at a push of a button
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: From Mountains of Ice by Lorina Stephens, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Wednesday: Universes by Stephen Baxter and A Very British History by Paul McAuley, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Friday: The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum


8/12/13

Din Ba Din, by Kate MacLeod
Fiction.
I look down at my hands, past the dirt. Sun-darkened, wrinkled, but not loose skin on bone. I'm forty, maybe nearly fifty. This isn't the rocket launch I dread, not yet.
Podcast: Din Ba Din, by Kate McLeod, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Kate MacLeod's "Din Ba Din."
All That Her Mother Left Her, by John W. Sexton
Poetry.
a single gray pillowslip / made from sleet
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Adjacent by Christopher Priest, reviewed by Niall Alexander
Wednesday: The Queen, the Cambion, and Seven Others by Richard Bowes, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Friday: Shackleton's Man Goes South by Tony White, reviewed by Duncan Lawie


8/5/13

Me and Science Fiction: Imagining the Future, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
This is what I want to discuss in this essay: how fast the future changes these days and how difficult it is to keep up.
Complicated and Stupid, by Charlie Jane Anders
Fiction.
The doctor was a gray-haired woman with a tongue piercing and a faded bluebird tattoo on one exposed forearm. She wore a white coat over a lacy halter top and hotpants. She kept looking down Benjamin's throat with a penknife as if his malaise could be pharyngeal.
Podcast: Complicated and Stupid, by Charlie Jane Anders, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Charlie Jane Anders's "Complicated and Stupid."
my father as a sonnet on the human meaning of inhuman stars, by Andrew Brenza
Poetry.
later you were opened to sight
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Love Minus Eighty by Will McIntosh, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Wednesday: Spin by Nina Allan, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Friday: The Emperor's Soul by Brandon Sanderson, reviewed by A. S. Moser


7/29/13

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
"[Christopher Priest is] a cardsharp who has done the ten thousand hours, who has been polishing his rhadamanthan load-bearing voice for nearly fifty years until it is fit for the task of bearing us through dismemberment."
Elizabeth Ziemska and "Count Poniatowski and the Beautiful Chicken", by Charles Tan
Fiction.
The first time I encountered Elizabeth Ziemska's fiction was when her short story, "A Murder of Crows," was nominated for the 2007 Shirley Jackson Awards.
Count Poniatowski and the Beautiful Chicken, by Elizabeth Ziemska
Fiction.
Before I tell you the story he told me about his encounter with Count Stanislas August Poniatowski, the last King of Poland, I need to explain a thing or two about my father.
Podcast: Count Poniatowski and the Beautiful Chicken, by Elizabeth Ziemska, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Elizabeth Ziemska's "Count Poniatowski and the Beautiful Chicken."
A Modern Prometheus, by Lynette Mejía
Poetry.
My predecessors, / being men, / were far too rough.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Nights at the Circus by Angela Carter, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: What Lot's Wife Saw by Ioanna Bourazopoulou, reviewed by Anne Charnock
Friday: The History of Luminous Motion by Scott Bradfield, reviewed by Nina Allan


7/22/13

Stories Larger than Themselves: a conversation, by David J. Schwartz and William Alexander
Article.
"And yet sometimes I worry that fantasy—that stories in general—can also have a numbing effect. I have a tendency to cringe when people talk about fantasy as escapism; the fantasy I most enjoy is too unsettling and too questioning for that label, I think."
Evaporating Genres, by Gary K. Wolfe
Article.
The writers who contribute to the evaporation of genre, who destabilize it by undermining our expectations and appropriating materials at will, with fiction shaped by individual vision rather than traditions or formulas, are the same writers who continually revitalize genre.
The Future is a Mirror to the Past: Classical Receptions in SF at the University of Liverpool, by Liz Bourke
Column.
Swords, Sorcery, Sandals and Space was the first English-language academic conference of its kind. It invited papers on the relationship between classical antiquity and science fiction and fantasy across all media: a conference on reception studies, but a specialised one.
Reflections En Route to Orion Nebula, by Erik Goranson
Poetry.
The last kiss behind / helmet visor, gleam of top-heavy head
Podcast: July Poetry, by Sara Norja, Jennifer Ruth Jackson, Theodore Kanbe and Erik Goranson
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the July issues of Strange Horizons.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Warrior Who Carried Life by Geoff Ryman, reviewed by Matt Hilliard
Wednesday: Stardust by Nina Allan, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Friday: Big Mama Stories by Eleanor Arnason, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum


7/15/13

Communities: Beyond Traditional Horizons, by Renay
Column.
Every fandom I was in before online SF fandom was bursting with women.
Ten Cigars, by C.S.E. Cooney with illustrations by Rebecca Huston
Fiction.
They solemnly passed the cigar around, sucking the non-lit end and exhaling deeply. Only Rosa got it right. She coughed up ten butterflies right away.
Podcast: Ten Cigars, by C.S.E. Cooney with illustrations by Rebecca Huston, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents C. S. E. Cooney's "Ten Cigars."
Marceline (Adventure Time), by Theodore Kanbe
Poetry.
Although you float above the ground, you still laugh and / Write the heaviest songs
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Empty Space by M. John Harrison, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Wednesday: Life on the Preservation by Jack Skillingstead, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Friday: The Scrivener's Tale by Fiona McIntosh, reviewed by Katherine Farmar


7/8/13

In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind (Part 2), by Sarah Pinsker
Fiction.
George had only ever taken one trip without Millie, in the fall of 1951. A letter had arrived from the army asking him to fly to New Mexico.
Podcast: In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind (Part 2), by Sarah Pinsker read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Sarah Pinsker's "In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind."
Castle Csejthe (Bathory), by Jennifer Ruth Jackson
Poetry.
Six hundred fell by her hand, she who loved me.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Mending the Moon by Susan Palwick, reviewed by Ben Godby
Wednesday: Where Thy Dark Eye Glances: Queering Edgar Allan Poe, edited by Steve Berman, reviewed by Anthony Cardno
Friday: Other Seasons: The Best of Neal Barrett Jr., reviewed by Paul Kincaid


7/1/13

Paraphernalia: Last and First Fans, by Mark Plummer
Column.
I’ve been fishing around for some kind of personal fan anniversary that falls about now.
In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind (Part 1 of 2), by Sarah Pinsker
Fiction.
"What are you talking about, old man?" she asked, but he was already someplace else. He opened his mouth as if to say more, but no words came out.  
Podcast: In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind (Part 1 of 2), by Sarah Pinsker, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Sarah Pinsker's "In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind."
Wolf Daughter, by Sara Norja
Poetry.
When you found Marjatta, throat torn, / your keening chilled my heart.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Peacock Cloak by Chris Beckett, reviewed by Andy Sawyer
Wednesday: Clockwork Phoenix 4, edited by Mike Allen, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Friday: Conservation of Shadows by Yoon Ha Lee, reviewed by Richard Larson


6/24/13

Ways of Knowing: An interview with Sofia Samatar, by Nic Clarke
Article.
"What if we would start thinking of epic fantasy as a genre of contact, but not conquest? The genre is sort of built around conflict, and that's why we don't see it being done very often. Conflict is such a part of the genre that you have to address it before shifting to contact."
Science Fiction Without the Future, by Judith Berman
Article.
Without a vital link to the ever-changing Zeitgeist, SF will become a closed system where recycling subject matter and theme is all that's possible.
Movements: Looking Critically, by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
I think of how upheavals and eruptions must happen in order for us to reach that place where all of us have space to speak our words and share our stories.
Air on a G String, by Jude Cowan Montague
Poetry.
She designed labels showing cigarillos / exploited in most unusual ways
Podcast: June Poetry, by Stella Nickerson, Adriana Tosun, Alicia Cole, and Jude Cowan Montague
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the June issues of Strange Horizons.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Short Fiction Snapshot #3: "In Metal, In Bone" by An Owomoyela, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Reviver by Seth Patrick, reviewed by Foz Meadows
Friday: Solaris Rising 2, edited by Ian Whates, reviewed by Alexandra Pierce


6/17/13

Longfin's Daughters, by O. J. Cade
Fiction.
When her sisters came home, their slippers once more danced through, they found the youngest in her bed, but though her head was hidden under the pillow as usual, her hair was wet and there were bites on her thighs and a new eel for smoking.
Podcast: Longfin's Daughters, by O. J. Cade, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents O. J. Cade's "Longfin's Daughters." You can read the full text of the story, and more about O. J., here.
Once, I Was a Mermaid, by Alicia Cole
Poetry.
Often, / I see a dark fedora tumbling past me / to break against thewaves.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Unexplained Fevers by Jeannine Hall Gailey, reviewed by Lesley Wheeler
Wednesday: Emilie and the Hollow World by Martha Wells, reviewed by Phoebe North
Friday: Menial: Skilled Labor in Science Fiction, edited by Kelly Jennings and Shay Darrach, reviewed by Benjamin Gabriel


6/10/13

Intertitles: Superhuman Masculinity and the Musketeer Mythos in The Fast and the Furious, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
These movies operate under the extremely handwavey rules of what Hollywood sometimes fever-dreams comics to be like, meaning that continuity and physics are flexible, but dammit, honor never is.
Collateral Memory, by Sabrina Vourvoulias
Fiction.
Friends or not, there is one guiding rule in the game: it's got to be genuine. Like life. Real. Anything else would be a cheat. And despite all of our other differences, no one in the shed is that. Except me.
Podcast: Collateral Memory, by Sabrina Vourvoulias, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Sabrina Vourvoulias's "Collateral Memory."
Maidenhead, by Adriana Tosun
Poetry.
fall with me to the loam, / and together we will lose what / history knows nothing of
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Alteration and The Green Man by Kingsley Amis, reviewed by Nina Allan
Wednesday: A Natural History of Dragons by Marie Brennan, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: Anthology of European Speculative Fiction, edited by Cristian Tamaş and Roberto Mendes, reviewed by Katherine Farmar


6/3/13

Jinki and the Paradox, by Sathya Stone
Fiction.
"Years of erosion, that means the wind and water broke bits off the mountain along that way," he pointed east. "And brought them down here, to be dust." / "What mountains?" / "They're gone now," said Mr. Quest. "Eroded. You can see them if you look through Time."
Podcast: Jinki and the Paradox, by Sathya Stone read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Sathya Stone's "Jinki and the Paradox."
Again, Pygmalion, by Stella Nickerson
Poetry.
she made a man of cardboard and children's salt clay, / pressed in two green pennies for his eyes
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Best of All Possible Worlds by Karen Lord, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: The Disestablishment of Paradise by Phillip Mann, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Friday: Scourge of the Betrayer by Jeff Salyards, reviewed by Nathaniel Katz


5/27/13

Me and Science Fiction: Fan Fiction, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
My fannish creds are pretty solid, though I haven't written fan fic for more than forty years.
And the War is Never Over, by Shira Lipkin
Poetry.
I've taken hits for all of us for years; / haven't I?
Podcast: May Poetry, by Jane Tolmie, Perry Rath, Cassandra de Alba, Qyn and Shira Lipkin read by Julia Rios, Cassandra de Alba, Ciro Faienza and Anaea Lay
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the May issues of Strange Horizons.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes, reviewed by Jesse Bullington and Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Errantry: Strange Stories by Elizabeth Hand, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Friday: The Curve of the Earth by Simon Morden, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro


Non-fiction News, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
A brief articles hiatus, a new focus, and editorial changes.

5/20/13

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
It is not easy—it should really no longer be feasible—to write a tale set in the twentieth century that is not a tale about the twentieth century.
Hiding on the Red Sands of Mars (Part 2 of 2), by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
Tyson was suddenly very absorbed in the deer carcass he was dressing. "You were fathered by the revolution. I'd have stepped in anyway, but Harry... your mother knew better."
Podcast: Hiding on the Red Sands of Mars (Part 2 of 2), by Anaea Lay read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Julia Rios presents part two of Anaea Lay's "Hiding on the Red Sands of Mars."
Ophelia, by Qyn
Poetry.
From here she thinks she sees / the ghost of her mother, / mouthing silence like / some great and beautiful fish.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Deprivation by Alex Jeffers, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Wednesday: River of Stars by Guy Gavriel Kay, reviewed by Indrapramit Das
Friday: The Lives of Tao by Wesley Chu, reviewed by Karen Burnham


5/13/13

Hiding on the Red Sands of Mars (Part 1 of 2), by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
"While we were on our way, when Mars was still a tiny ball in the distance, I plucked it out of the sky and rolled it between my hands to warm it up for us. Just like I do for you when you get cold."
Podcast: Hiding on the Red Sands of Mars, by Anaea Lay read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Julia Rios presents Anaea Lay's "Hiding on the Red Sands of Mars."
the houses of girl-ghosts, by Cassandra de Alba
Poetry.
altars everywhere: pyrite, half-melted candles, music boxes / missingteeth.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Utopia, Season 1, reviewed by Matthew Jones
Wednesday: Zenn Scarlett by Christian Schoon, reviewed by Foz Meadows
Friday: Queen Victoria's Book of Spells, edited by Ellen Datlow and Terry Windling, reviewed by Gabriel Murray


5/6/13

Movements: So what do you think of my story where I made use of another person’s culture?, by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
I’ve recently spent a lot of time listening to conversations and engaging in discussions about, among other things, non-western SF and how SF is so white.
Hear the Enemy, My Daughter, by Kenneth Schneyer
Fiction.
Now Kesi is four and does not mention him at all. She remembers him; when I point to his picture, she tells me who Jabari is. But she does not begin conversation about him. She does not ask when he will return. She does not ask what it means to die.
Podcast: Hear the Enemy, My Daughter, by Kenneth Schneyer read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Kenneth Schneyer's "Hear the Enemy, My Daughter."
Book of Vole (Excerpts), by Jane Tolmie and Perry Rath
Poetry.
Literature is open to everybody, / even pests.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Adam Robots by Adam Roberts, reviewed by Andy Sawyer
Wednesday: Necessary Ill by Deb Taber, reviewed by Maria Velazquez
Friday: The Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke, reviewed by Matt Hilliard


4/29/13

Lucy Sussex and "My Lady Tongue", by Tansy Rayner Roberts
Fiction.
First, I discovered the genres of science fiction and fantasy.  Then, maybe a year or two later, I discovered that Australians wrote it too.
My Lady Tongue, by Lucy Sussex
Fiction.
I was minding my own business, thinking of Honey, but cat curious I followed the groups of womyn drifting towards the clamour.  It was only when I was in the main square that I realised the offence was mine.  Ah well, I’d brazen it out—I’m nothing if not brazen.
Podcast: My Lady Tongue, by Lucy Sussex, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Lucy Sussex's "My Lady Tongue."
That Sonnet Is a Fragment (Anagrammatic) of Constellation, by Sophie Mayer
Poetry.
walls fall, nightmare / papier maché melts to let in something stranger
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The 2013 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist, Part 1, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: The 2013 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist, Part 2, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Friday: No Return by Zachary Jernigan, reviewed by Martin Lewis


4/22/13

Noticing Language: An Interview with Rose Lemberg, by Julia Rios
Article.
"What is my canonical narrative, what are the issues important to me, who are the people I am writing about? How do their different identity concerns intersect?"
The 2012 SF Count, by Niall Harrison
Article.
We surveyed reviews coverage in 14 SF magazines and journals published in the US and the UK: Analog; Asimov's; Cascadia Subduction Zone; F&SF; Foundation; Interzone; Locus; The New York Review of Science Fiction; The SF Site; Science Fiction Studies; SFX; Strange Horizons; Tor.com; and Vector.
Loving the Alien: David Bowie's History of Science Fiction Film, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
In David Bowie's most recent music video for "The Stars Are Out Tonight," directed by Floria Sigismondi, he and Tilda Swinton play outwardly content suburban marrieds whose darker sides emerge in the fantastical faces of their rock-star mirror-selves, undergoing a mutation from the conventional to the alien, and confronting the transformative trap (and trappings) of fame.
Three Visions Seen from Upside-Down, by Alexandra Seidel
Poetry.
But she has one Nourn eye / and it does never sleep
Podcast: April Poetry, by Jenn Grunigen, Bryan D. Dietrich, Robert Frazier and Alexandra Seidel, with Ciro Faienza and Julia Rios as additional readers
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the April issues of Strange Horizons.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Short Fiction Snapshot #2: "Boat in Shadows, Crossing" by Tori Truslow, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Two Views: The Story Until Now: A Great Big Book of Stories by Kit Reed, reviewed by Paul Kincaid and Chris Kammerud
Friday: Queen of Nowhere by Jaine Fenn, reviewed by Liz Bourke


4/15/13

REG and Alter Leave The Couch, by Mark Plummer
Column.
Richard E. Geis died on 4 February in Portland, Oregon. He was 85.
The Siren, by Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam
Fiction.
She thought of the ocean, and suddenly she felt a longing for it. She saw herself wading into patches of light, into the crisp foam like her father's shaving cream.
Podcast: The Siren, by Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam's "The Siren."
The Mutant Forests of Mars, by Robert Frazier
Poetry.
But on the terraformed red dirt plains of Mars / Historical references are lost on the colonists
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Rapture by Kameron Hurley, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Trafalgar by Angélica Gorodischer, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Friday: The Twyning by Terrence Blacker, reviewed by Ben Godby


4/8/13

Road Test, by Lane Robins
Fiction.
This was her city, damn it, and no johnny come lately warlock was going to take it from her. No matter how cute.
Podcast: Road Test, by Lane Robins, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Lane Robins's "Road Test."
The Monster Learns How to Read, by Bryan D. Dietrich
Poetry.
he had an eye for it, death, for knowing / what chains meant, and fairies, and fire
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Best of Joe Haldeman, edited by Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe, reviewed by A. S. Moser
Wednesday: The Testimony by James Smythe, reviewed by Nina Allan
Friday: Futuredaze: An Anthology of YA Science Fiction, edited by Hannah Strom-Martin and Erin Underwood, reviewed by Karen Burnham


4/1/13

The Lucia Bird, by Ryan Simko
Fiction.
It is the highest sin to kill a Lucia bird.
Podcast: The Lucia Bird, by Ryan Simko read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Ryan Simko's "The Lucia Bird."
Tattertongue, by Jenn Grunigen
Poetry.
What did you see? / birch bark, ribs— / Did you cry? / salt cod—
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Accursed by Joyce Carol Oates, reviewed by Gabriel Murray
Wednesday: Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire, reviewed by Foz Meadows
Friday: A Pretty Mouth by Molly Tanzer, reviewed by Katherine Farmar
Nomination, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Strange Horizons is nominated for a Hugo!


3/25/13

Not Just Vast Armies Clashing on Dark Plains at Night: An Interview with Ken Liu, by Luc Reid
Article.
Many of my stories deal with the invisible bounds imposed on us by the legacy of history: colonialism, war, mass killings, power imbalances between different parts of the world and between different populations sharing the same space.
Irony, Man: An Interview with Adam Roberts, by Christos Callow Jr.
Article.
"I think that a writer, or any artist, needs to find ways of messing up their own finished product, dirtying it a bit, making it a bit less clean. There's a necessary uncleanness in art. And there's something of that in puns"
Origin, by Heather Sommer
Poetry.
What of the squid? (Ink in drams.) / The starfish? (Constellation compassed.)
Podcast: March Poetry, by read by Anaea Lay
Poetry.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the March issues of Strange Horizons.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Explorer by James Smythe, reviewed by Richard Larson
Wednesday: AfroSF, edited by Ivor W. Hartmann, reviewed by Maria Velazquez
Friday: The Rise of Ransom City by Felix Gilman, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum


3/18/13

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
These books are like mother killdeer who, in order to defend their young, drag fake broken wings across the sightlines of the tale to keep us from eating the frail hatchling.
A to Z Theory, by Toh EnJoe
Fiction.
Nowadays, this amazing theorem is held to be incorrect, in terms of even elementary mathematics. Hardly anybody ever even thinks about it anymore, because it�s just plain wrong.
A to Z Theory, by Toh EnJoe read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
Nowadays, this amazing theorem is held to be incorrect, in terms of even elementary mathematics. Hardly anybody ever even thinks about it anymore, because it’s just plain wrong.
Schrödinger's Tree, by Madeline Sebastian Burtenshaw
Poetry.
There is no shade in summer, / no autumn nut-gathering.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Folly of the World by Jesse Bullington, reviewed by Indrapramit Das
Wednesday: Dark Eden by Chris Beckett, reviewed by Rahul Kanakia
Friday: Wolfhound Century by Peter Higgins, reviewed by Nina Allan
The 2012 Readers' Poll, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
You voted—here are the results.


3/11/13

Me and Science Fiction: Hope for the Future, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
But there are limits to dark fiction.  We need to face reality, but we also need to imagine ways to change reality.
Town's End, by Yukimi Ogawa
Fiction.
For five years in the city I worked as a receptionist at an English language school, where I had to deal with countless, groundless complaints and had developed a Noh-mask on my face devoid of any real expression. But even that was nothing to fight against this.
Podcast: Town's End, by Yukimi Ogawa read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
For five years in the city I worked as a receptionist at an English language school, where I had to deal with countless, groundless complaints and had developed a Noh-mask on my face devoid of any real expression. But even that was nothing to fight against this.
Bang, by Stefon Mears
Poetry.
Maybe then the Buddha / would come and save me from the zombies.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, reviewed by Gabriel Murray
Wednesday: Science Fiction: The 101 Best Novels, 1985-2010 by Damien Broderick and Paul Di Filippo, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: Confessions of a Five-Chambered Heart by Caitl�n R. Kiernan, reviewed by Nathaniel Katz


3/4/13

Movements: Woman's Work and Woman of Color at Work, by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
The first time I was asked to write a bio for publication, I felt it was important to say that I was a Filipina writer. At that time, I could not put words to the reason behind that decision.
I Have Placed My Sickness Upon You, by Karin Tidbeck
Fiction.
"This is your new treatment," said Dr. Andersson. "It's the latest in experimental therapy."
I Have Placed My Sickness Upon You, by Karin Tidbeck read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
"This is your new treatment," said Dr. Andersson. "It's the latest in experimental therapy."
A Glance Across the Ballroom, by Ada Hoffmann
Poetry.
More birds peck at your eyes / than ever flocked round a cinder bed.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Zero and Other Fictions by Huang Fan, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: When We Wake by Karen Healey, reviewed by Sarah Frost
Friday: Metal Hurlant Chronicles, reviewed by Raz Greenberg


2/25/13

"Write Your Heart Out": An Interview with Nalo Hopkinson, by Sofia Samatar
Article.
Take your fear and your preconceptions of what editors will and won't publish. Squish them down into a tiny troll kitten, small enough to fit in the palm of your hand.
The Haunting of Delphi, by Darja Malcolm-Clarke
Poetry.
it's for me / that each girl, each crone / casts aside the Bright One
February Poetry, by Alex Dally MacFarlane, Amal El-Mohtar, Nancy Hightower and Darja Malcolm-Clarke, read by Anaea Lay, Julia Rios and Amal El-Mohtar
Poetry.
This week's podcast features the poetry from the February issues of Strange Horizons. 
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Short Fiction Snapshot #1: "Intestate" by Charlie Jane Anders, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Hair Side, Flesh Side by Helen Marshall, reviewed by Nina Allan
Friday: The Time Ship by Enrique Gaspar, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Introducing Short Fiction Snapshot, by Abigail Nussbaum
Editorial.
Introducing a new reviews department feature.


2/18/13

The Clover Still Grows Wild in Wawanosh, by Kelly Rose Pflug-Back
Fiction.
Some of those ashes are the burnt-up bones of the men and women and little kids trapped inside after the bombs, and back when the compound was still at the ruins, sometimes I'd find pieces of bone in the ash I brought out for the gardens.
Podcast: The Clover Still Grows Wild in Wawanosh, by Kelly Rose Pflug-Back read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
Some of those ashes are the burnt-up bones of the men and women and little kids trapped inside after the bombs, and back when the compound was still at the ruins, sometimes I'd find pieces of bone in the ash I brought out for the gardens.
Jael, by Nancy Hightower
Poetry.
his mother, far away, / felt the breeze of my hand as it came down.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Receptionist and Other Tales: Poems by Lesley Wheeler, reviewed by Sally Rosen Kindred
Wednesday: Nexus by Ramez Naam, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Friday: Lois McMaster Bujold: Essays on a Modern Master of Science Fiction and Fantasy, edited by Janet Brennan Croft, reviewed by Liz Bourke


2/11/13

Paraphernalia: Where the Ether Vibrates, by Mark Plummer
Column.
A general sense of solidarity obliges me to note that the recently resurrected online incarnation of Amazing Stories features a similarly resurrected fan column, “The Clubhouse.”
The Long Road to the Deep North, by Lavie Tidhar
Fiction.
Like the first Bashō, this one, too, had worn and discarded names with each stage of his journey through life, at last taking on the name of a living tree and a dead poet.
Podcast: The Long Road to the Deep North, by Lavie Tidhar read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
Like the first Bashō, this one, too, had worn and discarded names with each stage of his journey through life, at last taking on the name of a living tree and a dead poet.
Lost, by Amal El-Mohtar
Poetry.
a pillow of moss, a bed of leaves, / a presence out of absence.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Crossing by Mandy Hager, reviewed by Phoebe North
Wednesday: Town of Shadows by Lindsay Stern, reviewed by Ben Godby
Friday: The Heretic Land by Tim Lebbon, reviewed by Jesse Bullington


2/4/13

Intertitles: Hell Here: Catwoman and the Superhero Origin Tragedy, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
The origin story is a pretty tough gig.
Live Arcade, by Erik Amundsen
Fiction.
i don't have to, do i? No game had ever asked the kid not to play before. The kid couldn't tell Murr that, though. Play or don't play.
Podcast: Live Arcade, by Erik Amundsen, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Erik Amundsen's "Live Arcade."
Tadi, by Alex Dally MacFarlane
Poetry.
a woman in a bird-mask, / a man in a bird-mask, / dancing across the chive-sweet land
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Fractal Prince by Hannu Rajaniemi, reviewed by Tori Truslow
Wednesday: That Book Your Mad Ancestor Wrote by K. J. Bishop, reviewed by Sofia Samatar
Friday: Tears in Rain by Rosa Montero, reviewed by David Hebblethwaite


1/28/13

Reading the Game, by Kyla Ward
Article.
What was frightening becomes amusing, even nostalgic, as general familiarity grows. What emerged on the edges of society migrates towards the center, as students graduate and having been a "nerd" or "dork" begins to pay off.
Straw Man, by Sandi Leibowitz
Poetry.
Don't use me long, / expect too much, / for I'm light-of-mind, / a harum-scarum fellow
Podcast: January Poetry, by Lisa Bao, Karen Weyant, Crystal Hoffman and Sandi Leibowitz read by Julia Rios, Anaea Lay, and Ciro Faienza
Poetry.
Don't use me long, / expect too much, / for I'm light-of-mind, / a harum-scarum fellow
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Dog Stars be Peter Heller, reviewed by Nina Allan
Wednesday: Slow Apocalypse by John Varley, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Friday: The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker, reviewed by A. S. Moser


1/21/13

Me and Science Fiction: Writing What You Don�t Know, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
Science fiction is (in part) about escaping from the here and now, but when it's good, it's based on reality and experience.
Dysphonia in D Minor, by Damien Walters Grintalis
Fiction.
There were buildings in the capitol city said to be her creations, towering things of arches and alcoves, rooms that swallowed up every sound, every heartbeat.
Podcast: Dysphonia in D Minor, by Damien Walters Grintalis read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
There were buildings in the capitol city said to be her creations, towering things of arches and alcoves, rooms that swallowed up every sound, every heartbeat.
Heat and Sainthood, by Crystal Hoffman
Poetry.
Dragons were not quite so fearsome then, / their fire breath keeping stories soft / like an ironworker's blast furnace.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Fairy Tales From the Brothers Grimm by Philip Pullman, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Wednesday: Bullettime by Nick Mamatas, reviewed by Jesse Bullington
Friday: The City's Son by Tom Pollock, reviewed by Martin Lewis


1/14/13

Movements: Retrieving Our Hidden Histories, by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
It is a struggle encountered by all of us who live in the diaspora, by those of us who have known what it means to be colonized, and by all of us who understand that there are not enough words in the English language to express the pain and the sorrow of loss.
Inventory, by Carmen Maria Machado
Fiction.
"I'm the dad, and you're the mom," she said. I pulled up my shirt, she pulled up hers, and we just stared at each other. My heart fluttered between my legs, but I worried about daddy longlegs and her parents finding us. I still have never seen Jurassic Park. I suppose I never will.
Podcast: Inventory, by Carmen Maria Machado, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Carmen Maria Machado's "Inventory".
Watching for Aliens over the Allegheny, by Karen Weyant
Poetry.
When she looked for their tracks, / she could only find pawprints of a large dog.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 2312 by Kim Stanley Robinson, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: Wreck-It Ralph, reviewed by Raz Greenberg
Friday: The Last Policeman by Ben H. Winters, reviewed by Rahul Kanakia


1/7/13

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
The best Steampunk tales (for this reader) are those which expose the gears of the world, just as though our masters had not betrayed us, and then break the gears, because of course the gears of the world, on exposure, prove to have been broken or (which is the same thing for humans) made invisible.
Selkie Stories Are for Losers, by Sofia Samatar
Fiction.
I hate selkie stories. They�re always about how you went up to the attic to look for a book, and you found a disgusting old coat and brought it downstairs between finger and thumb and said �What�s this?�, and you never saw your mom again.
Podcast: Selkie Stories Are for Losers, by Sofia Samatar, read by Anaea Lay
Fiction.
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Sofia Samatar's "Selkie Stories Are for Losers".
In the Courts of the Khan, by Lisa Bao
Poetry.
songbirds will sing to / a spring river falling / through the forest's hair.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Blackwood by Gwenda Bond, reviewed by Maya Chhabra
Wednesday: Year Zero by Rob Reid, reviewed by Matt Hilliard
Friday: The Ravenglass Eye by Tom Fletcher, reviewed by Niall Alexander


12/31/12

Grooming Wagner's Neckbeard, by Thomas M. Ingram
Article.
The Ring of the Nibelung is a cycle of four music dramas written and composed by Richard Wagner. They break with the German operatic tradition by eschewing the populist influence of Italian opera—instead of clearly defined sections with hummable tunes, they proceed without interruption except for act breaks. All told, the whole thing can be more than fourteen hours long (depending on tempo), spread out over four consecutive nights. Right there is an obvious commonality with epic fantasy: Wagner is constitutionally incapable of concision.
Fairy Beekeeper, by Adrienne J. Odasso
Poetry.
You did not know me / from either inhabitant of Eden
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Point of Knives by Melissa Scott, reviewed by Michael Levy
Wednesday: 2012 in Review, by Our Reviewers
Friday: Jagannath by Karin Tidbeck, reviewed by Indrapramit Das


12/17/12

Paraphernalia: Anniversary Drinks [2], by Mark Plummer
Column.
1937 was quite a year for the nascent British science fiction community.
Wing, by Amal El-Mohtar
Fiction.
She reads—not the book around her neck, which is small, only as long and as wide as her thumb, black cord threaded through a sewn leather spine, knotted shut.
End Times, by Sarah Terry
Poetry.
Fairly certain, yes, end times. / Yes, and somehow somewhat anticlimactic.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Wonders of the Invisible World by Patricia A. McKillip, reviewed by Chris Kammerud
Wednesday: Rocket Science, edited by Ian Sales, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Friday: Constellation Games by Leonard Richardson, reviewed by Duncan Lawie


12/10/12

Intertitles: Cloud Atlas, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
Making a film about Greatness is awfully tricky work.
America Thief (Part 2 of 2), by Alter S. Reiss
Fiction.
"The kid can turn lead into gold," I said. "But it's not balanced."
The Beetle Horde, by James Valvis
Poetry.
Ah, the beetles, / this planet's dominant species, / six feet in height when standing upright.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Robot and Frank, reviewed by Raz Greenberg
Wednesday: Gothic High-Tech by Bruce Sterling, reviewed by Paul Graham Raven
Friday: Every Day by David Levithan, reviewed by Sara Polsky


12/3/12

America Thief (Part 1 of 2), by Alter S. Reiss
Fiction.
Bugsy wasn't going to kill me that night, because while they thought I was crazy for thinking I could do magic, sometimes people needed me to do magic for them.
The Gardener's Theory of Cultivation, by Garrett Ashley
Poetry.
We open our skulls, pull out the emptiness / Where a brain should be, / Fill the dark cavity with thick, slick dirt.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Bad Glass by Richard E. Gropp, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Wednesday: Silent Hill: Revelation 3D, reviewed by Benjamin Gabriel
Friday: Shoggoths in Bloom by Elizabeth Bear, reviewed by Rahul Kanakia


11/26/12

Cooking the Books: The Roundtable , by Fran Wilde
Article.
"It�s tough to be able to think of good food in science fiction. I seem to be mostly impressed with the bad food."
The Three Immigrations, by Rose Lemberg
Poetry.
and I learned / to speak; made up three languages to hide in
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Crysanthe by Yves Meynard, reviewed by Maria Velazquez
Wednesday: Three Parts Dead by Max Gladstone, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Friday: Channel Sk1n by Jeff Noon, reviewed by Rhiannon Lassiter


11/19/12

Me and Science Fiction, by Eleanor Arnason
Column.
Since this is my first essay for Strange Horizons, I thought I�d begin with a history of my relationship to science fiction.
The Hateful Brilliance of His Eyes, by Alec Austin
Fiction.
This fragment, recovered from the archives at Tian Jing, is the only surviving account of the deeds of Captain Liao Jun and the Celestial Ascension during their exile in barbarian lands.
Machine Guns Loaded with Pomegranate Seeds, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
A thousand Persephones lie bleeding in the Lethe
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter, reviewed by Niall Harrison and Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Nod by Adrian Barnes, reviewed by David Hebblethwaite
Friday: Permeable Borders by Nina Kiriki Hoffman, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro


11/12/12

Movements: Identity and the Indigenous Spirit, by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
Column.
In the last line of the poem No, I am not Yours, Barbara Jane Reyes (a Filipino-American poet) writes, �No, I am not anything that is anything I am not.�
He Reminds Us, by Jennifer Linnaea
Fiction.
The premier landscape artist of the century tells me that the light is wrong. He tells me we'll have to come back tomorrow.
Tamar, by Nancy Hightower
Poetry.
still, i plan to take the lion by the mane / and wrestle him till dawn
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Sorry Please Thank You: Stories by Charles Yu, reviewed by Matt Denault
Wednesday: Birds and Birthdays by Christopher Barzak, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Friday: The Grass King's Concubine by Kari Sperring, reviewed by Sarah Frost


11/5/12

Paraphernalia: The Time Traveller, by Mark Plummer
Column.
APAs, Amateur Press Associations, are not a fan creation, with early examples in both the USA and the UK dating back to the late nineteenth century.
Four Kinds of Cargo, by Leonard Richardson
Fiction.
The Captain had spent her childhood watching bad native-language dubs of those same epics, except the implication that all this stuff was fiction had been lost in translation. When she came of age, the Captain (probably not her birth name) had bought Sour Candy with Mommy's money, hired a crew, and declared herself a smuggler.
The Murder of Dionysos, by Florence Major
Poetry.
The wine spills burning, firebirds / fly from my cup.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Cloud Atlas, reviewed by Gabriel Murray
Wednesday: Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Friday: Outlaw Bodies, edited by Lori Selke and Djibril al-Ayad, reviewed by Tori Truslow
Podcasts and pay rises, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
The result of this year's fund drive—pay rises for poems and reviews, and free fiction podcasts starting in 2013!

11/2/12

Household Management, by Ellen Klages
Fiction.
He is, perhaps, the worst tenant in all of London.

10/31/12

The Architect of Snow, by Michele Bannister
Poetry.
origami-intricate flowers of fractal petals / blooming into blackness under slow cosmic-ray rain.

10/29/12

Intertitles: The Persistence of Memory: Cinematic Time Travel in the Surreal, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
The thing is, a time travel movie is pretty much always surreal.
Introduction to M. R. James's "Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad", by Brit Mandelo
Fiction.
Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad, by M. R. James
Fiction.
"Well," Parkins said, "as you have mentioned the matter, I freely own that I do not like careless talk about what you call ghosts."
Good Hunting (part 2 of 2), by Ken Liu
Fiction.
"I dream of hunting in this jungle of metal and asphalt," she said. "I dream of my true form leaping from beam to ledge to terrace to roof, until I am at the top of this island, until I can growl in the faces of all the men who believe they can own me."
After, Ever, by Caitlin O'Brien
Poetry.
The boys turn into swans and fly away.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Gravity Falls, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Wednesday: The Constantine Affliction by T. Aaron Payton, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Friday: The Woman Who Married a Cloud: The Collected Short Stories of Jonathan Carroll, reviewed by Nina Allan
Strange Horizons Needs You!, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Here we are already, in the final week of this year's fund drive.

10/23/12

Better Dead than Red: Politics and Genre, by Daniel M. Kimmel
Article.
Science fiction movies rarely focus on how we select our leaders or the processes we employ, but when they do touch on politics and government, they can help us understand the power of the individual citizen to make a difference.

10/22/12

A Dragon in the Time Machine: The Gross Anatomy of Horror, by Nicholas Seeley
Article.
Since the savanna, we have been afraid. The question is not what we fear, or even why.... The question is what our fears tell us about ourselves.
Scores, by John Clute
Column.
The perplex is the twentieth century: trying to describe the past as though it were real, to anatomize the frog that was galvanized into Frankenstein without succumbing to the Whig fallacy that Gary Shteyngart was an inevitable improvement upon Hugo Gernsback
Torah and Secular Learning, by Bogi Takács
Poetry.
You can see through the world / and soon you will fall, burning
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Looper, reviewed by William Mingin
Wednesday: The Evolution of Inanimate Objects by Harry Karlinsky, reviewed by David Hebblethwaite
Friday: Black Bottle by Anthony Huso, reviewed by Dan Hartland


10/16/12

All the Mari's Parties, by Mat Joiner
Poetry.
Your past rides her onto the next house, and the next

10/15/12

The Lord of Discarded Things, by Lavie Tidhar
Fiction.
There were still alte-zachen men in Jaffa and Central Station in those days, as there always were and always will be, and chief amongst them was Ibrahim, he who was sometimes called The Lord of Discarded Things.
Sea Change, by Kathrin Köhler
Poetry.
Never forget the weight of you / as I dragged you from the waves
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Earth Girl by Janet Edwards, reviewed by Phoebe North
Wednesday: The Broken Kingdoms and The Kingdom of Gods by N. K. Jemisin, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Friday: The Croning by Laird Barron, reviewed by Niall Alexander


10/9/12

Good Hunting (part 1 of 2), by Ken Liu
Fiction.
A hulijing cannot resist the cries of the man she has bewitched.

10/8/12

In the Library of Souls (part 2 of 2), by Jennifer Mason-Black
Fiction.
"You didn't cry," she said. "Ten years old and your mother had died, and you cared more for the books."
Invocabulary, by Gemma Files
Poetry.
Nevertheless, I refuse / to spit into your food
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Osiris by E. J. Swift, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: Be My Enemy by Ian McDonald, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Friday: Starboard Wine: More Notes on the Language of Science Fiction by Samuel R. Delany, reviewed by T. S. Miller


10/1/12

In the Library of Souls (part 1 of 2), by Jennifer Mason-Black
Fiction.
I was first called by a book long ago, before the thousand days of rain began.
I Understand Video Games Aren't Real, by Leslie Anderson
Poetry.
One night I watched my boyfriend play videogames. / I was unsure of him, still. I suspected / he would hurt or ignore me soon.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Eternal Flame by Greg Egan, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Wednesday: At the Mouth of the River of Bees by Kij Johnson, reviewed by Dan Hartlan
Friday: Ancient, Ancient by Kiini Ibura Salaam, reviewed by Richard Larson
Looking Back, Looking Forward, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Welcome to the 2012 Strange Horizons fund drive!

9/24/12

Rage Against the Machine: How Colossus: The Forbin Project May Predict the Real Life Future of Artificial Intelligence, by Cynthia C. Scott
Article.
Based on the novel by British author Dennis Feltham, Colossus: The Forbin Project is a cautionary tale about what happens when people build bigger, better mousetraps (well, somebody's got to be the mouse).
Violet's Hearts, by Jeanie Tomasko
Poetry.
At eight, she started cutting the hearts in / less-than-perfect shapes. Sometimes she cut a small tail on top of the heart. She told her father it / was the superior vena cava.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Seven Wonders by Adam Christoper, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Wednesday: The Map of Time by Félix J. Palma, reviewed by Nathaniel Katz


9/17/12

The Fourth Exam, by Dorothy Yarros
Fiction.
Even those who failed the fourth exam knew too much; bits and pieces that were just enough to get an occasional response to an authentication question past the processing offices.
Cave Bear Dreams, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
Suspended through the twilight centuries, / our bodies take in little, give back less
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: vN by Madeline Ashby, reviewed by Marina Berlin
Wednesday: Stormdancer by Jay Kristoff, reviewed by Matt Hilliard


9/10/12

Paraphernalia: Do the Chicken Dance, by Mark Plummer
Column.
I�m sure my estimable editors haven�t done this to me deliberately, so I will not be too despondent that my deadline for delivery of this fan column is 27 August, the day I fly to Chicago for this year�s World Science Fiction Convention. Inevitably its publication date is sometime after the convention has concluded.
The Grinnell Method (part 2 of 2), by Molly Gloss
Fiction.
There were dozens of black oystercatchers dead and dying on the wet mud. The birds not yet dead beat their long wings weakly against the ground and made faint yelping sounds, ghostlike and plaintive.
In the High Places, by Gemma Files
Poetry.
You have chosen the wrong king / between two kings, the wrong / love, between two loves
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Salsa Nocturna by Daniel José Older, reviewed by Nina Allan
Wednesday: Rituals by Roz Kaveney, reviewed by Sarah Frost


9/3/12

The Grinnell Method (part 1 of 2), by Molly Gloss
Fiction.
It was her brother Tom, ten years older, who had started her in the business of collecting birds' nests, Tom who had taken her into the woods and fields, a small child, and told her the names of flowers, birds, trees, how to catch and mount butterflies and insects.
La Dame à la licorne, by Rebekah Curry
Poetry.
It slept while she dreamed of a millefleur forest / and the end of the story by a pomegranate tree
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Face Like Glass by Frances Hardinge, reviewed by Hallie O'Donovan
Wednesday: Lost Everything by Brian Francis Slattery, reviewed by Chris Kammerud


8/27/12

Steven Spielberg's Early Television Genre Works , by Raz Greenberg
Article.
An examination of Spielberg's early television works can go a long way in explaining how his filmmaking career remains successful and relevant to this very day. He signed his first contract with Universal's television department in 1969, and while his "New Hollywood" peers were busy experimenting with new forms of storytelling and exploring the dark sides of American life on the screen, Spielberg learned how to work with run-of-the-mill scripts, producers and executives.
Sister Philomela Heard the Voices of Angels, by Megan Arkenberg
Poetry.
Their voices were blood coughed out on whiteness.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Beasts of the Southern Wild, reviewed by Matt Denault
Wednesday: Faith by John Love, reviewed by Katherine Farmar


8/20/12

The Bear with the Quantum Heart, by Renee Carter Hall
Fiction.
And when I said hello and asked what my name was, she didn't hesitate. "Bear-Bear!" she proclaimed, and so I was.
Corpus, by Lila Garrott
Poetry.
Is it enough to claim I am your daughter?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Three Science Fiction Novellas by J.-H. Rosny aîné, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Wednesday: The Troupe by Robert Jackson Bennett, reviewed by Guria King


8/13/12

Intertitles: Girl Wonder: Lawn Dogs, Hard Candy, and the Age of Innocence, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
Intelligent beyond her years, more sympathetic to adults than her peers, and positioned at the center of an otherwise-adult world, comes the enduring cinematic image of the girl wonder: the young woman on the verge of adolescence who seems to have extraordinary, even supernatural, qualities simply by virtue of what she is.
Over the Waves, by Louise Hughes
Fiction.
Rain had fallen overnight and Campbell's boat wouldn't start.
Give Me Pluto, by Alexandra Seidel
Poetry.
I want no hymns, no smoke, I do not even want / your love
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Radiant Days by Elizabeth Hand, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Isles of the Forsaken by Caroyln Ives Gilman, reviewed by Sofia Samatar


8/6/12

Zero Bar, by Tom Greene
Fiction.
The doctor thinks she knows what's going on--with the father's race, I mean. She must see a lot of women with something to hide.
The Golden Line of the Horizon, by Sofía Rhei
Poetry.
She wanted to reach the golden line of the horizons / to make a bow from it
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Mongoliad: Book One by Neal Stephenson, Greg Bear, Mark Teppo, E. D. deBirmingham, Erik Bear, Joseph Brassey, and Cooper Moo, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Wednesday: Some Kind of Fairy Tale by Graham Joyce, reviewed by Ben Godby


7/30/12

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
It has been a long week for zoologicals.
Introduction to "The Death of the Duke", by Jed Hartman
Fiction.
I fell for Richard and Alec before I knew I was bi.
The Death of the Duke, by Ellen Kushner
Fiction.
A little later, he sighed in his sleep, and spoke the name of his first wife, while he held her. She felt her heart twist and turn over, close to the child she carried, so that there was room for little inside her but pain and love.
Sisters, by Mari Ness
Poetry.
our hands filled / with bread and dates. / Our knives tremble / in our sleeves.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Courier's New Bicycle by Kim Westwood, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Bitterblue by Kristin Cashore, reviewed by Sara Polsky
Friday: The Apex Book of World SF 2, edited by Lavie Tidhar, reviewed by Ben Godby


7/23/12

Twilight of the Batman: 25 Years of "The Dark Knight Returns", by Matthew Jackson
Article.
A quarter century after its release, The Dark Knight Returns remains a psychologically and thematically complex tale honed into a bullet of visceral energy, and at its heart is Frank Miller�s demand that the reader confront an aging, obsessive and violent Batman, and walk with him into darkness.
Paraphernalia: Exceptional, by Mark Plummer
Column.
Some years ago, Chris Garcia experienced a moment.
Lost Letter, by Sofia Samatar
Poetry.
the first time the snow came we thought it was a werewolf
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Iron Sky, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Wednesday: Sharps by K.J. Parker, reviewed by Nathaniel Katz
Friday: Communion Town by Sam Thompson, reviewed by Nina Allan


7/16/12

Feed Me the Bones of Our Saints (part 2 of 2), by Alex Dally MacFarlane
Fiction.
It is beautiful. It catches Jiresh, so bright a green and covered in the tales of Nishir and Aree, carved in the shapes of stone-stories and tail-stories.
The End of Scheherazade, by Nancy Sheng
Poetry.
Once there was a girl, and her death. / Her death lived with her all her days.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Intrusion by Ken MacLeod, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: The Killing Moon by N.K. Jemisin, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Friday: Blue Magic by A. M. Dellamonica, reviewed by Tori Truslow


7/9/12

A Boy and His Ghosts: From the Red Telephone to Red Dawn: Imagining the Apocalypse, by Jeremy L. C. Jones
Column.
The apocalypse is one phone call, one siren, one descending vapor trail or mushroom cloud away. I am terrified by that simple fact. I am also fascinated by it.
Feed Me the Bones of Our Saints (part 1 of 2), by Alex Dally MacFarlane
Fiction.
Once, we knew more stories than there were stars to follow and admire at night. We wrote them in the desert for fun. What we have lost since that time is immeasurable.
Kepler's Music, by Alexandra Seidel
Poetry.
and what of Tycho? Every orbit / an ellipse and one of two centers flaringly bright.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Of Blood and Honey and And Blue Skies from Pain by Stina Leicht, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Wednesday: Death Sentences by Kawamata Chiaki, reviewed by Nina Allan
Friday: The Folded World by Catherynne M. Valente, reviewed by Maya Chhabra
Renewal, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Today we can confirm the final shape of the new fiction editing team.


7/2/12

Comes the Huntsman, by Rachael Acks
Fiction.
I was never brave or mad enough to fly from a bridge. I should never have been mad enough to eat that apple.
Between the Mountain and the Moon, by Rose Lemberg
Poetry.
Oh, I've been waiting for long years, polished my sleeves against the night; / Counting bloodbeats, shaman-hands against the earthskin of my ribs.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: In the House of the Seven Librarians by Ellen Klages, reviewed by Sofia Samatar
Wednesday: Avatar: The Legend of Korra, Season 1, reviewed by Raz Greenberg


6/25/12

Going Beyond the Other Side of the Eye: An Interview with Bryan Thao Worra, by Yuk Ki Lau
Article.
If Asian Americans can�t talk about our history in even that briefest of art forms, poetry, how can we expect others to? How would I face my grandchildren in the future to tell them we couldn�t spare even a few words in a bit of verse about our journey, what we thought and what we dreamed?
Bone China, by David Sklar
Poetry.
Only the living can taste it, / but after you've had it you're hers.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson, reviewed by Michael Levy
Wednesday: Time and Robbery by Rebecca Ore, reviewed by Sarah Frost
Friday: Paradise Tales by Geoff Ryman, reviewed by T.S. Miller


6/18/12

Dice and D-Pads: Funding Fun, by Robyn Fleming
Column.
Now and then, when I'm complaining about a game being sexist or racist or something, someone will suggest that if I'm that interested in getting better games out there, I should make my own. This always kind of makes me giggle.
Elsewhere, by Benjamin Rosenbaum
Fiction.
Much of what was timelike for Unlike Themselves was spacelike for Not Very; in addition, their ontologies were skew, so it was difficult to converse. We all know how difficult it is, to live together across incommensurability.
Callisto to Ganymede, by Melissa Frederick
Poetry.
You sad, charmed boys / think toting Chardonnay's a dream, / but Jove still fucks you in your sleep.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Deadfall Hotel by Steve Rasnic Tem, reviewed by Ben Godby
Wednesday: Necropolis by Michael Dempsey, reviewed by Richard Larson


6/11/12

Intertitles: Putting Out Fires with Gasoline: The Sexuality of Cat People, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
Every so often, Hollywood's ceaseless remake grinder accidentally turns out an incarnation which is both a hilariously dated product of its time and a film actually in conversation with its predecessor.
The Keats Variation (part 2 of 2), by K. M. Ferebee
Fiction.
With his eyes closed he could draw the human body, stripped down to skeleton or muscle, reduced to what anatomy he knew. This much he understood about that body: what made it up, what composed it. He looked at his own fist clenched about the pen as he drew.
Hold Fast, by Leah Bobet
Poetry.
and these scarred arms, this scarred / heart does not send men to Hell.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Liminal People by Ayize Jama-Everett, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Wednesday: Boneyard by Kristine Kathryn Rusch, reviewed by Alexandra Pierce
Friday: The Black Opera by Mary Gentle, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum


6/4/12

Paraphernalia: Into and Out of Time's Abyss, by Mark Plummer
Column.
The Selhurst Triangle lacks the mystical and paranormal associations of its better known Bermudan relative.
The Keats Variation (part 1 of 2), by K. M. Ferebee
Fiction.
You would not believe, Barrie said, you would not believe how much blood is in a man. Keats was quite ready to believe it. He believed most things at this time. He had come, at the credulous age of thirteen, from the country, where men did not tell so many lies, or they were a different sort of lies, not fat distended fancies like soap bubbles that rise from a washer-man's wand and swell and swell the expanse of their shining hollow bodies till they burst and you are left with just a thin wet sour residue.
Returning Song, by Adrienne J. Odasso
Poetry.
Our sin / is the folly of Sappho, the grief / of Alexander.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 2312 by Kim Stanley Robinson, reviewed by Ernest J. Yanarella
Wednesday: The Games by Ted Kosmatka, reviewed by Indrapramit Das
Friday: The Dragon Griaule by Lucius Shepard, reviewed by Matthew Cheney


5/28/12

The Swedish Invasion: An Interview with Karin Tidbeck, by Dustin Monk
Article.
We spend a lot of time in twilight, which is a liminal condition, a no-man's land. The light has an eerie and melancholy quality. I suppose this has carried over into my writing as well, both in the sense of the eerie and melancholy, but also the sensation of having stepped sideways into another world where the sun has stopped in its course.
A Boy and His Ghosts: The House on Delaware Street, by Jeremy L. C. Jones
Column.
In March, my 8-year-old daughter, Molly, asked me if I believed in ghosts.
Sky-shaping, by Michele Bannister
Poetry.
(all the kindness of Tāne; leaf-shadow and branch-shiver, fern-frond unfolded)
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Sacred Band by David Anthony Durham, reviewed by Matt Hilliard
Wednesday: Blue Remembered Earth by Alastair Reynolds, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Friday: The Drowned Cities by Paolo Bacigalupi, reviewed by Andrew Liptak


5/21/12

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
The heart of a Sheckley story is how it ends.
Tiger Stripes, by Nghi Vo
Fiction.
"Everything that I should be afraid of has already happened," she said to the tiger, "and what I have to fear does not come from tigers any more."
Scene I, graveyard, by Rachael Jennings
Poetry.
Their / corpses suck our marrow through / root-arms, wanting something they / think we have.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Avengers, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Hitchers by Will McIntosh, reviewed by William Mingin
Friday: Krabat by Otfried Preußler, reviewed by Erin Horáková


5/14/12

Lexias: Lexia, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
This is my final Lexias column, the last in a series that began some fifty columns ago with my first, "Walls," on February 7, 2005.
Beside Calais, by Samantha Henderson
Fiction.
One of the éoles reared on its back wheel at their approach, spreading its ungraceful wings and spinning its propeller: a dominant male, getting their scent. The flock stopped grazing for a second, and the low hum of their engines quickened as they readied for the signal to take off.
Not the Home World, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
Next year, / We'd be all over time, / And kick their trans-temporal heinies / Back to the middle of next week.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Sea Hearts/The Brides of Rollrock Island by Margo Lanagan, reviewed by Sofia Samatar
Wednesday: Angelmaker by Nick Harkaway, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: Planesrunner by Ian McDonald, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp


5/7/12

Dice and D-Pads: Playing with Emotion, by Robyn Fleming
Column.
People sometimes ask me if I think games can be art, to which I usually respond—with persuasive eloquence—by saying, "Well, yeah. Duh."
Bright Lights, by Robert Reed
Fiction.
It is immediately apparent who is useful here and who must be sacrificed.
Neuschwabenland, by John Zaharick
Poetry.
She wanted vast water, sealed / for aeons under thick glaciers.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Hunger Games, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Wednesday: The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories, edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Friday: A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness, reviewed by Phoebe North


4/30/12

Intertitles: "Do Not Wither/Look at Me": Feminist Identity as Supernatural in Orlando and I am Dina, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
One of the handiest things about speculative fiction is its ability to provide shorthand for an exploration of the human condition.
Introduction to "The Gods of Reorth", by Debbie Notkin
Fiction.
My fondness for "The Gods of Reorth" is born both of the story and of the cultural context in which it appeared.
The Gods of Reorth, by Elizabeth A. Lynn
Fiction.
Jael remembered years of famine, of drought, of blight. Once she had sent a plague. It had hurt, watching the inexorable processes of disease and death sweep over her people. She had not asked reasons for that.
The Second Law of Thermodynamics, by David Barber
Poetry.
The mower cable�s puzzled into knots again / and somewhere, out of sight, a spider freezes / as that dropped screw rolls to a halt.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Dangerous Waters and Darkening Skies by Juliet E. McKenna, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Wednesday: The Drowning Girl: A Memoir by Caitlín R. Kiernan, reviewed by Niall Alexander
Friday: The Freedom Maze by Delia Sherman, reviewed by Hallie O'Donovan
Welcome to Julia Rios, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of announcing Brit Mandelo as one of our new fiction editors. This week, I'm delighted to announce that she's being joined by Julia Rios.

4/23/12

Airships - Not just flying billboards, by Ann Wilkes
Article.
Airships are soaring from the pages of steampunk novels and the imaginations of young engineers and entrepreneurs into our skies. Welcome to the airship renaissance.
Foam, by Selena Martens
Poetry.
unrequited love's a pain / you could drown the ocean in.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: In the Mouth of the Whale by Paul McAuley, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: The Books of the Raksura: The Cloud Roads and The Serpent Sea, by Martha Wells, reviewed by Matt Denault
Friday: Artemis by Philip Palmer, reviewed by Martin Lewis


4/16/12

Beneath Impossible Circumstances, by Andrea Kneeland
Fiction.
Analise wants to have a baby. A real baby. I tell her that if we had a baby together, it would be a real baby. It would be a real baby and it would have parts from both of us, and it would be a real person made from both of our genes.
From the House of Dionysos, by Virginia M. Mohlere
Poetry.
You rose up, lord, / and stretched me transparent: / feet inside Greek earth, / herb-maddened head back home.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The 2012 Arthur C. Clarke Shortlist, Part 1, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: The Arthur C. Clarke Shortlist, Part 2, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Friday: The Magician King by Lev Grossman, reviewed by Bill Mingin


4/9/12

Area 54 (Part 2 of 2), by Hunter Liguore
Fiction.
The look in Daddykins's eyes that had been gone for so long returned, and with it came regular surveillance of the night sky.
Kandinsky's Galaxy, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
The calming void / came to him each time he closed his eyes
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Straight Razor Cure/Low Town by Daniel Polansky, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Wednesday: A Glass of Shadow by Liz Williams, reviewed by Maria Velazquez
Friday: The Last Letter by Fiona Lehn, reviewed by Sarah Frost


4/2/12

Lexias: The Fact of a Fiction of a Fact, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
If you've encountered any mention of The Lifespan of a Fact by John D'Agata and Jim Fingal, you've probably heard that it's about one guy (D'Agata) who wrote an essay about a teenager who killed himself in Las Vegas, and another guy (Fingal) who was hired to fact-check that essay and discovered that a lot of it was made up.
Area 54 (Part 1 of 2), by Hunter Liguore
Fiction.
Daddykins and I both had cigarettes, but his were the brown-paper kind and mine were candy stick, or sometimes the gum kind, though Daddykins said the gum kind were bad because the Skylings might hear me chew. He said they had super-duper equipment that could hear human hairs falling from the hairbrush. I was chewing gum-stick cigarettes the day Mommykins was taken. I never did again.
Cerberus, Seeking Lethe, by Alexandra Seidel
Poetry.
the fear / like a part of myself, like another head / that no one can see
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Clockwork Rocket by Greg Egan, reviewed by Michael Levy
Wednesday: The Heir of Night by Helen Lowe, reviewed by Katherine Farmar
Friday: The Great Lover by Michael Cisco, reviewed by Ben Godby


3/26/12

A Boy and His Ghosts, by Jeremy L. C. Jones
Article.
My grandfather wrote, "It is a great privilege to live in a town which the dead have not deserted. Walk the streets of Cooperstown with me on a moonlit night, and I'll show you a village where the enchantment of death is a warm and friendly quality."
Scores, by John Clute
Column.
The coat of many colours stained out of uplifted genres that automates a novel like�Angelmaker seems to mask, in Harkaway's case, some Horror of True Sight.
bell, book, candle, by Gwynne Garfinkle
Poetry.
you even lose your cat
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Distrust That Particular Flavor by William Giboson, reviewed by Nina Allan
Wednesday: The Incal by Alejandro Jodorowsky and Moebius, reviewed by Raz Greenberg
Friday: Diving Belles by Lucy Wood, reviewed by David Hebblethwaite


3/19/12

Paraphernalia: Disclosing the Ancient Mysteries, by Mark Plummer
Column.
Fanzines, blogs and podcasts are all different things. They may have certain points of commonality but they're not the same, something that's supported by the way that we have different words for them.
Things Greater than Love, by Kate Bachus
Fiction.
There's a pre-quake, very often, a smaller tremor like the skin of the rock bunches up, muscles tensing before the ground opens and cuts loose and really shakes hard. There'd been a few of those in a row, now.
The Birds: A Collage in Four Legendary Species, by Josh Burson
Poetry.
She might claw my eyes out again, / but she might tell me a river / that flows to the truth
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: When We Were Executioners by J. M. McDermott, reviewed by Jesse Bullington
Wednesday: Never at Home by L. Timmel Ducamp, reviewed by Marina Berlin
Friday: Bright's Passage by Josh Ritter, reviewed by Andrew Liptak
Changing the Guard, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Welcome to Strange Horizons' newest fiction editor, Brit Mandelo!


3/12/12

My Dignity in Scars, by Cory Skerry
Fiction.
The demon is not solid enough yet to break out through my skin, but as it explores the cage of my flesh, it now leaves bruises in its wake. Sometimes it stretches out, and its whip-like tail reaches all the way across my belly. When it thrashes, I press my palms against it to smother it into submission.
Yajñāḥ / Offering, by Shweta Narayan
Poetry.
the only me / I still I had, did Agni dance it to ashes?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Throne of the Crescent Moon by Saladin Ahmed, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Wednesday: The Secret World of Arrietty, reviewed by Indrapramit Das
Friday: Regicide by Nicholas Royle, reviewed by Tori Truslow


3/5/12

Dice and D-Pads: Phones With Friends, by Robyn Fleming
Column.
I got a new smartphone recently, and I'm not going to lie to you—the first thing I did after importing all my contacts was install Fruit Ninja.
Nightfall in the Scent Garden, by Claire Humphrey
Fiction.
You'll start to understand none of these things happened the way you remember. If you read this, you'll learn how I betrayed you.
Atlantis, by Caitlín R. Kiernan
Poetry.
I would so sink the world / But I alone would go a-foundering.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Bronze Summer by Stephen Baxter, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Wednesday: The Mirage by Matt Ruff, reviewed by Sofia Samatar
Friday: The Thorn and the Blossom by Theodora Goss, reviewed by Dan Hartland


2/27/12

Writing Climate Change: A Round Table Discussion, by Niall Harrison
Article.
Julie Bertagna, Tobias Buckell, Maggie Gee, Glenda Larke, Kim Stanley Robinson, Vandana Singh and Joan Slonczewski discuss why and how they write about climate change in their speculative fiction.
Diffractions: Sleepwalking Toward Calamity: The 2011 Climate Conference in Durban, South Africa, by Vandana Singh
Column.
In the winter of 2011, from November 28 to December 11, the countries of the world met to save it from peril.
The Vampire Astronomer, by Chris Willrich
Poetry.
But they have whispered dark worries / He never voices in journals. / Why does the universe lurch / With the freight of mass unseen?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Blood Red Road by Moira Young, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: An Exile on Planet Earth: Articles and Reflections by Brian Aldiss, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Friday: ODD? Volume 1, edited by Ann & Jeff VanderMeer, reviewed by Ben Godby
Results of the 2011 Readers' Poll, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
What were your favorites from last year?


2/20/12

Tornado's Siren, by Brooke Bolander
Fiction.
For a moment everything stops. The tornado's voice grows still. All the little chunks of trash hang frozen in the air, like someone's just hit the pause button. Rhea can see flowering shrubs and someone's shoe, a lawn gnome and two china cups. Then, just as suddenly, it all comes tumbling down.
Hyphenated American, by Nima Kian
Poetry.
The father shattered like digital glass / and became his son's fantasy: / building parts of what a father should be / if the child fostered a man.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Ready Player One by Ernest Cline, reviewed by Chris Kammerud
Wednesday: Empire State by Adam Christopher, reviewed by Indrapramit Das
Friday: Bringer of Light by Jaine Fenn, reviewed by Duncan Lawie


2/13/12

Intertitles: Tinker Tailor Soldier Sci-Fi: Espionage and the Speculative, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
A man walks through a hub room where outside information is being gathered and translated by crew members who shuttle it through the circulatory system; he steps into the padded orange room at the center of it all, where he sits down at a black glass table and reports to an inscrutable Control that the enemy is on the move.
Aftermath (Part 2 of 2), by Joy Kennedy-O'Neill
Fiction.
They came at all hours of the day and night. They scraped along the side of the house, moaned at the doors, ran their fingernails over the boards.
Tongueless, by Mari Ness
Poetry.
In the heat, my vision shimmers. / I thought it would be different, as a bird.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Misfits, Season 3, reviewed by Guria King
Wednesday: The Company Man by Robert Jackson Bennett, reviewed by Niall Harisson
Friday: Germline by T. C. McCarthy, reviewed by Liz Bourke


2/6/12

Aftermath (Part 1 of 2), by Joy Kennedy-O'Neill
Fiction.
Things seem almost back to normal--there is no smoke on the horizon, the barricades have been removed, and grass and bluebonnets grow on the side of the road. There are birds singing, red-tailed hawks catching the thermals, and the buzzards are only devouring roadkill. It's just a possum. Everything is fine.
Tesla's Waltz, by WC Roberts
Poetry.
a double-shot of Mickey Finn by wireless / brings Persephone to life
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Songs of the Earth by Elspeth Cooper, reviewed by Marina Berlin
Wednesday: The Man Who Rained by Ali Shaw, reviewed by Nina Allan
Friday: Chronicle, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum


1/30/12

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
The pure modernist extremism of Kafka is to show us a world without bling.
The Chastisement of Your Peace, by Tracy Canfield
Fiction.
"Midnight Cruiser abducted the president of the American Psychological Association and fed him to her pet hyena," said Jenny. "Oh my God, she is awesome."
Ariel, by Erik Amundsen
Poetry.
It's not / quite true, my sister-brother, it's your foot-tread in the / mist, it's neither one nor quite the other.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Children of the Sky by Vernor Vinge, reviewed by Andy Sawyer
Wednesday: Gods Without Men by Hari Kunzru, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Friday: The Bone Spindle by Anne Sheldon, reviewed by Sofia Samatar


1/23/12

Bridge Over Troubled Waters: The City of Haifa in Lavie Tidhar's Stories, by Ehud Maimon
Article.
When looked upon together from some distance, a clear picture of Haifa as it is seen in Lavie Tidhar's vision emerges. This vision produces a unique outcome, a speculative city which is at the same time universal and local.
Paraphernalia: FIADSBLTPPUTPWYP, by Mark Plummer
Column.
I don�t count myself as part of the dinner party wing of fandom, the people who seem to see SF conventions primarily as an assembly point for a series of epic meal excursions.
Carrington's Ferry, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
but as the taxi rushed the Lisbon streets / a voice heard from the wrong end / of a trumpet whispered new instructions / and she demanded instead the embassy / to Mexico
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Wind Angels by Leigh Kennedy, reviewed by Nina Allan
Wednesday: I, Robot: To Protect by Mickey Zucker Reichert, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Friday: By Light Alone by Adam Roberts, reviewed by Nic Clarke


1/16/12

Recognizing Gabe: un cuento de hadas, by Alberto Yáñez
Fiction.
When I was twelve, my hada madrina came to visit. My fairy godmother hadn't come to see us since my baptism, so I didn't even know her except from the stories, like the one about cousin Tomasita and the goat who could play f�tbol.
The Lord Charon, by Tony Grist
Poetry.
When the moment is right we go into his sack.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: American Horror Story, Season 1, reviewed by Roz Kaveney
Wednesday: All Men of Genius by Lev A. C. Rosen, reviewed by Sofia Samatar
Friday: Cloud Permutations by Lavie Tidhar, reviewed by Aishwarya Subramanian


1/9/12

Dice and D-Pads: Jumping to Beginnings, by Robyn Fleming
Column.
My husband and I had a pretty funny conversation with my mother this past New Year's Eve.
In the Cold, by Kelly Jennings
Fiction.
Without anyone ever exactly saying so, I know I'm top of the stack for Chair of Executive when the time comes for Second to take charge: the obvious choice, the only one of us with the math and the mouth and the will to step up. Which does not mean I like the idea.
Loki, Dynamicist, by Michele Bannister
Poetry.
the more bodies I add the better / though always it lacks neatly-nailed resolution.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Hull Zero Three by Greg Bear, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Wednesday: Further Conflicts, edited by Ian Whates, reviewed by Katherine Farmar
Friday: Theft of Swords by Michael J. Sullivan, reviewed by Liz Bourke


1/2/12

Lexias: Kipple, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
In a recent essay in The New York Times, Jonathan Ames wrote about kipple. I was thrilled. Not just because it�s nice to see other people writing about the messes of their lives, but also because kipple has been a favorite term of mine ever since I encountered it in Philip K. Dick�s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
MonitorBot and the King of Pop, by Jessica Barber
Fiction.
She screams and backs up into the edge of her desk before she can get a hold on herself. MonitorBots are scary sons of bitches no matter what form they're choosing to take, and right now this one is in full-on enforcer mode, having arranged itself into a humanoid shape, except eight feet tall and with solid blocky limbs that could piledrive through her skull like it was nothing.
Fallen, by Shannon Connor Winward
Poetry.
Like a fledgling fallen from the nest / my scent erased by human hands / I cannot go home again.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 2011 In Review, reviewed by Our Reviewers
Wednesday: After the Apocalypse by Maureen F. McHugh, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Friday: The Highest Frontier by Joan Slonczewski, reviewed by Indrapramit Das


12/19/11

Intertitles: Frame Story: Drive, Shame, and the Aesthetics of Identity, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
In a gold-toned, anonymous hotel room, a man stands with his back to the camera, looking out at the empty night-roads of LA.
Ash and Dust (Part 2 of 2), by Jennifer Mason-Black
Fiction.
In the surprised cries and furious nuzzles of those just born, in the tears of fathers too tired to hide their delight, in the amazement of mothers holding their noses to perfect smooth skin as they counted fingers and toes, I saw joy. I could not feel it though, any more than I could register anger or fear or excitement.
Imageography, by Robert Frazier
Poetry.
But the telling image for me / Is Einstein standing in his study / Books askew on the shelves
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: After the Golden Age by Carrie Vaughn, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: Attack the Block, reviewed by Guria King
Friday: Count to a Trillion by John C. Wright, reviewed by Dan Hartland


12/12/11

Diffractions: Science, Emotions, and Culture (Part 3), by Vandana Singh
Column.
Richard Feynman, in his Lectures on Physics, commenting on the poetic notion that the universe is in a glass of wine, exclaims thus:
Ash and Dust (Part 1 of 2), by Jennifer Mason-Black
Fiction.
We were not meant to be here long. A month, maybe two, they said at first, when the fires burned and the colonies opened their doors wide for the final exodus from Earth. Then, three months, six. Then they stopped talking time at all, just directions and rules and reminders not to forget the laws of a civilized society.
Wendy Darling Has Bad Dreams, by Sally Rosen Kindred
Poetry.
I think now I was meant to be the clock / in the crocodile, to claim warm minutes / in the story�s gut, / in the boneless dark
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two by Kate Elliott: Traitors' Gate and Cold Fire, reviewed by Kari Sperring and Liz Bourke
Wednesday: Mylo Xyloto, by Coldplay, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Friday: The Janus Tree and Other Stories by Glen Hirshberg, reviewed by Tori Truslow


12/5/11

Penelope Napolitano and the Butterflies, by Aliya Whiteley
Fiction.
You can travel the world, you can see Kuala Lumpur and the Côte D'Azur, go everywhere, try anything; but it all comes down to one moment where you realise you're about to get engaged to a deeply lovely man who is undoubtedly going to turn you into your mother.
The Theater for Cloud Repair, by Sandra J. Lindow
Poetry.
Personal weather / is de rigueur for poets this year.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: In Time, reviewed by Raz Greenberg
Wednesday: Rule 34 by Charles Stross, reviewed by Alexandra Pierce
Friday: Master of the House of Darts by Aliette de Bodard, reviewed by Maya Chhabra


11/28/11

Watching the Watches: An Interview with Sergei Lukyanenko, by Nicholas Seeley
Article.
Nicholas Seeley asks Sergei Lukyanenko about writing, movies, video games, and the value of an international approach to writing fantasy.
Love in the Quantum Era, by Greg Leunig
Poetry.
Every device was a nanotech construct made of you. / Each night my blender deconstructed in front of me / and rebuilt itself in your image.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Conan's Brethren and Sword Woman and Other Historical Adventures by Robert E. Howard, reviewed by William Mingin
Wednesday: Another Earth, reviewed by Marina Berlin
Friday: Utopia by Ahmed Khaled Towfik, reviewed by Sofia Samatar


11/21/11

Paraphernalia: Anniversary Drinks, by Mark Plummer
Column.
Science fiction fandom is still a few years short of the first of its centenaries but there are plenty of three-quarter century anniversaries coming up, often with attendant disputes or alternatives allowing a maximum spread of celebrations.
Tomorrow Is Waiting, by Holli Mintzer
Fiction.
She also found herself liking Kermit a lot more than she'd expected to. Anji had never really watched the Muppets before; her parents, like most parents she knew, had treated TV as only slightly less corrupting an influence than refined sugar and gendered toys. But the Muppet Show was really funny—strange, and kind of hokey, but charming all the same. She ended up watching way more of it than she needed just for the project.
Thumbelina Grows Up, by Jenny Rossi
Poetry.
Listen to Freud�s sonorous voice—you are trickster friends.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Seed by Rob Ziegler, reviewed by Matt Hilliard
Wednesday: The Uncertain Places by Lisa Goldstein, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Friday: The Wolf's Hour and The Hunter from the Woods by Robert McCammon, reviewed by Nathaniel Katz


11/14/11

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
But if it is a stricture to suggest that apophasis-ridden SF texts are time-wasters (I do mean to suggest that), then Wilson and Gregory are exempt.
Eight, by Corinne Duyvis
Fiction.
If everything went well, I'm back in safe, familiar 2020, and across from me in this slowly forming room, in the center of all these people awaiting my arrival, is twenty-one-years-young me.
Ralph Touchett Awaits Revision, by Gwynne Garfinkle
Poetry.
Alternately, to breathe through gills, no need / of blasted lungs, would be a mercy. But / I would not like to be a ghost, for that / is close to what I am.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Future Media, edited by Rick Wilber, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Wednesday: Infidel by Kameron Hurley, reviewed by Sarah Frost
Friday: Version 43 and Hellship by Philip Palmer, reviewed by Rhiannon Lassiter


11/7/11

Dice and D-Pads: Serious Casual Business, by Robyn Fleming
Column.
I bought a new game in September which I've been playing pretty much nonstop.
Counting Cracks, by George R. Galuschak
Fiction.
Four of us, jammed into my sister's Ford Festiva, going to kill the monster.
Missed Connection: Lizard in the Dog Park, by Polenth Blake
Poetry.
your lizard's smoke chased me but / now my roots are deeper
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Robopocalypse by Daniel H. Wilson, reviewed by Phoebe North
Wednesday: Deadline by Mira Grant, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Friday: Bricks by Leon Jenner, reviewed by Shaun Duke


10/31/11

Even the Old Ones Get the Blues: An Interview with John Hornor Jacobs, by Molly Tanzer
Article.
But seriously, in my descriptions of Arkansas, I try to convey some of the decay, the innate corruptness of the human experience in the South. Even here, in Little Rock in 2011, the social stratification that existed in the 1950s still exists.
Lexias: Reading Systems, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
As with so many other things, my devotion to Gustave Flaubert�s A Sentimental Education can be blamed on Samuel R. Delany.
Introduction to "Particle Theory", by Ted Chiang
Fiction.
Introduction to this week's reprinted story.
Particle Theory, by Edward Bryant
Fiction.
"If you're right," she said, "it could be the most fantastic event a scientist could observe and record." Her eyes refocused and met mine. "Or it might be the most frightening; a final horror."
Reconciling Fundamental Forces and Matter, by Marci Rae Johnson
Poetry.
Long bar table shining / like heaven. Sit down. Let me / tell you my theory of everything—
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 21st Century Gothic, edited by Danel Olsen, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Wednesday: Mechanique: A Tale of the Circus Tresaulti by Genevieve Valentine and The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Friday: Love and Romanpunk by Tansy Rayner Roberts, reviewed by Erin Horáková


10/24/11

Cosmic Horror in John Carpenter's "Apocalypse Trilogy", by Orrin Grey
Article.
Perhaps because it's the first film in the "Apocalypse Trilogy," the themes that tie the three movies together are the most subtle in The Thing. The story concerns an alien creature found frozen in Antarctic ice that can absorb, digest, and then imitate perfectly any creature that it comes into contact with. What follows from its discovery is a classic meditation on paranoia, punctuated by some of the best practical special effects ever put on film.
Intertitles: There's No Happy Ending with Me: The Fall, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
The thing about The Fall is, it's hopeless.
Tickling the Dragon, by Jeannine Hall Gailey
Poetry.
Oppenheimer would complain about his pangs / of conscience, the images of his friend haunting him.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Enterprise of Death by Jesse Bullington, reviewed by Richard Larson
Wednesday: Sword of Fire and Sea by Erin Hoffman, reviewed by Liz Bourke
Friday: The Silver Wind by Nina Allan, reviewed by Sofia Samatar


In Search of a New Look, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Design a new logo for Strange Horizons, and if your entry is selected, win $252.30, plus the first T-shirt printed with the new logo—plus the kudos factor of seeing your work here in the magazine.

10/17/11

Librarians in the Branch Library of Babel, by Shaenon K. Garrity
Fiction.
Carol and I were librarians at an infinite library where roughly 72% of books are Moby-Dick. Our library contains, within in its stacks, every edition of Moby-Dick that ever has been or will be or could be published. So does the main Library, of course, but at our branch the probability of coming across one of them is much higher.
Strange Oblivion, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
but something's in the wind / crows know
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Reamde by Neal Stephenson, reviewed by Indrapramit Das
Wednesday: Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson, reviewed by Katherine Farmar
Friday: Zone One by Colson Whitehead, reviewed by Chris Kammerud


10/10/11

Diffractions: On Science, Emotions and Culture (Part 2), by Vandana Singh
Column.
I wondered why, in current Western SF and in science, emotions were apparently considered suspect (except for some specific ones like awe or wonder) and were associated with women.
The Fourth Board, by D J Muir
Fiction.
Today, the Tyrant will ask Jinli's father to bring out the hao ryl set, sit down with him, and play a game. When the game is decided, the Tyrant will ask Father to bring Jinli before him, and to have her read his future. And Jinli knows that things will not happen this afternoon quite as anyone has planned.
American Poetry 101 Mashup, by G. O. Clark
Poetry.
when Robert's / snowy woods glow with / an unearthly light—
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Testament of Jessie Lamb by Jane Rogers, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Engines of Desire: Tales of Love & Other Horrors by Livia Llewellyn, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Friday: In Other Worlds: SF and the Human Imagination by Margaret Atwood, reviewed by Martin Lewis


10/3/11

Destiny, With a Blackberry Sauce, by David J. Schwartz
Fiction.
Another thing that happened was that I caught this fish, this gorgeous fat salmon, and it said that it would grant me a boon if I let it go. I said I was pretty hungry so I'd pass.
Haruspicy, by Gemma Files
Poetry.
And yet, I am still / more as you than either of us / would like to think.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle
Wednesday: The Great Night by Chris Adrian, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Friday: The Adjustment Team: The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume 2, reviewed by T. S. Miller


A Fund Drive Update, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.

9/26/11

Vegan Apocalypse: The Deep Ecological Fiction of David Agranoff, by Nicholas Pell
Article.
I love the powerful feeling a well-told story gives me, so I have always wanted to have that power. To tell a story that can shock, disturb, amuse, or move someone is the ultimate goal of my writing.
Paraphernalia: Beyond the Enchanted Convention to the Enchanted Peter R. Weston Memorial Defibrillator Station, by Mark Plummer
Column.
The online membership list for this year�s Worldcon, Renovation, lists 143 people with British addresses. Of those, 79 had full attending memberships while 64 were �supporters.�
Wallpaper, by April Grant
Poetry.
She has known these walls too long; / They tell her nothing now.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Islanders by Christopher Priest, reviewed by Niall Alexander
Wednesday: Yellowcake by Margo Lanagan, reviewed by Sofia Samatar
Friday: Mr Fox by Helen Oyeyemi, reviewed by Andy Sawyer


9/19/11

A Box of Thunder, by Lewis Shiner
Fiction.
«Everyone here,» Alex said, «is supposed to have signed the compact that pledged us to nonviolence.» He felt like an imposter, piling lies on top of the blatant violation of his own code that was already in progress. «We knew there would be a test sooner or later. This is it.»
The Book of Drowned Things, by Adrienne J. Odasso
Poetry.
Death has always wanted me closer / than those she steals from my arms.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Torchwood: Miracle Day, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Dancing With Bears: The Postutopian Adventures of Darger and Surplus by Michael Swanwick, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Friday: Redwood and Wilfire by Andrea Hairston and Galore by Michael Crummey, reviewed by Karen Burnham


9/12/11

Dice and D-Pads: Default Is Another Word for Fail, by Robyn Fleming
Column.
What I mean by inclusiveness is whether or not a wide variety of players—not just the stereotypical audience of young, white, heterosexual males—will be able to see themselves represented at least a little bit as they play.
Messengers from the Stars Will Come To Help Us Overcome the Obstacles That Hold Us Back From Achieving Our True Potential., by Grady Hendrix
Fiction.
The Staging Area was full of purpose that morning. Everyone was excited about the Upload and we were all on task for Mission Success. I woke up full of glory and went down to Room A to calorie load, which was what we called breakfast.
In the Third Cycle, by Rose Lemberg
Poetry.
When your lips pressed / warm upon my palm, I should have known.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Welcome to Bordertown: New Stories and Poems of the Borderlands, edited by Holly Black and Ellen Kushner, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Wednesday: Osama by Lavie Tidhar, reviewed by Michael Levy
Friday: Sleight of Hand by Peter S. Beagle, reviewed by T. S. Miller


9/5/11

Lexias: World on a Wire, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Welcome to the future—which is also Paris in the winter of 1973.
The Fountain and the Shoe Store, by Paul Steven Marino
Fiction.
"Look," I said, "this might be the last thing I ever build. And it'd be nice to have one last meeting where the review board doesn't ask if the Four Horsemen are going to show up, or if we've planned enough drainage for all the rivers of blood."
Lie-Father, by Gemma Files
Poetry.
I could always make you laugh.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Game of Thrones, Season 1, reviewed by Niall Harrison and Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Fenrir by M.D. Lachlan, reviewed by Nandini Ramachandran
Friday: Sensation by Nick Mamatas, reviewed by Molly Tanzer


8/29/11

Pat Cadigan: A Retrospective, by Tanya Brown
Article.
A cursory web-search will tell you that Pat Cadigan is the Queen of Cyberpunk, but who wants to be queen of a moribund genre? BBC TV's Future Fantastic designated her, more promisingly, "the queen of modern science fiction;" Wired, though, may have come closest to the truth with the plaudit "sci-fi maverick."
Intertitles: Adaptation (and Other Conversations), by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
The art of movie adaptation is a tricky one; though Hollywood has scoured literature for material since moving pictures were invented, it's awfully easy for the process to go unspeakably awry.
Introduction to "Home by the Sea", by Tricia Sullivan
Fiction.
Cadigan's work spikes the envelope of Ballard's alienation and penetrates, bloodied, into that sense of bewilderment and near-panic that underlies nightmare.
Home by the Sea, by Pat Cadigan
Fiction.
"At the hospital, people are offering themselves for exploratory surgery and vivisection. And the doctors who have a stomach for such things cut them open and explore their insides. Sometimes they remove internal organs and sew the people up again to see how they manage without them. They manage fine. And there is no blood, no blood anywhere."
Trenchcoat, by April Grant
Poetry.
Here's your own world, bounded by one coat
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Dervish is Digital by Pat Cadigan, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Wednesday: Fool to Believe: Remarks on Some Short Stories By Pat Cadigan, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Friday: Teaching Science Fiction, edited by Andy Sawyer and Peter Wright, reviewed by Sarah Monette
The 2011 Strange Horizons Fund Drive, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
These things seem to come around before you know it, don't they?

8/22/11

Ecology and the Post-Apocalypse, by Banks Miller
Article.
By taking the time to think through their worlds scientifically, authors might not just find striking images and new apocalyptic possibilities, but will be able to engage their readers� interest more thoroughly in speculation that presses beyond the pages of fiction.
Diffractions: On Science, Emotions, and Culture (Part 1), by Vandana Singh
Column.
[A] woman who had been a biology major confided in me that when she felt bad about killing baby mice for a biology research project, her professor (a woman, also) said something like: "How can you become a scientist if you are going to get so emotional?"
La Donna del Lago, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
as he drowned unknowing, / pursued her murmur down into the deeps.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Brood of Foxes by Kristin Livdahl, reviewed by Chris Kammerud
Wednesday: A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness, reviewed by Phoebe North
Friday: Enigmatic Pilot by Kris Saknussemm, reviewed by Indrapramit Das


8/15/11

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
It does now seem absolutely clear that any story of the fantastic set upon this planet in the twenty-first century either deals with where we live, or sucks vacuum. So when I saw the words "Urban Fantasy" in the titles of the two compilations under review, a slim hope dawned.
Souvenir, by Genevieve Valentine
Fiction.
The body's a week old, and Claudia hopes there's still a nice sharp souvenir left. Cops don't like vague answers from touches.
Come to Venice, by Cythera
Poetry.
Perhaps she was afraid of love.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Life on Paper by Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud, reviewed by Sofia Samatar
Wednesday: Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Friday: The Fecund's Melancholy Daughter by Brent Hayward, reviewed by Matt Hilliard


8/8/11

The Rugged Track (part 2 of 2), by Liz Argall
Fiction.
Princess Bite did not want to die; she wanted to do and try everything and then do it all again. But she had sworn by the sky above, the speed in her skates, and the rugged track before her that she would save her mother, and so she would.
Zombie Heart, by Charles Cantrell
Poetry.
He is dying / to be a vegetarian, but his wife won�t have it.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Trouble and Her Friends by Melissa Scott, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Wednesday: Corvus by Paul Kearney, reviewed by Marina Berlin
Friday: The Age of Odin by James Lovegrove, reviewed by Rhiannon Lassiter


8/1/11

Paraphernalia: Rockets in Reno, by Mark Plummer
Column.
The Worldcons are home to The Hugo Awards, an annual process whereby—the cynics would have you believe—science fiction fandom as represented by members of the current and previous Worldcons collectively produces shortlists that fail to identify the best genre achievements of the previous calendar year. Everybody then expends an enormous amount of wordage discussing these lists, before Worldcon members proceed to give the awards themselves to the wrong works. Less cynically, they're one of the most well-known and easily the longest-established awards for excellence in the field of science fiction and fantasy.
The Rugged Track (part 1 of 2), by Liz Argall
Fiction.
Princess Bite learned to skate as she learned how to walk. Lady Push Comes to Shove and Princess Bite would hurtle around the track so fast it felt like flying. They skated together every day until Lady Shove's illness made it too difficult and painful.
Foxes, by Jamieson Ridenhour
Poetry.
The cobbled / street under his paws was a slice / of Victoria, a pocket of time trapped / beneath the bridge, older than I, / and grittier.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: God's War by Kameron Hurley, reviewed by Dan Hartland;
Wednesday: Mardock Scramble by Tow Ubukata, reviewed by Katherine Farmar
Friday: Chime by Franny Billingsley, reviewed by Hallie O'Donovan

7/25/11

A Time to Die, by Michael Keyton
Article.
Trollope's characters may be cardboard and his future risible, but the moral issues he raises and explores are both prescient and subtle. If science fiction is the last bastion of serious philosophical writing, Trollope, in this respect, was more prescient than most other writers.
Our Father Who Art, by Jeanie Tomasko
Poetry.
I was given to watercolor; / dreamy pictures of heaven / and earth—though oil was / tempting.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Deathless by Catherynne M. Valente, reviewed by Erin Horáková
Wednesday: Two Views: The Dragon's Path by Daniel Abraham, reviewed by Nathaniel Katz and Maria Velazquez
Friday: Times Three by Robert Silverberg, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro


7/18/11

Dice and D-Pads: Cover Me, by Robyn Fleming
Column.
The day after Christmas in 1994, my father upgraded our family computer with a new CD-ROM drive. This wasn't because one of us had received the hardware as a gift—in fact, Dad had to brave the post-holiday morass at the local electronics store to buy the thing. The drive was for my benefit, because I'd been given a copy of King's Quest VII: The Princeless Bride. The advanced graphics in the brand-new Sierra release were too robust for our old drive, and I was so disappointed at being unable to play that my parents decided it was probably time to beef up the computer anyway. (I suspect that Dad might have had a bit of personal interest in that decision, but I'm certainly not going to hold it against him.)
Bleaker Collegiate Presents an All-Female Production of Waiting for Godot, by Claire Humphrey
Fiction.
It's only in hindsight that I realize why I started spending time in the smoke-hole in the first place. So many of the things we do, we keep from ourselves.
The Internet in Heaven, by Sara Polsky
Poetry.
When you sign on, my instant message service creaks like a door's hinges / not oiled enough to admit a ghost.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Betrayer by C. J. Cherryh, reviewed by Lila Garrott
Wednesday: Mistification by Kaaron Warren, reviewed by Niall Alexander
Friday: The Neon Court by Kate Griffin, reviewed by Guria King

7/11/11

Lexias: Old, Weird, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
One of my favorite descriptions of just about anything is Greil Marcus's description of Bob Dylan's bootleg "basement tapes" as harking back to "the old, weird America" of the songs collected on Harry Smith's Anthology of American Folk Music records. Marcus, in fact, titled his book about the basement tapes The Old, Weird America. Within the science fiction community, there's been lots of discussion of The New Weird over the last decade, but listening to Smith's Anthology provides a more profoundly weird experience than any I've ever had with fiction.
The Peacock, by Ted Infinity and Nabil Hijazi
Fiction.
"No HA HA not at all I am just making a joke. Please ignore my last two extremely suspicious metaphors. No need to contact authorities. No need to send your bank account information."
The Mesozoic Tour Guide, by Ken Liu
Poetry.
If baby theropods warble, / It means they like your yellow dress. / Keep your arms inside at all times.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Universe of Things by Gwyneth Jones, reviewed by Paul Graham Raven
Wednesday: Full Dark, No Stars by Stephen King, reviewed by Raz Greenberg
Friday: Seed Seeker by Pamela Sargent, reviewed by Phoebe North

7/4/11

Intertitles: In Praise of the Glorious Mess, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
For all the nonlinear narrative that has stymied reviews of The Tree of Life, you can't really say that one goes into it unprepared for oddity. When a film gets booed at Cannes, and then goes on to win the Palme d'Or, you know something is up.
One-Eyed Jack's, by Tracy Canfield
Fiction.
She oughter do something about the Sing. She oughter do something about One-Eyed Jack's. But if she took one of them on, the other would have the valley to itself; and she wasn't certain she had the strength to fight them both, what with keeping one eye on I-79 every minute of the day.
Homebound, by Shweta Narayan
Poetry.
She comes into my kitchen for a slice / of black bread, buttered. I've grown so tired, / she says, of cake.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Eclipse Four, edited by Jonathan Strahan, reviewed by Richard Larson
Wednesday: The Mall by S.L. Grey, reviewed by Tori Truslow
Friday: Kings of the North by Elizabeth Moon, reviewed by Sarah Frost

6/27/11

More Real Than Real: Philip K. Dick's Visionary Posthumanism, by Alex Lyras
Article.
The more we debate the potential merits of artificial intelligence and advanced robotics, a topic inundating the zeitgeist with weekly leaps in smart technology, the more relevant the 1982 film Blade Runner becomes. Add our addiction to social networking, first-person role-playing games, and every other facet of life involving a "simulated" self, and the film appears to be nothing short of prescient.
Living with the Other: Animals, the City, and the Future, by Vandana Singh
Column.
I have been a city girl all my life—despite a constant desire for a more exciting life, such as living in a tree or a cave, I never even got a chance to live in the country. I spent most of my formative years in the metropolis of New Delhi, with summer trips to the large, sprawling town of Patna to see my grandparents. Yet even in the country's capital, a city of millions, my life was filled with daily encounters with non-humans.
The Curator Speaks in the Department of Dead Languages, by Megan Arkenberg
Poetry.
Even the ones that survive have been / broken, lamed, their limbs amputated, / their features mangled past recognition.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein
Wednesday: White Cat by Holly Black, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Friday: The Illumination by Kevin Brockmeier, reviewed by Christy Tidwell

6/20/11

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
A few weeks ago I left London and entered the future again.
The All-Night Truck Stop Polka Band (part 2 of 2), by Shaenon K. Garrity
Fiction.
A muscular, white-toothed UPS man stood in the hall. Except that he wasn't a UPS man. Someone had clearly put a lot of work into the uniform, but it was the wrong shade of brown and some of the insignias read PSU. He had two lobes on each ear, which was probably another mistake.
Plaster Messiahs, by Marge Simon
Poetry.
I dreamed of butterflies, / but when the storms came, / they lifted up and disappeared.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Infernal Devices by K.W. Jeter, reviewed by Brendan Byrne
Wednesday: The Arctic Marauder by Jacques Tardi, reviewed by Chris Kammerud
Friday: Aurorarama by Jean-Christophe Valtat, reviewed by Adam Roberts

6/13/11

Running Away to Bordertown: An Interview with Holly Black, Ellen Kushner, and Terri Windling, by Karen Meisner
Article.
We're all sharing the same streets, the same landmarks, and in some cases even the same characters . . . but we see them in different ways. And, to me, that makes for fascinating fiction.
A Medley of Authors (Re)Visit One Magical City: Welcome to Bordertown, by Karen Meisner
Article.
I can remember reading Bordertown stories and looking up from the page to find certain familiar streets suddenly holding the possibility of leading me into new and strange places...
Heroes of Tomorrow: Adventures in Unreality, by Karen Healey
Column.
We've all encountered people who won't read—or scorn those who do read—science fiction and fantasy because they are insufficiently "true" and "real." Teenagers, especially, are taught that they'll grow out of fantastic fiction as they leave that silly fake stuff behind. It's the kind of thing that makes me roll my eyes, and then want to interrogate the notions of reality and truth as applied to young adult fiction. So, what the hey, let's give that a go.
The All-Night Truck Stop Polka Band (part 1 of 2), by Shaenon K. Garrity
Fiction.
Meanwhile, the band members were busy. They were saving the world. They mentioned this pretty often, although all they seemed to do was drink beer, smoke Marlboros, watch TV, and raid the kitchen. They all loved TV. They'd missed thirteen years of it, and everything fascinated them.
Maelbrigte's Woman, by Anne Sheldon
Poetry.
My eldest son has brought me home / his father's head. / I have not asked him how / or what or who it cost, / but I have used it in a charm.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Surface Detail by Iain M. Banks, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: The Colony by Jillian Weise, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Friday: Among Thieves by Douglas Hulick, reviewed by Alexandra Pierce

6/6/11

Paraphernalia: Dinner With My Friends, by Mark Plummer
Column.
I was reading a science fiction magazine the other day. It was the June 1976 issue of Amazing Science Fiction, the "big all new all star 50th anniversary issue!" featuring stories by Isaac Asimov, Lester Del Rey, Harlan Ellison, Fritz Leiber, and others. But in deference to these gentlemen—and I note that the nine pieces of fiction are all written by men aside from one story co-written by Lil and Kris Neville—I'd actually pulled this particular issue down from the shelves for an installment of "The Club House."
Peerless, by Karen Munro
Fiction.
This lady's shoes were tremendous. I've shined the shoes of men six and a half feet tall, and they weren't as big as hers. And not just long, either—wide, broad, almost circular.
Past Human, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
All men are created equal but we / can fix that now:
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Search for Philip K. Dick by Anne R. Dick and The King of the Elves: The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume I, reviewed by Andy Sawyer
Wednesday: Twilight Robbery by Frances Hardinge, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: Swamplandia! by Karen Russell, reviewed by Chris Kammerud

5/30/11

Perfectly Herself: A discussion of the work of Carol Emshwiller, by Ursula K. Le Guin, Helen Merrick, Pat Murphy, and Gary K. Wolfe
Article.
After a career of many phases, she's found a comfortable way to synthesize all of them, making her all over again the proverbial writer to watch. I don't know if there's another 90 year old author anywhere about whom that could be said.
The Emshwillerians, by Karen Joy Fowler
Column.
Recently I've begun to notice elements, techniques, and viewpoints from Carol's writing in more places than my own stories. For decades, Carol has primarily been published as a science fiction writer. My impression is that, while always admired and often beloved, her work was seen as essentially idiosyncratic. Whatever it was she was doing, she was doing it alone, and off in her own brilliant little corner of the field. She is the sort of writer to whom the word "quirky" is applied. "A writer's writer." "A cult favorite."
Introduction to After All, by Gavin J. Grant
Fiction.
Introduction to this week's reprinted story.
After All, by Carol Emshwiller
Fiction.
I was thinking to write a story about somebody who needs to change (the best sort of character to write about), and all of a sudden I knew it was me who had to change. Always had been, and I didn't realize it until that very minute. So I have to be the one to go on a journey, either of discovery or in order to avoid myself.
Waking the Red Guardian, by WC Roberts
Poetry.
tendrils of fiber optics from torn sheet metal / dripping visions of worlds to come
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Collected Stories of Carol Emshwiller, Volume 1, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: Carmen Dog by Carol Emshwiller, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Friday: Ledoyt and Leaping Man Hill by Carol Emshwiller, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller

5/23/11

Dice and D-Pads: Fannish Enthusiasm, by Robyn Fleming
Column.
I've been a little hesitant to read all my feeds, expecting a Portal 2-related explosion. And there's been one. But, interestingly, none of what has been scrolling across my feeds is actually about the game. I know people are playing it; I can infer from the lack of disappointed commentary that they're enjoying it (my friends tend to be a little more vocal about the things they dislike than anything else during a first playthrough of a new game). But what my friends are actually posting about isn't the game itself, but rather fanworks inspired by the Portal franchise.
If Alice. . ., by Alexandra Seidel
Poetry.
If Alice had been born in China / her feet would have been bound
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Evaporating Genres: Essays on Fantastic Literature by Gary K. Wolfe, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Wednesday: Harbinger of the Storm by Aliette de Bodard, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Friday: Son of Heaven by David Wingrove, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy

5/16/11

Lexias: Joanna Russ, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Joanna Russ died a week ago as I write this. Or, to be more accurate: Joanna Russ died a week ago as I struggle to write this. I thought I might collect some of her sentences and frame them with my own as a memorial, but once I started rereading her works, I got stuck. It'll be easy, I told myself. Just find some good passages and proclaim their wonders and note what we've lost in losing Russ and— And easier thought than done.
The Holder's Black-Haired Daughter, by Kelly Jennings
Fiction.
This is a story you can hear told through all the stations over there by the Drift and just beyond, and if you put a gun to my head I would not swear to you one way or another whether it is a true story, but it is true enough. It will do.
Mythical Cities of Southwestern Minnesota, by Megan Kurashige
Poetry.
And still we crossed it in the dark: / Like ships, like mail, like the blind—
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: What I Didn't See and Other Stories by Karen Joy Fowler, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Wednesday: Ice Trilogy by Vladimir Sorokin, reviewed by Michael Froggatt
Friday: Subterranean Tales of Dark Fantasy 2, edited by William Shafer, reviewed by Niall Alexander

5/9/11

Intertitles: "A Strange and Savage Beauty": Carlos Saura's Flamenco Trilogy, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
Dance—an art form whose energy, grace, and wordless emotion could have been designed expressly for film—has often served as a cinematic gateway drug to the surreal and supernatural.
Young Love on the Run from the Federal Alien Administration New Mexico Division (1984), by Grant Stone
Fiction.
When she gets it right, it will signal the mothership. If there's a mothership. She thinks there's a mothership, but the smile she gives him, trembling slightly at the corners, shows she's not completely sure.
Telling Deaths, by Lila Garrott
Poetry.
There will be sometime something I have not thought of.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Slice of Life by Paul Haines, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Wednesday: My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, reviewed by Michael H. Payne
Friday: The Door to Lost Pages by Claude Lalumière, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont

5/2/11

Diffractions: Rewilding the World, by Vandana Singh
Column.
There's something about planting a tree. I'm no gardener, having only recently graduated to the point where I am not killing off my house plants, but on every occasion that I've planted a tree I have remembered for long afterward the feeling of bringing something into being that was greater than myself. But I never imagined that any human being could plant an entire rainforest.
The Thick Night, by Sunny Moraine
Fiction.
She doesn't look at it the whole way home. She doesn't know how to look at it: you look at a person one way, and a thing another way, and the two are not the same.
What Ray Taught Me, by Jenny Rossi
Poetry.
I once fell in love with a man who had an open book for a face.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Harmony by Project Itoh, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Outcasts, reviewed by Niall Alexander
Friday: Welcome to the Greenhouse, edited by Gordon Van Gelder, reviewed by Karen Burnham

4/25/11

"Fascinated by the Grotesque and Macabre": An Interview with Jonathan L. Howard, by Molly Tanzer
Article.
If you're uninvested, it will show. In my case, I've been fascinated by the grotesque and the macabre ever since I can remember. I don't really know why that should be—I didn't live in a house that featured much in the way of inspirational materials for such interests—but I cleaved to everything that bore the faintest tang of the uncanny.
Scores, by John Clute
Column.
Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blew sand in my face.
Tonight I Know, by Shweta Narayan
Poetry.
You, / star-garlanded; clouds / your laughing breath.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The 2011 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist, part 1, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: The 2011 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist, part 2, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Friday: The Heir of Night by Helen Lowe, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein

4/18/11

Heroes of Tomorrow: A Diana Wynne Jones Retrospective, by Karen Healey
Column.
Diana Wynne Jones, who died last month, was brave. I don't know if she was brave in person, although tributes from friends, including Neil Gaiman and Emma Bull, indicate that she probably was. But she was certainly a brave writer.
Items Found in a Box Belonging to Jonas Connolly, by Laura E. Price
Fiction.
A woman swung toward us out of the sky on a knotted rope, a pistol in her free hand. The ocean roared around us; the hull sunk away from underneath us; my mother's grip on me shifted and tightened around my waist. "Hold tight," our rescuer said to us.
Serenissima, by Jo Walton
Poetry.
The half-masked man asserts that owls are luck.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Blood in the Water and Banners in the Wind by Juliet E. McKenna, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Home Fires by Gene Wolfe, reviewed by Matt Hilliard
Friday: All the Lives He Led by Frederick Pohl, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

4/11/11

Pataki (Part 2 of 2), by Nisi Shawl
Fiction.
It was almost midnight in Michigan, but Madrina had answered on the first ring: "Aboye abochiche." I lift your burdens to heaven. "Alaafia," she added; a wish for peace. "Rianne, what's troublin you?"
The Honey Man, by Alexandra Seidel
Poetry.
and it flows beneath their skin / like death.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Source Code, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: Racing the Dark and The Burning City by Alaya Dawn Johnson, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Friday: City of Ruin by Mark Charan Newton, reviewed by Nathaniel Katz

4/4/11

An Interview with Nisi Shawl, by JoSelle Vanderhooft
Article.
Science can preserve heritage as well as discover and explore it. A proper scientific approach can relieve us from prejudices that block us from understanding our cultural heritage.
Race, Again, Still, by Nisi Shawl
Column.
Sometimes race is the official topic of a given conversation, and sometimes it isn't. For many of us, though, race is always on our minds, in our hearts, at the tips of our tongues. It can't not be.
Pataki (Part 1 of 2), by Nisi Shawl
Fiction.
Now, though, a new leaf. A new life. A new career as a diviner. Rianne's ancestors had told her to take on any clients that came her way.
Medical History, by F.J. Bergmann
Poetry.
They say it is always sunny in there, although there are / clouds on the horizon. Occasionally someone will claim / to see mountains in the distance, and once a child said / he saw the turrets of a tiny city beyond the faraway hills.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Isaac Asimov Presents the Great SF Stories 3, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Wednesday: Meeks by Julia Holmes, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Friday: The Secret History of Fantasy, edited by Peter S. Beagle, reviewed by Chris Kammerud

3/28/11

Voices from a Shared World, by S. J. Chambers
Article.
"Shared worlds is about creative problem-solving, about every decision having consequences and leading to more decisions, about every solution affecting every aspect of the world. Everything goes into the stew of an imaginary world. Students pull on what they've learned in school, draw on their unique talents and interests. It's all blended together. And they get to do all that under the guidance of Wofford professors and some of the finest speculative fiction writers in the world. Can you imagine? Being fifteen-years-old and studying writing with Holly Black! That would've blown my mind as a teenager."
Dice and D-Pads: Tangled Up in Tie-Ins, by Robyn Fleming
Column.
The game-to-published-fiction stream doesn't flow just one way.
11th Hour Sonnet, by Andrew Kozma
Poetry.
All the doors are open. The earth / is rejecting the rain. Water tests our worth / through slow disintegration. All the cogs / of our lives have broken teeth.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Best of Kim Stanley Robinson, edited by Jonathan Strahan, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: A Handful of Pearls & Other Stories by Beth Bernobich, reviewed by Anil Menon
Friday: Battle: Los Angeles, reviewed by Adam Roberts

3/21/11

Lexias: A Century of Leiber, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
On December 24, 2010, Fritz Leiber turned 100. Having died in 1992, he wasn't around to blow out the candles, but here and there cognoscenti raised a toast to his memory.
起狮,行礼 (Rising Lion — The Lion Bows), by Zen Cho
Fiction.
When Coco told her the truth, she found it easy to believe. She demanded no proof. Jia Qi had already known that there was something magical about lion dance.
With Teeth, by Alexander Lumans
Poetry.
She molded your mouth too slight, your fins too fine; / the tide's shaping was tough on us both.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Among Others by Jo Walton, reviewed by Michael Levy
Wednesday: Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles by Michael Moorcock, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Friday: Sprawl, edited by Alisa Krasnostein, reviewed by Dan Hartland

3/14/11

Intertitles: Winter's Bone: A Mythic Marrow, by Genevieve Valentine
Column.
The film uses fairy-tale archetypes to define its stakes and provide markers for its hero's journey.
Trouble, by David M. deLeon
Fiction.
Now our eyes were used to the dark, about as open as they get, and she was right, the view was better than Cafe C. There were so many stars if I started counting em I'd lose my place and count em all over again.
This Apocalypse, by Andrea Blythe
Poetry.
Saucers hang like lazy silver cigars, each full / of little grey aliens with little grey zap guns. / The dead get up, take a stroll, and famished from their repose, / crack open skulls like walnuts.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Caprica, reviewed by Matthew Jones
Wednesday: Machine of Death: A Collection of Stories About People Who Know How They Will Die, edited by Ryan North, Matthew Bennardo, and David Malki !, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: The Fuller Memorandum by Charles Stross, reviewed by David McWilliam
Results of the 2010 Readers' Poll, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
And so, without further ado ...

3/7/11

Diffractions: Soil, Water, and Pure Air, by Vandana Singh
Column.
So there I was, at the age of seventeen, climbing a cliff in the Himalayas in the middle of the night.
The Last Sophia, by C.S.E. Cooney
Fiction.
I came under enemy enchantment at the soft age of fourteen. For some reason it pleased the Gentry that I should breed their changeling babes, will me nil me, and breed them I have, though I had little else to do with them.
The City That Wasn't There, by Alexandra Seidel
Poetry.
You / are here now as you have been / in different incarnations
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe by Charles Yu, reviewed by Richard Larson
Wednesday: The Restoration Game by Ken MacLeod, reviewed by Andy Sawyer
Friday: Rivers of London/Midnight Riot by Ben Aaronovitch, reviewed by Duncan Lawie

2/28/11

Comic-Con 2010, by Mark Newheiser
Article.
The question currently under debate is whether artistic depictions of something that would be horribly offensive in real life should be legal? Both the legality and social value of the material is a topic of debate, as to whether the material provides an outlet for something that shouldn't exist in real life or whether it encourages it. One of the volunteers I chat with talks about how she's uncomfortable with a lot of material herself, but she believes people have a right to express anything they want to in art, she thinks it's a slippery slope to censor artistic depictions of anything.
Scores, by John Clute
Column.
I think I smell homework.
Surreal Fortune, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
Adjust the rearview mirror / until you see apothegms / swirling in your tailwind.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Empress of Eternity by L.E. Modesitt Jr., reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Wednesday: The Ghostwriter by Zoran Živković, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Friday: Farlander by Col Buchanan, reviewed by C. B. Harvey

2/21/11

Let the Sci-Fi Flag Fly, by Karen Healey
Column.
In adult fiction, speculative fiction of surpassing intelligence, craft and appeal is often overlooked by critics and award committees alike. But that doesn't necessarily hold true of young adult genre work.
The Yew's Embrace, by Francesca Forrest
Fiction.
We could still see the old king's blood in the cracks in the flagstones beneath the new king's feet when he announced to us all that this was a unification, not a conquest.
At the Duck Convention, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
siren-singing death-dealing / traitors to the flocks,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Feed by Mira Grant, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: Game of Cage by Harry Connolly, reviewed by William Mingin
Friday: Sacred Space: The Quest for Transcendence in Science Fiction Film and Television by Douglas E. Cowan, reviewed by Raz Greenberg

2/14/11

Widows in the World (part 2 of 2), by Gavin J. Grant
Fiction.
She'd never liked her mother's houses. Even when she'd cracked the codes in order to program her own spaces, she had always known the deep programming wasn't hers. She'd been forced old so fast that by the time she was twelve she wanted her own place.
The Dream Police, by Lyn C. A. Gardner
Poetry.
We're working through the walls, our thoughts / Drills honed diamond-fine by delta waves,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Last Song of Orpheus by Robert Silverberg, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Wednesday: Seven Cities of Gold by David Moles, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: Cryoburn by Lois McMaster Bujold, reviewed by Kelly Jennings

2/7/11

Widows in the World (part 1 of 2), by Gavin J. Grant
Fiction.
The Granny put the gun down. She picked up her embroidery, told the house, "Let's move." She kickstarted her rocking chair as she felt the baby kicking inside. The carpet was soaking up the mess her mother's body was making. The rest of the family wives muttered as the house trembled, withdrew its roots from England's northernmost tip, checked for clearance, and slowly took off.
The Three Daughters, by Suzanne Fischer
Poetry.
White rosebush, red rosebush. / Shiny adze, spade, dug out / gold sepals but no blossoms.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Deep State by Walter Jon Williams, reviewed by Roz Kaveney
Wednesday: My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales, edited by Kate Bernheimer, reviewed by Sara Polsky
Friday: The Heroes by Joe Abercrombie, reviewed by Niall Alexander

1/31/11

Mythpunk Roundtable, by JoSelle Vanderhooft
Article.
"I think that, as someone who read and writes predominantly in English, my entrance to myths of many different cultures has been informed by a great deal of systemic ignorance and prejudice, such that before I can punk the myth, I need to be aware of what peoples' myths ABOUT myths are, and possibly punk on two fronts."
Introduction to The Third Wish, by Jed Hartman
Fiction.
Introduction to this week's reprinted story.
The Third Wish, by Joan Aiken
Fiction.
"I have yet to hear of the human being who made any good use of his three wishes—they mostly end up worse off than they started."
Shoe, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
God was maybe loosening His boot / or something / so He could massage His bunions
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Cold Magic by Kate Elliott, reviewed by Edward James
Wednesday: The Small Hand by Susan Hill, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Friday: After Dark by Haruki Murakami, reviewed by Nathaniel Katz

1/24/11

Mythpunk: An Interview with Catherynne M. Valente, by JoSelle Vanderhooft
Article.
"I felt that there was a commonality in some of the up-and-coming writers of whom I was a part, that a Thing was Going On, and mythpunk seemed concise and fairly clear on the face of it what it meant."
Dark Matter, by Timons Esaias
Poetry.
knows that it's just one / more damn thing his kind / will have to straighten out;
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Monsters, reviewed by Matthew Jones
Wednesday: The Half-Made World by Felix Gilman, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Friday: Jaclyn the Ripper by Karl Alexander, reviewed by Aishwarya Subramanian

1/17/11

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
It's too bad equipoise sounds so much like a noun.
Pinion, by Stellan Thorne
Fiction.
"I was robbed by an angel last night."
The Skin Walker's Wife, by Lisa M. Bradley
Poetry.
She notes how this one fits inside her / fits so familiar inside his skin / not like her husband: stretching bone / and gristle beyond their limits
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Wednesday: Tron: Legacy, reviewed by Shaun Duke
Friday: Clockwork Phoenix 3: New Tales of Beauty and Strangeness, edited by Mike Allen, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin

1/10/11

Ten Years of Sexing the Body, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
My tendency to be my own Devil's Advocate came out with a vengeance recently as I tried, and failed, to write a tenth anniversary appreciation of a book I love: Sexing the Body by Anne Fausto-Sterling.
The Space Between Stars, by Cassandra Clarke
Fiction.
I was a young man then, and I lived underground and served my country in ways I can't confess to, under the threat of fines and imprisonment, and you talked to me one night in a bar in a city built entirely out of neon and luck. A city of no substance. The best thing about Las Vegas was always you.
Merlin, by Lorraine Schein
Poetry.
I am a time bomb, set to detonate / into an unknown future.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 80! Memories and Reflections on Ursula K. Le Guin, edited by Karen Joy Fowler and Debbie Notkin, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Up the Bright River by Philip Jose Farmer, reviewed by Chris Kammerud
Friday: The Shadow Pavilion and The Iron Khan by Liz Williams, reviewed by Kelly Jennings

1/3/11

Source Decay, by Charlie Jane Anders
Fiction.
"How could you?" Tara screamed when she reached their table. "How could you run around with her? In public? And she's my best friend!" Roberta was not Tara's best friend, although they had taken a pottery class together, years ago.
Cold War Champions: Bobby Fischer and Yuri Gagarin Descend to Earth, by Mary A. Turzillo
Poetry.
Both circled the earth: / Fischer prowled its surface with his void passport; / Gagarin soared above on metal and fire.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 2010 in Review, by Our Reviewers
Wednesday: Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Friday: In the Mean Time by Paul Tremblay, reviewed by Richard Larson
Strange Horizons in 2011, by Niall Harrison
Editorial.
Since taking over from Susan a couple of months ago, I've been working on various projects, and the first of them see the light this week.

12/20/10

Salsa Nocturna, by Daniel Jos� Older
Fiction.
A little after midnight, the muertos show up. They're always in their Sunday best, dressed to the nines, as they say, in pinstriped suits and fancy dresses.
The Rabbit Catcher, by Marina Lee Sable
Poetry.
the bald moon / retreats / eclipsed by clouds
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Folding Knife and Blue and Gold by K.J. Parker, reviewed by Tanya Brown
Wednesday: The Mammoth Book of Alternate Histories, edited by Ian Watson and Ian Whates, reviewed by Tony Keen
Friday: Antiphon by Ken Scholes, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin

12/13/10

Teenagers with Bite, Part 2, by Karen Healey
Column.
I hereby present a brief selection of my favourite recent YA vampire novels.
Zookrollers Winkelden Ook, by Tracy Canfield
Fiction.
Jason Fischer-Varon hated to block email from his dead husband, but he was getting over a hundred of them a day, and they were breaking his heart.
Life Lessons, by Emily Jiang
Poetry.
She told you / the secret of your father's / dragon, how its teeth hold / warriors ready to defend / the city in time of need.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Best of Larry Niven, edited by Jonathan Strahan, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Dark Matter by Michelle Paver, reviewed by Niall Alexander
Friday: The Reapers are the Angels by Alden Bell and The Loving Dead by Amelia Beamer, reviewed by Richard Larson

12/6/10

Teenagers with Bite, by Karen Healey
Column.
I recently discovered, very late to the party, The Vampire Diaries TV series.
Lily, by Emily Gilman
Fiction.
Lily was, to all appearances, a twenty-something-year-old girl staring dreamily out the window: the fact that she was even sitting here on a train was proof that she could pass for human.
The Music of Deep Spacers, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
Yet when the last call comes and / the lights flicker, and cafes / and dim bars are shutting down, / the music all at once changes / to a vast and haunting refrain
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Lightborn by Tricia Sullivan, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Wednesday: Guardians of Paradise by Jaine Fenn, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Friday: Walking the Tree by Kaaron Warren, reviewed by Matt Denault

11/29/10

No Return Address, by Sigrid Ellis
Fiction.
Two months you've been missing, and now I get this. Just this. This postcard, with no return address, no note, just a postmark from Madrid, Spain, and your initials.
Becoming, by Kate Marshall
Poetry.
I've been walking now for years. I have / a perfect map of Paris tattooed / on the sole of my left foot. / I wrote your name on a curl of paper and burned it / where Caesar fell.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Noise by Darin Bradley, reviewed by Matt Denault
Wednesday: The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake by Aimee Bender, reviewed by Chris Kammerud
Friday: The Japenese Devil Fish Girl and Other Unnatural Attractions by Robert Rankin, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont

11/22/10

Terra Incognita: A Brief History of Mexican Science Fiction, by Silvia Moreno-Garcia
Article.
Mexican science fiction scholar Gabriel Trujillo Muñoz, for his part, maintains that Mexican science fiction "has a desire to give voice and a national flavor to our characters and situations they live. There is a nervous tic that imposes our black humor onto the future. . . a desire to destroy the country and send the political classes to hell. . . there are too many apocalypses in our science fiction and few utopias."
Blood, Blood (part 2 of 2), by Abbey Mei Otis
Fiction.
I lean into his blows. Each punch he lands unmoors me a little more. If I can turn every inch of my body to bruise. Convert the entirety of my flesh to pain. Then by default, the mysterious points of anchor will sever. I will rise into the air.
Jin-Roh: Wolves in Human Armor, by Jeannine Hall Gailey
Poetry.
You resemble a young girl I knew / and failed to kill. They picked you out, / called you a terrorist, ran you ragged.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Generosity by Richard Powers, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Believe in People: The Essential Karel Čapek, reviewed by Michael Froggatt
Friday: King Maker by Maurice Broaddus, reviewed by Sara Polsky

11/15/10

Blood, Blood (part 1 of 2), by Abbey Mei Otis
Fiction.
I'm sixteen when George and I figure out the aliens will pay to watch us fight.
Relativity, by Cassie Beasley
Poetry.
You will wear your watch backwards, / the time against your pulse, / polished back outwards, to catch / the reflections of planets like marbles / fading into the black.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Lifecycle of Software Objects by Ted Chiang and Zendegi by Greg Egan, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Wednesday: Bearings by Gary K. Wolfe, reviewed by Nick Hubble
Friday: Half World by Hiromi Goto, reviewed by Michael Levy

11/8/10

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
1940 is not to be alternated with.
Household Spirits, by C.S.E. Cooney
Fiction.
This here's ghost country, just like you said. Can't imagine a more haunted place on all Athanor, no, nor at the bottom of the nine seas where the nine old cities fell. Frontier, we call it. Makes it sound like it'd never been lived on, never been worked. But you look hard enough, you see signs everywhere.
A Life in the Day Of, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
I will love you, she said, / like Darwin loved evolution. / Things change.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Isaac Asimov Presents the Great SF Stories 2, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Wednesday: Six Views of Never Let Me Go, by Matthew Cheney
Friday: Sleepless by Charlie Huston, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum

11/1/10

Betting on the LHC: The Large Hadron Collider and the Future of Physics, by Lori Ann White
Article.
Great days, bad days, go-home-and-kick-your-dog days, Nobel Prize-winning days—it's a safe bet that the LHC will deliver all these days and more, but how the moods of particle physicists translate into scientific discoveries is another question. And not just particle physicists, but high energy physicists, condensed matter physicists, theoretical physicists, cosmologists, astrophysicists—physicists from almost every field are waiting to see what the LHC will find.
Endings and Beginnings, by Susan Marie Groppi
Column.
Hokkaido Green, by Aidan Doyle
Fiction.
After his brother died, Hitoshi Watanabe quit his job and decided to walk to the hot spring waterfall at the end of the world.
Space Junk, by Marina Lee Sable
Poetry.
You wonder if radar will pick / you up as a spectral shadow
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Subtle Bodies by Peter Dubé, reviewed by Anil Menon
Wednesday: The Midnight Mayor by Kate Griffin, reviewed by William Mingin
Friday: Salvage by Robert Edric, reviewed by David Hebblethwaite

10/25/10

Searching for Bigfoot in Alabama, by Pamela Manasco
Article.
The South has a reputation—not undeserved—of being a deeply religious area, but it also revels in folklore, supernatural or otherwise. There's a reason why Anne Rice and Charlaine Harris set their separate vampire stories in the South: supernatural tales, like kudzu, thrive here.
What We Left Behind in Jacksonville, by Colleen Mondor
Fiction.
It was a good place for us; there was no reason to think it wasn't a good move. That's important--we had no idea, no sign, that there could be anything wrong with our house. And then, one night the radio came on by itself.
The Utterance of a Fluorescent Saguaro Rouses "Ignatz Mouse" From Turpitudinous Slumber, by Martin Hazelbower
Poetry.
As sure as every yearning brick you heft awaits its flight— / or sure as one may trust a cactoid exegesis on the hearts of bricks—
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Autumn Rain by David J. Williams, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Wednesday: A Book of Tongues by Gemma Files, reviewed by Tanya Brown
Friday: Return by Peter S. Beagle, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

10/18/10

2010: The Year We Lower Our Expectations, by Gary Westfahl
Article.
It remains unclear when humans might again walk on the Moon. However, it will manifestly require more than a decade to move from the drawing board to a countdown, even though we once did it more quickly. Thus, 2010: Odyssey Two may represent the first anticipation of the counterintuitive principle that a repeated space mission might involve more preparation time than the original mission.
Styx Water and a Sippy Cup, by Hal Duncan
Fiction.
The formula feed is basically cold water, but the babe still locks his cherub lips around the rubber teat like it's the mother's breast he'll never now taste. They always do, right enough. Who doesn't love the sweet salt tang of the Cocytus, river of lamentations? Who in Hell doesn't love the liquor we all live on, the quenching, quieting tears of the bereaved?
Amphisbaena, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
At least until each head / decides, like some inbred prince, / it can strike / the truer course.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Dervish House by Ian McDonald, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Happy Snak by Nicole Kimberling, reviewed by Jude Roberts
Friday: Collected Stories by Lewis Shiner, reviewed by Jason Erik Lundberg

10/11/10

The Failure of Masculinity, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
I had something else ready for this column, but then I read a story in the New York Times with this opening paragraph: "It started with a Twitter message on Sept. 19: 'Roommate asked for the room till midnight. I went into molly's room and turned on my webcam. I saw him making out with a dude. Yay.'"
Last of the Monsters, by Emily C. Skaftun
Fiction.
I laughed when the gods died out. One by one, they crawled off like dogs to die alone, and I danced on their unmarked graves.
Quiet in Her Mind, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
Years afterward, the whispers started. Starlight / turned them shrill as crystal in her head,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Yukikaze by Chohei Kambayashi, reviewed by Andy Sawyer
Wednesday: Stone Spring by Stephen Baxter, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Friday: Diana Comet and Other Improbable Stories by Sandra McDonald, reviewed by Anil Menon

10/4/10

Out of Your Head: The Lure of Trepanation, by Tim Hardwick
Article.
It's no secret the daily grind has us spiritually starved. Health experts report that white-collar suicide rates have reached an all-time high. And while statistics suggest that a tendency to religiosity has a protective effect, faith is hard to manufacture. For a generation reared on personal growth and psychic development, however, alternatives abound. Some go in for crystal healing; others take up yoga classes. Not a few have recourse to drugs. Betty Lyons drilled a hole in her head.
Seven Sexy Cowboy Robots, by Sandra McDonald
Fiction.
When I was a much younger woman, as part of the divorce settlement from my then-millionaire inventor husband, I asked for our house in Connecticut, a modest amount of alimony, and six sexy cowboy robots. Sentient sex toys, if you will.
The Moss Man, by Pat Tompkins
Poetry.
Sleep descended from exhaustion after a day's labor, / the warehoused rows of young victims, whimpering. / Nil, nix. How did you dream in a red brick asylum?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Holy Machine by Chris Beckett, reviewed by Michael Levy
Wednesday: Silversands by Gareth L. Powell, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Friday: Crossing Over by Anna Kendall, reviewed by Hallie O'Donovan

9/27/10

Zombies are Just Undead Gentlemen: An Interview with The Widow's Bane, by Molly Tanzer
Article.
"A zombie is just an undead gentleman with a chip on his shoulder. But to think that we're illiterate, or can't walk faster than one mile an hour . . . it's ridiculous. We're quite articulate. We mind our manners. And we prefer fois gras to brains."
Over My Shoulder (part 2 of 2), by David Sklar
Fiction.
If I was going to give it up, I needed to give it all up, to leave myself no way back.
Pangea Restored, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
First to achieve substantiality, rising to the surface / like Atlantis reborn, is her core personality,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Secret Feminist Cabal: A Cultural History of Science Fiction Feminisms by Helen Merrick, reviewed by Claire Brialey
Wednesday: Wolfsangel by M. D. Lachlan, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Friday: 2017 by Olga Slavnikova, reviewed by Michael Froggatt

9/20/10

Scores, by John Clute
Column.
It is dreadful to be here at last, here at the zero moment of history that lasts forever, now that Satan has finally touched down after aeons of fall, it is hell.
Over My Shoulder (part 1 of 2), by David Sklar
Fiction.
"It's going to be a hit," he said. "You want the royalties?" I asked. Vespers smiled like a serpent staring at more than most mouths could swallow. "No," he said. "I want the destiny."
Leviathans, by C.S. MacCath
Poetry.
Now slick leviathans spew from the sediment; / mephitic fiends, nameless, insensate, / pitchy tentacles undulating inland,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Our Tragic Universe by Scarlett Thomas, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: A Matter of Blood by Sarah Pinborough, reviewed by David McWilliam
Friday: The Evolutionary Void by Peter F. Hamilton, reviewed by Karen Burnham

9/13/10

Tenth Anniversary Highlights: The Fantasy of Talking Back: Susanna Clarke's Historical Present in Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell, originally published 27 October 2008, by Elizabeth Hoiem
Article.
At the center of Susanna Clarke's historical novel are three characters, each a victim of Strange and Norrell's project to promote magic as rational and "English," and each corresponding to a social group historically marginalized in order to solidify Englishness as a cohesive category of identity[.]
Tenth Anniversary Highlights: Elven Lays and Power Chords: Chaos, Revelry, and Community in Tolkien-Themed Heavy Metal, originally published 12 January 2009, by Stephanie Green
Article.
With the added dimension of female vocals, Battlelore has an opportunity—unlike most other Tolkien metal bands—to explore Tolkien's representation of females. As a man often noted for his portrayal of virginal and "pure" maidens who have no place in the war of men (Skeparnides 2002), Tolkien has found a friend in heavy metal.
Iteration, by John Kessel
Fiction.
At home that night Enzo received an anonymous email headlined "Re-invent the world." No text—just a link.
The Second Room, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Who was it that said human / beings never conceptualized / the notion of ghosts
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Love Songs for the Shy and Cynical by Robert Shearman, reviewed by Paul Raven
Wednesday: The Thief of Broken Toys by Tim Lebbon, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Friday: Ondine, reviewed by T. S. Miller

9/6/10

Ten Years of Speculative Non-Fiction, by Articles Editors
Article.
With this in mind, we announce that SH Articles will now be accepting submissions for creative and experimental non-fiction that engages the themes, genres, and concerns of speculative fiction. We are looking for intelligent, experimental pieces with critical content enhanced by personal experiences or reactions from the writer. Much like "new journalism" in the 60s and 70s, we want pieces that actively engage speculative fiction from the perspective of an insider and participant.
The Condition of a Monster: A Personal Taxonomy of Supernatural Fiction, by Orrin Grey
Article.
To put it another way, the thing that makes a vampire interesting in a supernatural story is not that it will suck your blood, but that it is a vampire at all. That it is a teratism, a thing outside of commonly accepted possibility. The better such a creature is understood, the more bound in rules it is, the more pedestrian and commonplace it becomes and, therefore, the less supernatural.
And She Shall Be Crowned According to Her Station, by Genevieve Valentine
Fiction.
The first roach appears in the sink, mahogany-dark and glossy against the stainless steel. Jessie grabs a sponge and slams it down, listens for the crunch of wings.
Improving on Nature, by Joanne Merriam
Poetry.
while other robots come and go,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Doctor Who: Series Five, reviewed by Matthew Jones
Wednesday: Stories edited by Neil Gaiman and Al Sarrantonio, reviewed by Chris Kammerud
Friday: Triumff: Her Majesty's Hero by Dan Abnett, reviewed by William Mingin

8/30/10

Aphrodisia, by Lavie Tidhar
Fiction.
We'd shared a hub in Tong Yun City years before, the asteroid-worm and the orbital hafmek and me—shared food and drugs and sex and minds—but we were younger then, on Mars.
Sestina for Death, by James S. Dorr
Poetry.
But, ah, this is a wake and so we drink
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Narrative Power: Encounters, Celebrations, Struggles, edited by L. Timmel Duchamp, reviewed by Anil Menon
Wednesday: The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson, reviewed by Niall Alexander
Friday: Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, reviewed by Martin Lewis

8/23/10

Written in Maps, by Cécile Cristofari
Article.
Ever since J. R. R. Tolkien put his imprint on the fantasy genre, maps have become a staple in helping speculative fiction authors share their imagined world with the audience. Yet even as they provide this crutch to the reader, the location of maps outside the narrative raises questions about their literary significance. How does the map contribute to the creation of the invented geography? Are thematic dimensions of the narrative present on the map? And what sort of perspective does a map's author represent?
Five Rules for Commuting to the Underworld, by Merrie Haskell
Fiction.
If you undertake your travels to the Underworld while you are yet a living being, you may wish to sew your mouth closed--black thread is best. It is the surest way to avoid the temptations and escape with your soul intact.
Thrice, by Yoon Ha Lee
Poetry.
icebird's sharp feather / firebird's charred talon
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Above the Snowline by Steph Swainston, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Toy Story 3, reviewed by David J. Schwartz
Friday: The Red Tree by Caitlin R. Kiernan, reviewed by Audrey Homan

8/16/10

An Interview with Jonathan Maberry, by John Ottinger III
Article.
Zombies aren't charming, and they don't have personalities. They're walking corpses with no higher functions. They certainly aren't romantic. What they represent in zombie fiction is a constant and universal threat that is implacable and unbearable. That kind of threat puts all of the characters under pressure, and from a storytelling point of view, characters under pressure are the only interesting ones to write about.
Real Action, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Seeing Christopher Nolan's movie Inception got me reflecting on his previous summer blockbuster, The Dark Knight, a film I vehemently disliked when I first saw it in the theatre . . .
The Big Splash, by George R. Galuschak
Fiction.
"I thought you might be able to help him." I tried to keep the tremble out of my voice. "Maybe reverse the aging process. You're an alien and all."
Of Ithaca & Ice, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
I wandered the asphodel stars
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Red Plenty by Francis Spufford, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Mammoths of the Great Plains and Tomb of the Fathers by Eleanor Arnason, reviewed by Kelly Jennings
Friday: Shine edited by Jetse de Vries, reviewed by Karen Burnham

8/9/10

The X-Files: Faith and Paranoia in America, by Cynthia C. Scott
Article.
The show's real strengths weren't in the conspiracy itself, but in Mulder and Scully's relationship and the way they bonded through the fog of obfuscation, lies, and cover ups. "The truth is out there" became the series' hopeful message: that the truth found in faith and love can never be concealed as long as the faithful are genuine in their ideals.
Scores, by John Clute
Column.
Rajaniemi's brilliant first novel is more device than story.
Ghost of a Horse Under a Chandelier, by Georgina Bruce
Fiction.
It's easy to lose the Book because it's always changing. There isn't an author's name on the cover. And every time Zillah opens the Book it's different. Everything is different, even the title. Today, it starts like this.
Egyptian Sparks, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
On the night spur / between Kharga and Kena,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Dark Matter by Peter Straub, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: Inception, reviewed by William Mingin
Friday: X6 edited by Keith Stevenson, reviewed by Richard Larson

8/2/10

Where It Ends, by Swapna Kishore
Fiction.
God, he looked so old. What had gone wrong?
Primer to Impractical Magic, by Robert Frazier
Poetry.
Besides dosing with both eyes of newt / and a big pinch of Ma's Organic Loveroot
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Under the Dome by Stephen King, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Through the Drowsy Dark by Rachel Swirsky, reviewed by Sara Polsky
Friday: Pinion by Jay Lake, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

7/26/10

Father's Day, by Jen Larsen
Fiction.
My father spent years building his Doomsday Machine.
Picturing World Peace on Earth Day, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
I think about a bumper sticker I once saw: / "Picture Whirled Peas."
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Passage by Justin Cronin, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Wednesday: Finch by Jeff VanderMeer, reviewed by David McWilliam
Friday: Slum Online by Hiroshi Sakurazaka, reviewed by Anil Menon

7/19/10

The Bright and Shining Parasites of Guiyu (part 2 of 2), by Grady Hendrix
Fiction.
One of Mayor Yuen's tough guys took me and Little Bun to the elevators. There was classical Western music playing inside it. What good is classical music? You can't break to it.
Only So Many, by Rebecca Del Giorgio
Poetry.
trading in the station wagon for / gilded wheels and wild eyed horses
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Chill by Elizabeth Bear, reviewed by Matt Denault
Wednesday: Ruby's Spoon by Anna Lawrence Pietroni, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Friday: Servant of the Underworld by Aliette de Bodard, reviewed by Duncan Lawie

7/12/10

The Bright and Shining Parasites of Guiyu (part 1 of 2), by Grady Hendrix
Fiction.
I say Little Bun swerved all over the street but there are no streets in Guiyu. The electronic mountains have buried the town in a sea of broken hardware and we drove down canyons cut through towering walls of high-tech trash.
Impressions and Indentations, by Jeff Jeppesen
Poetry.
A first predator, first nightmare, first symptom of madness
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Shirley Jackson: Novels and Stories, edited by Joyce Carol Oates, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: The 2009 Shirley Jackson Award Best Novel shortlist, part one, by Richard Larson
Friday: The Shirley Jackson Award for Best Novel of 2009, by Richard Larson

7/5/10

The Red Bride, by Samantha Henderson
Fiction.
The story of the Red Bride is a slave's tale in slave speech, which I do not generally hold in my head around humans lest my face betray me, so I must shift words around from one meaning to another like stones on a reckoning-board, each stone taking meaning from a square where another stone was a moment before.
Vincent and Miranda, by Matthew Stranach
Poetry.
But sometimes he longed to / Peel back the perfect fibreglass skin / To unplug Miranda and leave her
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Woo of Lost, by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: A Game of Lost, by Bernadette Lynn Bosky
Friday: Two Views: The Devil's Alphabet by Daryl Gregory, reviewed by Michael Froggatt and David J. Schwartz

6/28/10

Lost Weekend in Brighton: A Report on World Horror Convention 2010, by Anya Martin
Article.
By convention's end, a consensus definitely had emerged that this WHC 2010 was one of the best World Horror Cons to date thanks to the abundance of authors, artists, and publishing professionals; a strong and varied programming slate geared to both professionals and readers; and a committed, hardworking staff led by Con Chair Amanda Foubister and Assistant Chair/Programming/Publications Stephen Jones, grand maestro of numerous award-winning horror anthologies and a fixture on the fantasy and horror convention scene since the 1980s.
Scores, by John Clute
Column.
The secret of Robert A. Heinlein and Cory Doctorow is that they think SF is true.
Out of Sombra Canyon, by Kyri Freeman
Fiction.
In four days, we haven't recaptured any of the hummingbirds we've banded, or even seen one a second time. Without that, we have no way of tracking their movements, learning their behavior, what territory they need.
Fathom, by J. C. Runolfson
Poetry.
she wears a dress like waves // dark and churning
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Inter-Galactic Playground by Farah Mendlesohn, reviewed by William Mingin
Wednesday: New Model Army by Adam Roberts, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Friday: Cheek by Jowl by Ursula K Le Guin and Imagination/Space by Gwyneth Jones, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

6/21/10

Aboriginal Lovecraft, by C�cile Cristofari
Article.
At the end of his life, Lovecraft apparently abandoned the mysterious, marvelous, and occasionally frightening country of dreams in order to depict a world invaded by terrifying aliens, for whom mankind is nothing. Does that mean that he turned away from the world of dreams for good?
Narrative Realities: A Symphony in Four Books, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Reading multiple books at once inevitably causes words, phrases, entire paragraphs to pose and juxtapose and interpose and superimpose, to dance and breed, until the reader's mind is either a cacophony of a symphony, and the closed covers of books resting on a table or the floor cannot silence all the notes they've got to share.
How to Make Friends in Seventh Grade, by Nick Poniatowski
Fiction.
We knew that our stupid model rockets wouldn't be able to reach the Watchers, and she knew that we knew. But Mrs. Hildegaard had taught kindergarten for fifteen years before teaching science at East Junior High, and old habits die hard. So she gave us our assignment with the conceit that our spray-painted tubes of cardboard would somehow have enough force to break through Earth's atmosphere and grab the Watchers' attention.
Radio Banquo, by Sonya Taaffe
Poetry.
the stations spin like cooling stars
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: And Another Thing. . . by Eoin Colfer, reviewed by Andy Sawyer
Wednesday: Tome of the Undergates by Sam Sykes, reviewed by Peter Whitfield
Friday: Bitter Angels by C. L. Anderson, reviewed by Kelly Jennings

6/14/10

When Lost Went Gently into that Good Night, by James Schellenberg
Column.
One of the weirdest mainstream shows ever gets a (fitting?) conclusion.
The Night Train, by Lavie Tidhar
Fiction.
Her name wasn't Molly and she didn't wear shades, reflective or otherwise.
Counting Sheep, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
the entire endless uncounted lot / queued up all the way back to infinity / waiting for a simple turn to jump
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Monsters of Men by Patrick Ness, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: Spellbent by Lucy A. Snyder, reviewed by Sara Polsky
Friday: The World House by Guy Adams, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont

6/7/10

Kifli, by Rose Lemberg
Fiction.
My fingers knead the kifli dough, caress the living firmness of it. The plum jam is bubbling on the gas stove, smelling of that village, that little plump woman I would have become, had I not moved across the ocean.
Some Zombies One Should Avoid, by G. O. Clark
Poetry.
Radio talk show zombies— / who babble on throughout the night / to their half-conscious listeners,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Isaac Asimov Presents the Great SF Stories 1, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Wednesday: The Push by Dave Hutchinson, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Friday: Under in the Mere by Catherynne M Valente, reviewed by Anil Menon

5/31/10

Waiting, by Eilis O'Neal
Fiction.
"She was a swordsman. The best of her time. She served the Emperor Janken, led his warriors into battle. Won the battles, all of them. They say she was like a blade herself, as sharp and keen-edged and quick, as if she were made of steel and lightning. She disappeared. They looked, but they never found her."
Requiem for the Tooth Fairy, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
While I have yet to pick my weapon of / ultimate dispatch —
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Mr Shivers by Robert Jackson Bennett and The Kingom of Ohio by Matthew Flaming, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: The Trade of Queens by Charles Stross, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Friday: Chimerascope by Douglas Smith, reviewed by T. S. Miller

5/24/10

The Power of Imagination: An Interview with Keith Brooke, by Mike Revell
Article.
You have to push yourself every time you sit down to write; you should make everything you produce better than the last thing; you need to be your own toughest critic and you need to learn from the things you're still not getting right. And you have to be stubborn as hell.
Where We Come From; Who We Become, by Karen Healey
Column.
Families! They're sort of like credit cards: I can't live with them, and I can't write young adult fiction without them.
On Not Going Extinct, by Carol Emshwiller
Fiction.
Our language is gone, though here and there a word survives. Some of our music and dance also. Sometimes we see bits of our ways in what the others do, a gesture here and there, a fragment of a design at the edge of a collar or on a belt buckle.
Time Machine, by Alexandra Wells
Poetry.
Head for the Altai mountains / But leave the souvenirs in the middens; / The locals are quick with an axe.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Pretty Monsters by Kelly Link, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Survivors, reviewed by C. B. Harvey
Friday: Lifelode by Jo Walton, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

5/17/10

The People Could Fly: An Interview with Nnedi Okorafor, by Ibi Aanu Zoboi
Article.
I think all children need to have time and space to dream. Yes, even American ones. Just because a story isn’t written specifically for you, does not mean you can’t relate to it. If that were the case, growing up, I’d have had nothing to read.
Scores, by John Clute
Column.
The first thing that comes to mind on reading Ajvaz is story. But maybe that is what this reviewer always says.
Worlds Apart, by Marlaina Gray
Fiction.
My parents discovered the gateway first, when they were young.
Lizards and Wind, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
The lizards were like / lemmings rushing / blindly over a cliff side:
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Poison Eaters and Other Stories by Holly Black, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: The Dream of Perpetual Motion by Dexter Palmer, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Friday: Directive 51 by John Barnes, reviewed by Kelly Jennings

5/10/10

Change of Habit, Change of Taste, by James Schellenberg
Column.
I feel like I now have more second-hand knowledge of books than first-hand. I'm not particularly comfortable with that.
WE HEART VAMPIRES!!!!!! (part 2 of 2), by Meghan McCarron
Fiction.
It was, in a confusing way, even more intimate than a kiss.
The Planet of Ideal Readers, by F.J. Bergmann
Poetry.
Small arthropods, with pink eyes / on writhing yellow stalks, they are / permanently curious. They watch
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Horns by Joe Hill and Neverland by Douglas Clegg, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Wednesday: Dragon Haven by Robin Hobb, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein
Friday: Metro 2033 by Dmitry Glukhovsky, reviewed by Michael Froggatt

5/3/10

Interview: Perfumer Gary Lodato, by JoSelle Vanderhooft
Article.
It's about finding a connection. Connecting. Connecting to the product. Connecting to the theme. To the emotions. To the creativity. It's not just about mixing perfumes. It's about the process. The life breathed into the final product. I want my customers to feel it. To connect to it.
WE HEART VAMPIRES!!!!!! (part 1 of 2), by Meghan McCarron
Fiction.
Sven was Bob's vampire boyfriend. It had been his idea to meet up at the mall. George had no idea why a vampire wanted to hang out at the mall, but maybe malls were really interesting to someone born in the nineteenth century.
Various Horses, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
The rocking horse dreams of riding the carousel
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Rats and the Ruling Sea by Robert V. S. Redick, reviewed by Anil Menon
Wednesday: Imagination/Space: Essays and Talks on Fiction, Feminism, Technology, and Politics by Gwyneth Jones, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Friday: Memoirs of a Master Forger by William Heaney, reviewed by Michael Levy

4/26/10

Interview: Perfumer Vajra Wright, by JoSelle Vanderhooft
Article.
e connect as people through myth and image—it's powerful and universal stuff. And it lends itself perfectly to fragrance. No other sense can invoke involuntary memories like the olfactory system, and I postulate that the right fragrance for the right person can, in fact, connect them to the Collective Unconscious—the universal image bank we all share as part of being human.
Patriarchy Studies, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Guns and feminism have been a common element of my life for a long time. I owe my openness to feminism to Isaac Asimov, who wrote in one of his books (or in an editorial for Asimov's, maybe) that he was a proud supporter of the feminist cause and was even willing to call himself a feminist. When I was twelve years old, that was good enough for me, and it kept me from associating the word "feminism" with anything negative—I worshipped Isaac Asimov, and if he said the word was a good one, I believed him.
The Freedom, by K M Lawrence
Fiction.
I jerked the head back a bit. As often happens, the reflex brought with it the feeling that the body was truly mine.
Linnaeus Names Theobroma cacao, by J. C. Runolfson
Poetry.
from the land of clocks and milk maids
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The 2010 Arthur C. Clarke Award shortlist, reviewed by Dan Hartland (part one)
Wednesday: The 2010 Arthur C. Clarke Award shortlist, reviewed by Dan Hartland (part two)
Friday: The Age of Ra by James Lovegrove, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy

4/19/10

Birds, by Benjamin Parzybok
Fiction.
I live in a world that I create. In my world--you've noticed, don't say you haven't--a passing crow might stop and have a conversation about a change in schedule at the city trash pickup, or, for example, the pigeons. It's a world I want to live in, all the rules are mine. Don't argue yet.
Tweaking the World Bundle (Comstock's Synopsis of Improbable Events), by David C. Kopaska-Merkel and Kendall Evans
Poetry.
The transformation of Mr. Unger was accomplished / In a nanosecond
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Cloud & Ashes by Greer Gilman, reviewed by Justina Robson
Wednesday: Cold Earth by Sarah Moss, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Friday: Sandman Slim by Richard Kadrey, reviewed by Audrey Homan

4/12/10

Herding Zombies: A Roundtable Discussion, by S.J. Chambers
Article.
My other theory is that zombies are funny because they have a far more limited sex appeal. Werewolves, vampires, ghosts, fallen angels, demons, succubi: on the surface, all these monsters are more universally dangerous/sexy and thus more able to be conceptualized as a lover by a large segment of the population. It really takes a certain type of person to look at a zombie and see anything other than a rotting, brain-eating, mindless creature.
Middle Aged Weirdo in a Cadillac, by George R. Galuschak
Fiction.
She's seen it all, and more, on TV; all those middle-aged weirdos, doing terrible things to those poor lost girls.
Rebranding, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
All sound delicious, do they not?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Short History of Fantasy by Farah Mendlesohn and Edward James, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Wednesday: Kick Ass, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: The Returners by Gemma Malley, reviewed by Hallie O'Donovan

4/5/10

Interplanet Mamet: The Future of Live Theater in Space, by Ramon Arjona
Article.
From the actor Pikes in Bradbury's classic story "Usher II" to the actor in John Alfred Taylor's recent story "Bare, Forked Animal," the high tech realm of virtual reality and space travel coexists with the relatively low tech realm of live theater. Movies, TV, and the internet have all had a role in displacing the entertainment technology that has come before them, but none have been able to wholly eradicate the live theater.
Scores, by John Clute
Column.
If the Library of America hoped that Straub would be able to prestidigitate a canon out of the noise of Postwar, they were clearly wrong. They will have to be content with a superb anthology whose contents do not hold up.
The Duke of Vertumn's Fingerling, by Elizabeth Carroll
Fiction.
After I opened my eyes they dressed me in silk. A bone-white gown slipped over my head and I raised my arms for it like a child. With my hair undone, I must have looked like a bride. I was nothing of the kind.
Revisionism, by F.J. Bergmann
Poetry.
Fresh-minted, teneral, a new body- / with new ideas-crept from each / rejected discard. Membranous husks
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: VALIS and Later Novels by Philip K. Dick, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: The Bookman by Lavie Tidhar, reviewed by Michael Froggatt
Friday: Lightbreaker by Mark Teppo, reviewed by Peter Whitfield

3/29/10

Interview: Marge Simon, by JoSelle Vanderhooft
Article.
I'm a happy camper when I'm doing both: writing and art every day, along with a dose of reading and adventures into what else is being done by other artists/writers and poets. Like breathing.
Somadeva: A Sky River Sutra, by Vandana Singh
Fiction.
These old stories have as many meanings as there are stars in the sky. To assign one single interpretation to them is to miss the point.
Idle Thoughts While Watching a Faun, by Sonya Taaffe
Poetry.
His throat like oiled olive, his warm arms smell / not of rut and vinegar, but resin and stillness / disturbed, the hot light filtering on the beeches / and river-veins, the muddied onyx
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N. K. Jemisin, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Wednesday: Terminal World by Alastair Reynolds, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Friday: Shades of Grey by Jasper Fforde, reviewed by Sara Polsky

3/22/10

Imaginative Tales in Real-World Locations, by James Schellenberg
Column.
For me, Robinson is a writer who gives the clearest sense of the places in his books, but there are many other genre writers who can help transport us either to places we know very well or are new to us. I'll try to point to a few broad categories of books that can show us real-world locations in a convincing way.
Merrythoughts, by Bill Kte'pi
Fiction.
They cut Jaima's wings off when she was a baby. She doesn't remember, but she says she does if they ask, says she remembers what the choir sounded like before she was cut off from it, and what the sky looked like when she could still see the eleven secret colors.
A Face Like an Imperfectly Shaven Tennis Ball, by Helena Bell
Poetry.
She can have my hands too. To open jars, diet coke cans, / and to smack her demon-spawn cat into next Tuesday.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: When it Changed: Science into Fiction edited by Geoff Ryman, reviewed by Matt Denault
Wednesday: Experiments at 3 Billion A.M. by Alexander Zelenyj, reviewed by James Trimarco
Friday: The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus, reviewed by David J. Schwartz

3/15/10

Superman as Science Fiction, by Daniel Peretti
Article.
Saying that all Superman stories qualify as science fiction wouldn't be entirely accurate, despite the presence of science fiction motifs and conventions. Many of them are traditional adventure stories, or perhaps more appropriately classified as sci-fi, since many of them choose not to explore themes related to human nature or the "something more" that many writers insist as a component of true science fiction.
Writing From A Strange Land: The Imaginative Displacement of Margaret Mahy, by Karen Healey
Column.
I come from fantasyland. To outsiders, it might be Middle-Earth, or Narnia, and (the Hollywood rumours say) Azeroth; exotic imagined locales. But it gets annoying to be enthusiastically complimented on the beauty of your country by the phrase, "It looks just like the movies!" No. The movie landscapes look like home.
The Kiss, by Elizabeth Herald
Fiction.
The goblin watching me from the bleachers has been watching me all my life. He's short, about five feet two inches, and he dresses impeccably, wearing a full tuxedo most days. His eyes are yellow with no whites, and hungry.
Anasazi, by Richard Schiffman
Poetry.
At night they plaited mythic baskets. / Four worlds ago they tunneled up / ant people pouring from earth's navel. / The world they earned we live in now,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Stone Dance of the Chameleon by Ricardo Pinto, reviewed by David McWilliam
Wednesday: Naamah's Kiss by Jacqueline Carey, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: The Secret History of Science Fiction, edited by James Patrick Kelly and John Kessel, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

3/8/10

An Empire in Words: The Great Library of Alexandria, by Jennifer de Guzman
Article.
But this much is clear: The Great Library of Alexandria was a bid toward immortality, a stay against annihilation. In the ancient world, Alexandria was a remnant of Alexander the Great's empire and a major cultural and trading center. Ships that sailed into the harbor were forced to hand over their scrolls to the library, where scribes made copies. The library gave the copies to the scrolls' owners in place of the originals, which became part of the Great Library's collection. The collection held works of only of drama and poetry and philosophy, but also scientific texts, works of mathematics, astronomy, medicine and mechanics. The library was the known world, past and present, under one roof: the ultimate empire.
Who in Mortal Chains, by Claire Humphrey
Fiction.
They offered violence. It's an offer I can't help but accept.
Sightings, by Marge Simon
Poetry.
A young writer at your door, / you made no excuses for / the empty bottles, the debris / of loneliness and bygone times,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Selected short fiction from 2009, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Wednesday: 2009 short fiction, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Friday: The Stone Dance of the Chameleon by Ricardo Pinto, reviewed by David McWilliam

3/1/10

Fall of a Superhero in Doctor Who: "The Waters of Mars", by Kristin King
Article.
There is an inherent contradiction in superhero fiction. The stronger the villains are, the more powerful the superhero must become. And the worse the situation, the more serious the consequences of the superhero's actions. Unless stopped, the superhero crosses a line and becomes not our protector but our villain.
Small Burdens, by Paul M. Berger
Fiction.
Moth had a new possum. She had fashioned a little broom for the creature and now she was teaching it to sweep the floor. This was proving an uphill battle. The possum had no natural grasp of the concept of tidiness, and it was developing a rapidly escalating personal hatred of Moth.
Cultural Climate, by F.J. Bergmann
Poetry.
On the centers of frozen lakes, / they built crystal palaces of ice / to demonstrate their faith that / climate was immutable.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Red Claw by Philip Palmer, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: The Brain Thief by Alexander Jablokov, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Friday: In Great Waters by Kit Whitfield, reviewed by T. S. Miller

2/22/10

A Stranger in a Strange Land: Ricardo Pinto and the Stone Dance of the Chameleon, by Angeline Adams
Article.
"Although it is within our power to eliminate poverty, for example, I'm not so sure that we have it in us to avoid the most terrible consequences of global warming. I feel that, because there is always hope that a human being can be talked around—talked off a ledge, talked into putting down his gun—too many of us treat our planet as if it was amenable to such persuasion. It isn't: it's not human, and it's implacable."
Scores, by John Clute
Column.
Peter Straub is a very well-known figure, with strong tastes, and the task he has undertaken in this very conspicuous and very sizeable (though not perhaps quite sufficiently vast) enterprise is a delicate one.
Sundowning, by Joanne Merriam
Fiction.
"It's time for the bloodletting," I told him. I had the needle ready in my hand.
What If, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
to sing their own dark songs
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Heroes in the Wind by Robert E. Howard, reviewed by William Mingin
Wednesday: Audrey's Door by Sarah Langan, reviewed by Richard Larson
Friday: The Sad Tale of the Brothers Grossbart by Jesse Bullington, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum

2/15/10

2009: A Year of Giving, Part 4: LiveJournal Auctions, by JoSelle Vanderhooft
Article.
Regardless of the shows they watch or the books they read, fannish LiveJournalers tend to be a close-knit and generous group with a reputation for protecting their own. Not even two years after Strikethrough, the LiveJournal fan community united against a problem that affected far more people than the site's user base: the 2009 U.S. recession. And they did it in a most creative way: By auctioning off everything from DVDs, books, and memorabilia to crafts, fanart, and fanfiction to make rent money, pay hospital bills, and save the homes of fans and pros alike from the rash of foreclosures sweeping the United States.
To Infinity, and Beyond: Exploring the Limits of Computation, by Owen Anderson
Article.
Since computers began to intrude on popular consciousness in the second half of the 20th century, authors have been quick to latch onto their superhuman calculating capacities as a mechanism for narrative advancement, and as a means of justifying near-future speculative fiction. Indeed, the powers of the computer, particularly as a source of alternative and/or augmented reality, have spawned whole subgenres which have risen, fallen, and been reinvented. However, contrary to popular conception, modern computers (and even conceivable future ones) are not without limitations. There are some questions out there that are really too hard to solve, even for a computer.
Revisiting Hitchcock, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Sometime last year, I decided to watch some Alfred Hitchcock movies I hadn't seen in a while, and also to fill in a few gaps in my viewing.
Doctor Diablo Goes Through the Motions, by Saladin Ahmed
Fiction.
"I can guess his goddamn origin: Disaffected rich kid. Fled America and trained with mystical Eastern warriors. Soon became the best—one year at ninja camp is always enough time for a gringo to get better than any native."
Inter-Sentient Personal Ads, by John Nichols
Poetry.
Must have suckers on each feeler.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Avilion by Robert Holdstock, reviewed by David J. Schwartz
Wednesday: Boneshaker by Cherie Priest, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Friday: Chasing the Dragon by Justina Robson, reviewed by Niall Harrison

2/8/10

Nice Makes Write: An Interview with Casey Wolf, by Robert Runté
Article.
Not all of my characters do the right thing. But when they don’t, there are repercussions—not in terms of divine (or authorial) retribution, but in the same terms as life. I don’t see this as being about niceness, or characters putting others ahead of themselves. It’s more about integrity, something some of my characters summon up with ease where others struggle with it. When we live without integrity, we suffer the consequences: greater isolation, with all the lack of resource—emotional and psychological, at least—that that implies; lower self-regard (on whatever level we are honest with ourselves); an extinguishment of a sense of belonging and all-for-oneness that gets human communities through long periods of difficulty and want. In other words, supposedly selfish behaviour actually drags the individual down. We don’t like ourselves as much, and no one else holds us in such high regard, either. And we don’t heal from our wounds, but carry them around sequestered behind our defenses.
After We Got Back the Lights, by Eric Del Carlo
Fiction.
It was always a small town. Not insular, and not poor—not by a long shot—back when money was a measurement. Those who stayed and those who survived turned out to be decent people. Maybe I was surprised at just how decent, or how capable, or how willing to dig in and do what work needed doing.
Little Ghosts, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
This is no joke — / ghosts are real — / as real as economics.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Book of Endings by Deborah Biancotti, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Dragon Keeper by Robin Hobb, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein
Friday: Eclipse Three, edited by Jonathan Strahan, reviewed by T. S. Miller

2/1/10

The Villain with the Heart of Flamboyant Evil, by James Schellenberg
Column.
A look at the non-subtle antagonist in James Cameron's movies
Cory's Father, by Francesca Forrest
Fiction.
Cory was the other one who never got a dad story. "Your dad was just a twinkle in my eye," was all Mom would say. Cory would smile and go running off with Vessy, and Mom's eyes would follow Vessy, but Cory she had to follow with her ears only, because of the deal she made with Cory's dad.
How to Bake a Cake From Scratch, by Lisa Nohealani Morton
Poetry.
Once you've got evolution started, / don't worry about the mess
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Tales from the Mabinogion: The Ninth Wave by Russell Celyn Jones and White Ravens by Owen Sheers, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: The Day of the Triffids, reviewed by C. B. Harvey
Friday: The Beast with Nine Billion Feet by Anil Menon, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp

1/25/10

2009: A Year of Giving, Part 3: Child's Play, by Pamela Manasco
Article.
To be sitting there with your child who can barely move for all the tubes and wires connected to him, who hasn't been able to eat for days and hasn't been home in weeks, who can't remember the last time he didn't feel awful and wonders if he'll ever feel good again, and have him laugh out loud when he crashes his go-kart in a video game... well, there aren't words so I won't try.
The Mad Scientist's Daughter (Part 2 of 2), by Theodora Goss
Fiction.
"There, you see? I'm not saying we should spend all of our time planning to take over the world. I have other commitments myself. But I do think we should start giving it some serious consideration."
On Keeping Pluto a Planet, by Greg Beatty
Poetry.
Uneven, unbalanced, elliptical,/not even the farthest out,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The 2009 David Gemmell Legend Award Shortlist, Part One, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: The 2009 David Gemmell Legend Award Shortlist, Part Two, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Friday: Love Puppets and other webcomics by Jessica McLeod and Edward J. Grug III, reviewed by Michael H. Payne

1/18/10

2009: A Year of Giving, Part 2: Madras Press, by Pamela Manasco
Article.
It's unfortunate when writers view the thoughtless turns of commercial publishing as indicative of an inherent quality to something so basic as page length. Our job, as publishers, is to figure out suitable methods for making great literature available to large groups of people, regardless of what we're used to reading or to seeing on bookshelves.
Scores, by John Clute
Column.
Every telling exposes (or tries to hide) a teller responsible for the tale.
The Mad Scientist's Daughter (Part 1 of 2), by Theodora Goss
Fiction.
We don't judge. Who, indeed, are we to do so? We have all done things of which we are not proud. The club is a haven for us, a port in a particularly stormy world.
Struldbrug Variations, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Then in twice that amount of years/it appears blue,/a sky-colored or oceanic hole/that threatens to drink up time
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood and The Rapture by Liz Jenzen, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: Cast a Deadly Spell, reviewed by Raz Greenberg
Friday: Wild Hunt by Margaret Ronald, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin

1/11/10

2009: A Year of Giving, by S.J. Chambers
Article.
During the height of last year's problems, readers came out of the World Wide woodwork to help support their favorite writers and artists, small publishers and arduous editors produced collections solely for charity, and satirical cartoonists championed toy drives for children's hospitals.
All The Big Kids are Doing It, by Karen Healey
Column.
In the grand and lazy tradition of end-of-year columnists everywhere, here are my personal favourite SFF young adult books of the decade. (Not, I hasten to add, a "best of" list. This is almost bound to reveal more about my reading prejudices than it is the relative quality of books on and off the list.)
The Blue Wonder, by Chris Kammerud
Fiction.
Let's begin at the end, on the night when, flying high above New York, the Blue Wonder's heart failed him for the third and final time.
By Way of Sorrow, by Peg Duthie
Poetry.
I've been told there are cures, but what I've heard/always ends with a witch in the fire
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Other Lands by David Anthony Durham, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Sherlock Holmes, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Friday: Two Views: Doctor Who, "The End of Time", reviewed by Tony Keen and Tim Phipps

1/4/10

Everyone's a Rebel: An Interview with Jeff VanderMeer, by Cynthia Hawkins
Article.
I really and truly believe that if you don't invest enough personal self into a fantasy novel, then why should anyone care? I mean, all fiction is imaginary, but it's more pronounced when you're reading something about an imaginary place. If you don't put something personal in there, if you're not personally invested in it, and of course as a thinking, feeling person in the 21st century who has been absolutely horrified, and your jaw drops sometimes when you see what's happened, the whole way in which America's imperialism of the last decade has played out, it just can't help but effect your work.
Revisiting the Fantastic Classics: Green Chapels, Beheadings, and the Search for Meaning: Travels with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Part 4, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
This week, in the fourth and final fitt, we'll find out how the story ends. After staying a week in Lord Bertilak's castle, it's finally time for Gawain to ride out to the ominous Green Chapel, where, on New Year's Day, he must finally keep the covenant he made with the enigmatic Green Knight last Christmas . . . and where, if Lady Bertilak's magic girdle doesn't turn out to be the protective talisman she claimed, Gawain stands to lose his head to the giant's green-gleaming axe.
Four Lies from the Mouth of God, by Megan Arkenberg
Fiction.
The day the soldiers came, I drank cold coffee out of a cold mug and tried not to think about Jul.
Bubba, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
one could no more / put a patch on a damaged / wing or red jewel of an eye
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 2009 Year In Review, by Our Reviewers
Wednesday: Avatar, reviewed by Roz Kaveney
Friday: The Cardinal's Blades and L'Alchimiste des Ombres by Pierre Pevel, reviewed by Kari Sperring

12/21/09

A Rose Is Rose, by Georgina Bruce
Fiction.
Sashi is painting the soles of the King's feet when the two Indian elephants are led up Cape Hill. She hears the soft calls of the mahouts, speaking the old language that only they and the beasts understand, and she runs to the window of the King's attic flat.
Hunting Party, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
I return by secret paths to the campsite
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Apex Book of World SF, edited by Lavie Tidhar, reviewed by Andy Sawyer
Tuesday: Intelligent Design edited by Denise Little, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Wednesday: Total Oblivion, More or Less by Alan DeNiro, reviewed by Hallie O'Donovan

12/14/09

Three Questions for The Apex Book of World SF Authors, by Nicholas Seeley
Article.
A few weeks ago, Nicholas Seeley took a look at the recently published Apex Book of World SF, to discuss questions of "otherness" in literature, and how speculative fiction plays a role in societies around the world. This week, Seeley asks the authors three simple questions about what the market for speculative fiction is like in their countries, and what role they think local culture, myth, and legend play in literature of the fantastic.
On the Eating of Corpses, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
A friend of mine and his sister came over to visit one night. His sister was in her early twenties and enthusiastic about various political causes. Many things she had become aware of disgusted and horrified her about American society, business, and government. She was a vegetarian and had decided on this lifestyle for moral reasons rather than reasons of health.
Beautiful White Bodies (Part 2 of 2), by Alice Sola Kim
Fiction.
They glided closer, moving to surround Justine. She was nervous. They were so damn tall, and their faces blocked out the world around her in a circle of horrible loveliness, creating an alien ecosystem in which Justine—imperfect, spotted, human—could not breathe.
Finding the God Particle, by Sandra J. Lindow
Poetry.
It is something and nothing
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Makers by Cory Doctorow, reviewed by Anil Menon
Wednesday: Never Slow Dance With a Zombie by E Van Lowe, reviewed by Sara Polsky
Friday: Fire by Kristin Cashore, reviewed by Nic Clarke

12/7/09

Comic-Con 2009: Fandom Meets its Makers, and the Makers Meet New Media, by Mark Newheiser
Article.
In real life he's a marine stationed in Arizona, but when he gets the chance he cosplays to the hilt.
Beautiful White Bodies (Part 1 of 2), by Alice Sola Kim
Fiction.
The fall after Justine moved back home, the high school girls became beautiful. She saw it herself, from behind the counter of the coffee shop by her old high school. The beauty spread viciously: first to one girl, then two, then four, and now almost twenty.
Immaterial, by Sharon M. White
Poetry.
my toes crawled off to eat some grass
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Gardens of the Sun by Paul McAuley, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Wednesday: The Martian General's Daughter by Theodore Judson, reviewed by Mahesh Raj Mohan
Friday: The Road, reviewed by T. S. Miller

11/30/09

The Emancipation of Bat Durston, or: "I'm from Iowa, I Only Work in Outer Space", by Nathan E. Lilly
Article.
Just as science fiction isn't properly defined as having rocket ships, and Westerns aren't properly defined as having cowboys, space Westerns certainly aren't properly defined as cowboys on rockets.
Travel the Solar System (and Earth) with Kim Stanley Robinson, by James Schellenberg
Column.
I think the one thread that follows through all of his books is a sense of place, of visiting somewhere with Robinson as a friendly guide. This is a notion that ties a light fantasy/travelogue like Escape from Kathmandu (set in Nepal) to Robinson's famous Mars trilogy, essentially giving Robinson remarkable freedom to pursue current interests and still give fans the same kind of experience from book to book.
Tyrannia, by Alan DeNiro
Fiction.
If the man knew that an egret was measuring the laceration on his broken leg, he would have been amused, but not forlorn. He always had a fondness for unruly birds when he agitated.
Cities in Fog, by Robert Frazier and Andrew Joron
Poetry.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Hellbound Hearts edited by Paul Kane and Marie O'Reagan, reviewed by David McWilliam
Friday: V, reviewed by Raz Greenberg

11/23/09

Universal Language? Authors from the Apex Book of World SF Discuss the Global Reach of Speculative Fiction, by Nicholas Seeley
Article.
The stories cross genre—some are fantasy, some sci-fi, a few are horror and one seems more a crime thriller than anything else. One element that one could argue unites almost all the tales in this anthology, and indeed, gives it its own particular flavor, is the explicit connection that's drawn between speculative fiction and displacement. These are stories from many cultures and countries, but they are, in the vast majority, stories about people without countries, or between cultures. So is it really important where they were written? Well, yes—both because of the discourse each tale offers on culture, and because each tale is, in a way, a different answer to the question of why we value "world fiction" to begin with.
Becoming New: Young Adult SFF and the Adolescent Body, by Karen Healey
Column.
Hey, remember the process of becoming a young adult, when everything changed?
All the Anne Franks, by Erik Hoel
Fiction.
When the aliens came and cut the sky up into golden ribbons Dan Milestone ran inside to get his daughter Margaret and put her up on his shoulders in the front yard and told her that this was history and she told him to put her down because he was embarrassing her.
ὡς πολλοῖς ὄμμασιν εἰς σὲ βλέπω, by Sonya Taaffe
Poetry.
stark as shadows cast by sun within a cave, / but the gravity of hand answering hand,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Lamentation and Canticle by Ken Scholes, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Wednesday: Transition by Iain (M.) Banks, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Friday: Objects of Worship by Claude Lalumiere, reviewed by Anil Menon

11/16/09

Jesse Bullington and The Brutal Invasion of The Brothers Grossbart, by S.J. Chambers
Article.
I absolutely love monsters. After all that talk of everything else, I neglected to mention I also wanted to write a book with a lot of monsters. Not just human monsters. I wanted to deal with the question of what is more horrific: a person who is capable of anything, or something that is literally monstrous and out of the bowels of our collective imagination? Rather than just sticking to medieval bestiaries, I tried to incorporate the parallel between different mythologies of similar creatures.
A Brief Investigation of the Process of Decay, by Genevieve Valentine
Fiction.
There was a pause before "interested" that meant "acclimated," as if Mars was going to be just like the rez, except without oxygen.
Deluge, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
When he learned he could drink the stars, he vowed / that even one burning sphere could never be enough
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Filaria by Brent Hayward, reviewed by Matt Denault
Wednesday: The Year's Best Science Fiction and Fantasy, volume 3, edited by Jonathan Strahan, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Friday: Two Views: Moxyland by Lauren Beukes, reviewed by James Trimarco and Paul Raven

11/9/09

A History of the Death Ray, by Benjamin Wakefield
Article.
Phasers, lasers, masers, disruptors, blasters, pulse rifles, plasma cannons and concussion beams—call it what you will, the directed energy weapon has become a staple element of the science fiction and fantasy genre.
True Names, by Stephanie Burgis
Fiction.
When I let Sam sweet talk me into moving out here to the back of beyond to be his wife, it was all about the romance of the wild, the two of us standing at each other's sides against mountain lions and poisonous snakes, and me learning to be just as fierce against them as any man. Days like today somehow never got mentioned in any of his stories, back then.
f(love) = 0, by Monica M. Eiland
Poetry.
how could I have missed Newton's trick / to finding area where none used to exist?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Magicians by Lev Grossman, reviewed by John Clute
Wednesday: Interfictions 2, edited by Delia Sherman and Christopher Barzak, reviewed by T. S. Miller
Friday: Green by Jay Lake, reviewed by Kyra Smith

11/2/09

A Memory of Robert Jordan, by Stefan J�zefowicz
Article.
Robert Jordan has been recognized as one of the most famous fantasy writers of his time. He passed away on September 16, 2007, before he was able to finish his magnum opus. Nevertheless, the Wheel of Time still turns. October 27, 2009 marked the publication of The Gathering Storm, the first of three posthumous novels planned to conclude the series.
Nomadology, by Chris Nakashima-Brown
Fiction.
On-screen, stop-motion set pieces illustrated a science fiction fantasy of the destruction of the state apparatus and the abolition of private property mediated by alien invasion and natural disaster. The only sound in the room was the soft clicking of aluminum knitting needles, like a DIY Geiger counter monitoring our entropic half-lives.
Off the Pi Charts, by P M F Johnson
Poetry.
The gates of Faerie are eroding—
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Ark by Stephen Baxter, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont and Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Wednesday: The Drowning City by Amanda Downum, reviewed by Kari Sperring
Friday: Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater, reviewed by Hallie O'Donovan

10/26/09

Ms. Liberty Gets a Haircut, by Cat Rambo
Fiction.
"If you're going to be our leader, you need to look like you haven't time-travelled here from the 20th century," Dr. Arcane grumbles to Ms. Liberty. "You may have been built with the blueprints from the Stepford wives, but you don't have to keep looking like one."
Surreal People, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
The evolution of flora and fawning / would have learned nothing / from Darwin.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Black Mirror and Other Stories, edited by Franz Rottensteiner (trans. Mike Mitchell), reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: 1942 by Robert Conroy, reviewed by Douglas W. Texter
Friday: Orbus by Neal Asher, reviewed by Dan Hartland

10/19/09

Crying Wolf on Mars, by Brian Trent
Article.
Methane represents the best clue yet, and coupled with the mystery of the Dark Dune Spots, we have all the justifications needed to conduct a serious investigation. NASA is presently narrowing a list of landing-sites for its upcoming Mars Science Laboratory project. That list includes ancient riverbeds, dead seas, craters containing flood deposits, and clay-rich mountains. Should an upcoming mission prove life is there, then the Martian meteorites would likely move out of limbo. And in a strange irony, this would also confirm the notion that Martians brought life to Earth�in a way.
The Regime of Austerity, by Veronica Schanoes
Fiction.
Under the Regime of Austerity, Stella can no longer afford much color. What she gets she uses on her hair and her eyes, even though all the magazines say that's a waste. Hair falls out and eyes tear up, and eventually the color wears away and she's left with nothing until her next ration coupon.
Gepetto, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
By evening, he is nearly finished; / all that remains doing
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: House of Windows by John Langan and Slights by Kaaron Warren, reviewed by Richard Larson
Wednesday: Rampant by Diana Peterfreund, reviewed by Sara Polsky
Friday: Fifty Key Figures in Science Fiction, edited by Mark Bould, Andrew M. Butler, Adam Roberts and Sherryl Vint, reviewed by Martin Lewis

10/12/09

Desert Island Movies, by James Schellenberg
Column.
The world of science fiction cinema is a rich and varied one. Fantasy . . . . not so much.
The Second Conquest of Earth, by L. J. Daly
Fiction.
The Kus left us our religions, to keep us docile. My mother's brand of snake-oil soothsaying passed the test, thanks to years on the best-seller lists. That this Kus hasn't killed me tells me he thinks I can read his future.
Thirteen Scifaiku for Blackbirds, by Joanne Merriam
Poetry.
It was autumn all year. / Blackbirds came and went.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Stranger by Max Frei, reviewed by William Mingin
Wednesday: Tile by Maryanne Rose Papke, reviewed by Michael H. Payne
Friday: Red Planets: Marxism and Science Fiction, edited by Mark Bould and China Mieville, reviewed by Michael Froggatt

10/5/09

Revisiting the Fantastic Classics: Of Boar Hunts, Seductions, and Medieval Underwear: Travels with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Part 3, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
This is the third of four columns on magic in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," everybody's favorite raunchy, sexy, blood-soaked Middle English poem. The previous two columns discussed monsters, pentacles, and what it takes to shake up a Knight of the Round Table. This one gets into castles, hunting, chivalry, gender relations, and seduction—medieval style!
And Their Lips Rang with the Sun, by Amal El-Mohtar
Fiction.
Look at them! Are they not beautiful? Had cinnamon been ground and rubbed into their skin, they could not have been more brown, more fragrant, more beloved of the wine-bright sky.
The Sorrows of Rutherford, the Amazing Talking Dog, by Daniel Wright
Poetry.
We bow, you walk me off into the wings / and treat my question as rhetorical.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Grazing the Long Acre by Gwyneth Jones, reviewed by Andy Sawyer
Wednesday: Voyage to Arcturus by David Lindsay, reviewed by Joel Zartman
Friday: Blood of the Mantis by Adrian Tchaikovsky, reviewed by Peter Whitfield

9/28/09

Redneck on the East, Redskin on the West: An Interview with Caleb Fox, by Neal Szpatura
Article.
It is precisely by making the effort to walk in someone else's shoes, to enter someone else's mind and look out through her eyes, that human beings begin to truly understand each other. I believe that goodwill for all sentient beings is the right path for us all, and goodwill comes from understanding.
A Story About Plot, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Grisham posed his idea of plot-driven fiction as a distinction from "literature", but he might be surprised to learn that his idea has precedents among the highest of brows: in what is generally considered the first work of literary criticism, The Poetics, Aristotle argued that plot (mythos) is superior to every other element of tragedy, which he considered the highest form of literary art. To Aristotle, action is most important, and the writer's arrangement of incidents leads to the most vital effects of tragedy.
A Safe Place To Be, by Carol Emshwiller
Fiction.
It started with a funny feeling in the bottoms of my feet. Something is going to happen. Perhaps an earthquake. That's what it feels like. But perhaps terrorists on the way. Whatever it is, something's coming.
To Theia, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
That we are shattered creatures, / our sacred texts assure us, but not why
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Zadayi Red by Caleb Fox, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Wednesday: The Resistance, by Muse by Muse, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Friday: Darkborn by Alison Sinclair, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin

9/21/09

Serving Your Fellow Man: An Interview with Peadar O'Guilin, by Angela Handley
Article.
What I was really interested in were the necessities of survival and the hypocrisy of people who can sneer when they themselves live in more comfortable surroundings. As Robert Louis Stevenson once said: "Nothing more strongly arouses our disgust than cannibalism, yet we make the same impression on Buddhists and vegetarians, for we feed on babies, though not our own."
And This Also Has Been One of the Dark Places of the Earth, by Anna Feruglio Dal Dan
Fiction.
It is probably the sodium glow of the streetlamps I remember—who would have thought I would ever miss it.
Proof of Existence, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
The dreambike had eyes on its spokes
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Dollhouse, season one, reviewed by Bernadette Lynn Bosky and Gianduja Kiss
Wednesday: The Girl with Glass Feet by Ali Shaw, reviewed by Keri Sperring
Friday: The Fire in the Stone by Nicholas Ruddick, reviewed by Dan Hartland

9/14/09

Where the Popular Kids are Sitting, by Karen Healey
Column.
"Is there a link," someone asked, "between science fiction and young adult works?" "Science fiction's what they used to call the YA section before there was a YA section," Westerfeld said, and effortlessly articulated the feeling I'd had for years.
The Yeast of Eire (Part 2 of 2), by Alaya Dawn Johnson
Fiction.
Each time he returned, he would bring me news of Amery's safety and some food. He seemed to know precisely what we most needed—cinnamon bark, preserved lemons, bulbs of dried garlic. I tried not to miss him. I tried not to think about Amery.
The Multiple Universe Poems, by Brenda Cooper
Poetry.
About the puppy we didn't choose
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The New Uncanny edited by Sarah Eyre and Ra Page, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: District 9, reviewed by David J. Schwartz
Friday: The Lord of the Sands of Time by Issui Ogawa and All You Need is KILL by Hiroshi Sakurazaka, reviewed by Martin Lewis

9/7/09

A Dragon in the Time Machine: The Gross Anatomy of Horror, by Nicholas Seeley
Article.
And I do believe there is a narrative that underlies these tales—a story or cycle, rooted in biology or psychology that explains horror stories the way Joseph Campbell's monomyth explains religion and mythology.
The Yeast of Eire (Part 1 of 2), by Alaya Dawn Johnson
Fiction.
I recalled the taste of quinoa plucked fresh from the Eiran fields, its hidden coils unfurled, boiled and dressed with just a bit of lemon and cut radishes. Tart and sharp and rich like the smell of sun on a field after a rain. And I recalled, too, the face of the gilt-haired man with whom I'd shared that dish, the smell of him, and all I'd left behind in the Eiran earth.
Black Hole Hunter's Guide, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
You should think of this book as analogous/to a mushroom hunter's guide
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Mammoth Book of Mindblowing SF edited by Mike Ashley, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Wednesday: The Gift of Joy by Ian Whates, reviewed by Anil Menon
Friday: One by Conrad Williams, reviewed by David McWilliam

8/31/09

Everything Dies, Baby, by Nadia Bulkin
Fiction.
When Beth handed him the phone he nearly dropped it, and after he dragged himself to the kitchen for privacy he could not seem to make his fingers work with the buttons. He kept muttering. He kept starting over.
Little Red Cap Grows Up, by Amy Cummins
Poetry.
Angina, chronic back pain, rotten molars
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Amberlight and Riversend by Sylvia Kelso, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Consorts of Heaven by Jaine Fenn, reviewed by Peter Whitfield
Friday: Wireless by Charles Stross, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy

8/24/09

Sagas, Screenplays, and Reasons to Read the News: An Interview with Terry Brooks, by Mark Newheiser
Article.
[Y]ou have to be open to the fact that your ideas today are not necessarily going to be your ideas tomorrow. And what seems like it's going to work today may not necessarily be what works tomorrow. You cannot get too dogmatic.
Desert Island Top 12, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Not long ago, a friend forwarded a rather nostalgia-inducing link to me: the Top 100 Sci-Fi Books list. . . . In the spirit of controversy-baiting list-makers everywhere, I present a list of books that I point to as examples of how to do something right.
Charms, by Shweta Narayan
Fiction.
It's too easy, the tide of war washing these feckless, smiling girls up, drowning Edith in the bile and brine of the past. And she's hardly old, not yet. Not yet. She shakes her head tiredly. Women's magic, she says, is like everything else. Not good enough for girls these days.
They pass a dwarf star around like a bottle of rum, by Sankar Roy
Poetry.
Copper shackles dazzle from their unzipped nebulas.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The New Space Opera 2, eds. Jonathan Strahan and Gardner Dozois, and Open Your Eyes by Paul Jessup, reviewed by Richard Larson
Wednesday: Tides From the New Worlds by Tobias S. Buckell, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Friday: Nekropolis by Tim Waggoner, reviewed by Kyra Smith

8/17/09

Origin, by Ari Goelman
Fiction.
"I should never date other supers," I say, not for the first time. I put my hand on my stomach. Crap. I can barely keep a spider plant alive. There's no way I'm ready to be a mother.
MINSTREL'S LAST SONG, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
To the sea, to the sea / eurydice, eurydice...
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Ask and The Answer by Patrick Ness, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: Jasmyn by Alex Bell, reviewed by Angela Slatter
Friday: Zoo by Otsuichi, reviewed by Karen Burnham

8/10/09

Wordcraft and War Fiction: An Interview with David Weber, by Kenneth Mark Hoover
Article.
I think of what I do as my craft, not as my "art." . . . The story I'm telling takes me where it has to go, and I go there willingly, doing the best work I can along the way.
Finisterre, by Maria Deira
Fiction.
Prima, she said to me, if you see a man with dilated pupils, a man who smells like mildew, a man with fingernails that are stained yellow and teeth that are uneven and broken, prima, if you see that man—run. Run! Because that man is a pinche werewolf.
Summer and Austin Have Left Their Apartment For a House, by Romie Stott
Poetry.
They don't use the term latent heat anymore.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Hungry Ghosts by Anne Berry and White is for Witching by Helen Oyeyemi, reviewed Dan Hartland
Wednesday: The Best of Michael Moorcock, edited by John Davey with Ann and Jeff VanderMeer, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Friday: Best Served Cold by Joe Abercrombie, reviewed by Niall Harrison

8/3/09

Salt's Father, by Eric Gregory
Fiction.
For a moment there was only silence. The old man wondered if the servitor had died of hunger. Then it crawled out of shadow, its head swiveling left and right with a high, hurtful screech of metal on metal. Sensors and little pincers dangled out of its too-wide-open mouth.
The Chymical Marriage, by Sonya Taaffe
Poetry.
They belong dead, but we resurrect them
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: On Joanna Russ, edited by Farah Mendlesohn, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: Torchwood: Children of Earth, reviewed by Roz Kaveney
Friday: The Laurentine Spy by Emily Gee, reviewed by Rosalind Casey

7/27/09

Saint Patrick, the Irish Druids, and the Conversion of Pagan Ireland to Christianity, by Bridgette Da Silva
Article.
The stories of the mythical saint can certainly tell us much about the context of the times in which they were invented, the seventh century AD, but what can they tell us about the truth behind the conversion of the Irish to Christianity?
Bespoke, by Genevieve Valentine
Fiction.
The floors were real dateverified oak, the velvet curtains shipped from Paris in a Chinese junk during the six weeks in '58 when one of the Vagabonder boys slept with a Wright brother and planes hadn't been invented.
Rattlebox III, by Mike Allen, Kendall Evans, & David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
Skinner's daughter is or is not / within the box, a paradox. / Is she learning an algebraic maze?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Impossible Stories II by Zoran �ivković, reviewed by Anil Menon
Wednesday: Moon, reviewed by David J. Schwartz
Friday: Blood of Ambrose by James Enge, reviewed by William Mingin

7/20/09

Marvelous Toys: Cell Phones, Twitter, and Relationship-by-Text, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
The big news this week is that I'm getting a new phone. I'm excited, of course, because really I think about this first as a fancy new toy, one that will allow me to play games on the go—not just Tetris, but the more nebulous social "games" for which sites like Facebook and Twitter have opened the door. I am going to be texting like a Japanese 13-year-old with a two-hour round-trip commute, people.
The Ghost of Onions, by Marcie Lynn Tentchoff
Fiction.
It's cold outside, but her kitchen is warm and bright, and in its comfortable familiarity she can almost banish away the chill of melancholy, the knowledge deep inside her that there should be, there must be, something more to life.
Book of the Dead Woman, by Mary Alexandra Agner
Poetry.
I'd eat your inconsistencies / and read the songs of my entrails.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Traitor to the Crown by C. C. Finlay, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Spiral Hunt by Margaret Ronald, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: Spook City: stories by Peter Atkins, Clive Barker and Ramsey Campbell, edited by Angus Mackenzie, reviewed by Andy Sawyer

7/13/09

Was There Ever a Dinosaur Civilization?, by Brian Trent
Article.
It must be accepted that our fossil collection represents a sliver of a fraction of the species that existed. It's like a great lottery game, whose ultimate prize is immortality on a museum shelf.
Let Us Now Praise Awesome Dinosaurs, by Leonard Richardson
Fiction.
"Humans won't pay to watch dinosaurs ride motocross bikes forever," said Tark. "I'm gonna branch out. Target shooting. I'll be like those tough guys in the action movies."
Revolution Day, by Marcus Goodyear
Poetry.
Start the flight that ends with smash. / We'll all super-collide to find immensity,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Long Price Quartet by Daniel Abraham, reviewed by Gwyneth Jones
Wednesday: The Routledge Companion to Science Fiction, edited by Mark Bould, Andrew M. Butler, Adam Roberts and Sherryl Vint, reviewed by Nick Hubble
Friday: The Painting and the City by Robert Freeman Wexler, reviewed by Matt Denault

7/6/09

A Statistical Study of Locus Online's "Notable Books", by Valentin D. Ivanov
Article.
What is going on with the demography of the subgenres? Do we get more and more sequels every year, recycling the same old ideas?
On the Destruction of Copenhagen by the War-Machines of the Merfolk, by Peter M. Ball
Fiction.
The television stutters as we flick through the channels, colours bleeding together and rendering the devastation a fuzzy blue or green.
Dark Emblem, by Greg Beatty
Poetry.
From our fingers, what falls, / when we new faithful fall?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Legend of Sigurd and Gudr�n by J. R. R. Tolkien, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: The Very Best of Gene Wolfe, by David McWilliam
Friday: Two Tastes of Paprika: Yasutaka Tsutsui's novel (trans. Andrew Driver), and Satoshi Kon's anime, reviewed by Martin Lewis

6/29/09

When Lost Went SF, by James Schellenberg
Column.
The show stumbled, found its way, then went way hardcore on the science fiction. A wrap-up for season 5 and some speculation for the upcoming (and final) season.
River of Heaven, by Rachel Manija Brown
Fiction.
Fulfilling our mission would undoubtedly be the most important thing to happen on Earth that day, but Seiji seemed more interested in window-shopping.
In the Burned Places, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
we wait in vain for the asteroid / its aeon come round at last.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Beyond Balram: Stories by Vandana Singh and Ian McDonald, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Legend of the Seeker, Season One, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: God of Clocks by Alan Campbell, reviewed by Martin Lewis

6/22/09

The Adventures of Little Martin in Tomorrowland, by Matthew Davis
Article.
[I]n the mid-1970s, one of contemporary English literature's soon-to-be foremost personalities spent his apprenticeship as the SF reviewer at one of Britain's most respected Sunday broadsheets.
Another End of the Empire, by Tim Pratt
Fiction.
He sighed. "So I'm expected to send my Fell Rangers to the mountains, raze the village, leave no stone upon a stone, enslave the women, and kill all the younglings to stop this dire prophecy from coming to pass."
Spacekill, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Radioactive natterjacks, leap-frogging / from black hole to black hole;
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Buyout by Alexander Irvine, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Wednesday: The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan, reviewed by Hallie O'Donovan
Friday: Ages of Wonder, edited by Julie E. Czerneda and Rob St. Martin, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy

6/15/09

Captain Newbie!: A 3-D Pete Cartoon, by Mike Fisher
Article.
Hmm . . . I wonder what the first mission with Captain "No Starfleet Experience Whatsoever" Kirk would be like?
Bookshelf Worlds, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
I am a bookshelf voyeur; any time I go into a room with books, I spy and pry. A new room—whether a waiting room, an office, a basement used for storage—always contains excitement for me if it has books, because, until I have thoroughly pored over them, there is the potential for surprise, and the potential is often as electrifying as the reality.
Second-Hand Information, by Jennifer Linnaea
Fiction.
The next day I go to Pisha's house as usual, but his parent meets me at the door and looks at me extra long with her small, pink eyes. "I tell you first-hand that Pisha can't play today," she says. "He's gone in."
Paper Doll, by Elizabeth Lee
Poetry.
all our lives will resemble what we see in magazines
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Up, reviewed by David J. Schwartz
Wednesday: Genesis by Bernard Beckett, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Friday: Fast Ships, Black Sails, edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer, reviewed by Richard Larson

6/8/09

A Journal of Certain Events of Scientific Interest from the First Survey Voyage of the Southern Waters by HMS Ocelot, As Observed by Professor Thaddeus Boswell, DPhil, MSc; or, A Lullaby (Part 2 of 2), by Helen Keeble
Fiction.
Listen. Listen. These are the stories of your lives I am telling you, the real stories, the way that things should be. This is not real, this stinking prison where you cannot live, this cannot be real, I am not watching you be born here, no—
Sweet Tooth, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
when he / heard the dentist's strict injunction / against sweets
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: This Is Not a Game by Walter Jon Williams, reviewed by Paul Raven
Wednesday: Steal Across the Sky by Nancy Kress, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Friday: Retribution Falls by Chris Wooding, reviewed by Michael Levy

6/1/09

Superheroes Used Symbolically in Novels, by Karen Burnham
Article.
Superheroes, being so over-the-top and recognizable, lend themselves brilliantly to satire, and satire is easy to turn towards any number of political targets.
A Journal of Certain Events of Scientific Interest from the First Survey Voyage of the Southern Waters by HMS Ocelot, As Observed by Professor Thaddeus Boswell, D.Phil, MSc.; or, A Lullaby (Part 1 of 2), by Helen Keeble
Fiction.
By Divine providence, we captured the mermaid with neither loss of life nor injury to any seaman, nor any harm done to the specimen.
Spacers' Prison, by Marge Simon
Poetry.
We are his reminders, / a company of ghosts,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Hoshruba, Book One: The Land and the Tilism, by Muhammad Husain Jah, translated by Musharraf Ali Farooqi, reviewed by Anil Menon
Wednesday: Blood and Ice by Robert Masello, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Friday: Nights of Villjamur by Mark Charan Newton, reviewed by Martin Lewis

5/25/09

"That Place of Dark": A Jaunt Through Speculative Fiction, by Daniel Peretti
Article.
The word "jaunt," as it is used today, has a fairly positive connotation. Yet jaunting—or teleportation, movement between two places without traveling through the intervening space—is not so clearly beneficial in speculative fiction.
If Wishes Were Horses, by Tiffani Angus-Bodie
Fiction.
Mam always warned me against trying to hide if the dark riders came.
Wind People, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
There is no tying down the wind with rope or chain or tackle.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Irons in the Fire by Juliet E. McKenna, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Regenesis by C. J. Cherryh, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Friday: Knife by R.J. Anderson, reviewed by Hallie O'Donovan

5/18/09

The Best of 2008, by Iain Jackson
Column.
2008 proved to be an interesting year. Fewer zombies, thank the deity of your choosing—or at least, I read fewer of them, so they didn't make it onto this list.
Baby in the Basket, by Cecil Castellucci
Fiction.
When she knew he had arrived again, she could feel her heart beat faster. She couldn't help it. She loved that little boy. She had become attached. Danielle grabbed the mail and ran up the stairs. Five flights. Breathless. She didn't stop running until she was sure he was really back.
She's in the ice, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
Seemed like a good place / for the stolen mind
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles, Season Two, reviewed by David Hines
Wednesday: Star Trek, reviewed by Iain Clark
Friday: A Madness of Angels by Kate Griffin, reviewed by Laura Blackwell

5/11/09

Let's Stop Conning Ourselves, by Patience Wieland
Article.
Are failures like JumpCon and FedConUSA a testament to science fiction fandom's limitations?
Beyond Bows and Eyelashes: Avatar Alternatives to Gender Rigidity, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
Ridiculous as it may seem, while I have had a copy of Mario Kart since I got my Wii this past October, it's really only in the last couple of months that I've become aware of just how much unlockable content the game contains.
The Rising Waters (Part 2 of 2), by Benjamin Crowell
Fiction.
"Was that the police?" asked Debbie about the invisible ghosts I'd been shouting at. "I don't like police. They hurt Alan Turing, and I can tell you're scared of them. I wish I could see them."
Conflict Carbon, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
unutterably blue / as that sad legend's skies, the shattered hue / of starlight failing
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Battlestar Galactica: "Daybreak", reviewed by Roz Kaveney and Karen Meisner
Wednesday: A Thread of Truth by Nina Allan, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: True Blood, season one, reviewed by Adam Roberts

5/4/09

The "You" Continuum: Narration and Narrative Agents in Video Games, by Mark Newheiser
Article.
[G]ames have a continuum between strongly defined characters tied strictly to a story conceived by the designers, and more free-form characters whom the players are free to create and fill in. The problem with video games is that a designer can't anticipate everything a player might possibly want to do[.]
When Lost Got Lost, by James Schellenberg
Column.
I never watched Lost in its first four seasons. In fact, since September 2004, when the popular show debuted, I did my best to avoid reading about it, since the show seemed to be one of those based around a "mystery" of some kind. I knew that it was about a plane crash on a remote island, but that was about it. I didn't have much motivation to watch it myself, but if I ever did watch it, I wanted the full experience.
The Rising Waters (Part 1 of 2), by Benjamin Crowell
Fiction.
The official working hypothesis was that he was nonresponsive (don't say autistic) due to a mismatch (don't call it boredom) between processing power and input bandwidth.
Infinite Zero, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
Entering the computer
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: UFO in Her Eyes by Xiaolu Guo, reviewed by Richard Larson and Karen Burnham
Wednesday: Living with Ghosts by Kari Sperring, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: The Accord by Keith Brooke, reviewed by Duncan Lawie

4/27/09

Imagining the Perfect Man: Science Fiction and The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, by Chris Kammerud
Article.
Franklin's Autobiography isn't characterized by such obvious strangeness as Gulliver's Travels, yet it also presents readers with an imaginative and alternative way of viewing both Franklin's and their own world.
Blasted Horrors, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
For a few years, I did not want to admit an attraction to horror stories. It's an odd thing to have done, since if any type of stories has consistently attracted me as a reader, they are horror stories, but nonetheless, when I started coming to terms with the fact that yes, my life as a reader had been and was going to continue to be the life of someone profoundly affected by and attracted to genre fiction, I didn't want to admit that the effect and the attraction included horror fiction.
Lily Glass, by Veronica Schanoes
Fiction.
The girl is gone from the castle and her stepmother wanders the corridors. Here is another way of saying the same thing: the girl wanders the corridors, but her stepdaughter is nowhere to be found.
Whiskers, by Jamieson Ridenhour
Poetry.
I was bearded with words.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The 2009 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist, reviewed by Edward James
Wednesday: Patient Zero by Jonathan Maberry, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Friday: Far North by Marcel Theroux, reviewed by Dan Hartland

4/20/09

Revisiting the Canon with Susannah! Wolves, Winter, and the Wild Men of the Woods: Travels with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Part 2, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
Gawain made a pledge to the knight, formally, in the presence of everyone in Arthur's hall: in exchange for striking the Knight with his ax, he accepted the Knight's terms, which were to come find the Knight in one year's time and bare his own neck to the ax. Whether Gawain thought he would ever actually have to fulfill his half of the bargain is irrelevant; since the Knight, improbably, survived their first encounter, Gawain is now honor-bound to perform what he has promised to do.
As He Was, by Kit St. Germain
Fiction.
My Malcolm dollie, I kept in the best condition. I would kiss it and hug it. Sometimes I would put it in a bean can and I would tell it, "You are in invisible armor, my only love. Nothing gonna touch you." I know how crazy that sounds—but where are 'Phonse and Woody Pike and Jerry Rasmussen that signed up with Malcolm? Malcolm came home because of me.
Four Years Later, by Chris Szego
Poetry.
When I watch over the cradle, our daughter, so perfect, / I see the subtle traps ahead:
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Palimpsest by Catherynne M. Valente, reviewed by Matt Denault
Wednesday: Fathom by Cherie Priest, reviewed by Sara Polsky
Friday: Eclipse Two: New Science Fiction and Fantasy, edited by Jonathan Strahan, reviewed by James A. Trimarco

4/13/09

The Revelatory Power of Story: An Interview with Jeffrey Overstreet, by John Ottinger III
Article.
I suppose that the story has led me to think about the revelatory power of art—how beauty "speaks" to us in mysterious ways. But it has also caused me to think about the "monsters" in the real world[.]
Stargazing Through the Ages: The Telescope Turns 400, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
Some four hundred years ago, the news spread through Europe like wildfire: a strange device had been invented which made distant objects appear miraculously close. Sailors, scholars, soldiers and noblemen all eagerly sought out this high-tech wonder. The gossip reached a middle-aged math professor at the University of Padua, who immediately began trying to reverse-engineer the gadget.
The Man Who Lost the Sea, by Theodore Sturgeon
Fiction.
The sick man is buried in the cold sand with only his head and his left arm showing. He is dressed in a pressure suit and looks like a man from Mars. He can hear the pounding of surf and the soft swift pulse of his pumps.
A Spartan Boy, by Ellie Biswell
Poetry.
My grandfather fought at Thermopylae. / I say don't expect a second Lycurgus.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Mr. Gaunt and Other Uneasy Encounters by John Langan, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Subterfuge, edited by Ian Whates, reviewed by Tanya Brown
Friday: Dragonfly Falling by Adrian Tchaikovsky, reviewed by Peter Whitfield

4/6/09

Éowyn under Siege: Female Warriors During the Middle Ages, by Stefan Ingstrand
Article.
Going to war was the most masculine activity imaginable, and men who failed in battle were thought effeminate, so women who entered the fray broke the predominant pattern in a grand way.
Bouncing High into the Stupidsphere (Part Two), by Iain Jackson
Column.
Last time, I covered some recent entries in network television and comics that managed to get just about everything important wrong. Shows and stories that managed to elevate the stupid to a plot point that the show couldn't live without; eliminate the people acting brainlessly, and the story either collapses or comes to a dead end, because actually behaving reasonably undercuts the narrative engine. This time, I cover one last show that's gotten just about everything wrong this season [. . .]
Husbandry, by Eugene Fischer
Fiction.
Next is a family with a nine-year-old boy and a dead parakeet. They aren't just dropping off the carcass for deactivation and disposal, they've come to have Gerry, a professional, explain death to their son. Gerry talks to their son about what happens to the bodies of animals when they die, and points out to him the things that make it clear that his bird is dead: the uncoordinated motion, the abandonment of normal behaviors, the lack of interest in water.
Birdbrain, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Some traits are too deep to excavate / or remold, / like the impulse to take wing, to jump / into the sky
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Powers: Secret Histories, compiled and edited by John Berlyne, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Wednesday: Marcher by Chris Beckett, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Friday: The Sound of Building Coffins by Louis Maistros, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

3/30/09

SF's Founding Father Turns 200, by S. J. Chambers
Article.
Nothing better illustrates Poe's speculative versatility than how widespread and diverse his influence was. To each writer, Poe stood for different ideas[.]
The Thrifty Gamer, or Guildmates are More Valuable than Gold, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
I've recently gotten back into City of Heroes with a vengeance, after about a 6-month hiatus caused mainly by the novelty of my Wii. They had another Double Experience Weekend a couple of weeks ago, and it served its intended purpose quite well, motivating me to jump back in and ultimately quashing some vague ruminations I'd been having on the possibility of canceling my account.
Turning the Apples, by Tina Connolly
Fiction.
"This ain't a negotiation, boyo," says Jonny. "They're fresh and Hawk's in a lather, he needs what you do." Then Jonny is gone and Szo is sick to his knees because he's just remembered that fresh means awake and screaming.
The last time, we trust, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
The last time, / we went with something exoskeletal, / something with fewer organ systems / something colonial.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Seven Beauties of Science Fiction by Istvan Csicser-Ronay Jr., reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: The Good Homor Man by Andrew Fox, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Friday: In Great Waters by Kit Whitfield, reviewed by Kari Sperring

3/23/09

Phil and Jack, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
The Spider in You, by Sean E. Markey
Fiction.
We kept our god under the sink, in an old aquarium, so it wouldn't spill its web all over the house.
Theodote, by Michael Meyerhofer
Poetry.
all across our American highways, / the slick tableaux of truck stops / speak to the same want
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Flora's Dare: How a Girl of Spirit Gambles All to Expand Her Vocabulary, Confront a Bouncing Boy Terror, and Try to Save Califa from a Shaky Doom (Despite Being Confined to Her Room) by Ysabeau S Wilce
Wednesday: Zoe's Tale by John Scalzi
Friday: Gullstruck Island by Frances Hardinge

3/16/09

Art and the Artist: An Interview With Clive Barker, by Lucy A. Snyder
Article.
I'm fed up with the world being divided up into the good guys and the bad guys. It just doesn't work for me. It's not a question of black hats and white hats; that's the movies.
Eras of Le Guin, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Nira and I, by Shweta Narayan
Fiction.
Nira and I are six when her eldest brother loses his way in the mist. Three days later his bones get home. An extra finger sprouts from the left hand, and the skull has no eye sockets. But his clothes dangle from the shoulder blades, and dry knuckles scratch at the door for two days before the King's men come.
Gills, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Haeckel would be pleased—although / in his scheme there never was any such / things as mermaids.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Mind Over Ship by David Marusek, reviewed by Paul Raven
Wednesday: Rosa and the Veil of Gold by Kim Wilkins, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: The Judging Eye by R. Scott Bakker, reviewed by Peter Whitfield

3/9/09

Playing Fair: A Look at Competition in Gaming, by Mark Newheiser
Article.
A game is broken or unbalanced if it becomes clear that spamming a particular move, taking over a particular location, or employing a particular tactic makes everything else in the game irrelevant.
Diana Comet (Part 2 of 2), by Sandra McDonald
Fiction.
Diana had held jewels and diamond crowns; she wasn't impressed by an oval of copper and scrap inscribed with a seal and three-digit number. Things men held dear never ceased to amaze her. Dutifully she said, "It's quite lovely."
The Killer's Suicide Note, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
as if darkness, / growing thicker every moment, / were filling him.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Yellow Blue Tibia by Adam Roberts, reviewed by Michael Froggatt and Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: The Manual of Detection by Jedediah Berry, reviewed by Karen Meisner
Friday: The Adamantine Palace by Stephen Deas, reviewed by Nic Clarke

3/2/09

Diana Comet (Part 1 of 2), by Sandra McDonald
Fiction.
Miss Harvegstraem tilted her head. "Let me guess. A handsome visitor, both well spoken and highly educated. Scion of some wealthy family. He came to you in the cover of darkness, promising sweetness and fidelity, stealing your hard-protected virtue."
The Would-Be Gods of Sonofusion, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
Embrace the stubborn dream / of perpetual energy.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Company by KJ Parker, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: The State of the Art by Iain M. Banks, adapted by Paul Cornell for Radio 4, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Friday: Journey into Space by Toby Litt, reviewed by Martin Lewis

2/23/09

Revisiting the Victorian Techno-thriller, by Nader Elhefnawy
Article.
[W]hat these [1980s techno-thriller] novels really represented was a resurgence of a genre long thought dead, namely the "future war" story as it was known prior to the outbreak of World War I.
Sometimes We Arrive Home, by K. Bird Lincoln
Fiction.
This alien air feels familiar, like something from her own pores.
I Christen Thee, My Higgs Boson, by Michael Meyerhofer
Poetry.
starlings migrating over Wal-Mart / calligraphy of the inexplicable
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Gears of War: Aspho Fields by Karen Traviss, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Wednesday: Poe, edited by Ellen Datlow, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Friday: Dragon in Chains by Daniel Fox, reviewed by Kari Sperring

2/16/09

Creating Dark Matter: An Interview with Sheree Renée Thomas, by Jenn Brissett
Article.
I woke up at three o'clock in the morning and it just hit me. Bam! I'm gonna do black science fiction!
The First Time We Met, by Maria Deira
Fiction.
I glanced down at my arm. The gash, which had been raw and red just a few seconds earlier, was gone. The only trace of the wound was a thin white scar that curved along the muscle. "You're welcome," she said.
Porlock, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Fish now swim through the / libraries of Atlantis
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Walls of the Universe by Paul Melko, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Wednesday: The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle, reviewed by Sara Polsky
Friday: The Dragon's Nine Sons and Three Unbroken by Chris Roberson, reviewed by Duncan Lawie

2/9/09

Obedience, by Brenna Yovanoff
Fiction.
She checked the cuffs of her jacket, tucked them deep into the tops of her gloves. Outside, pale hands seemed to float, palms flat against the windows. They were laughing, a storm of high-pitched giggles.
Raised by Wolves, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
Our biochemical keys fit fossil locks
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Shambling Towards Hiroshima by James Morrow, reviewed by Michael Froggatt
Wednesday: Subtle Edens, edited by Allen Ashley, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: Night Work by Thomas Glavinic, reviewed by Alan DeNiro

2/2/09

Petting the Singularity: An Interview with Mark von Schlegell, by Claire L. Evans
Article.
Presumably, off Earth, one-third gravity will be the norm so we'll be able actually to hold enormous books rather easily. These extreme books of the future will be extreme-length narratives constituting alternate realities and economies of their own.
This Must Be the Place, by Elliott Bangs
Fiction.
It's probably simplest to say that I first met Loren Wells in a club in San Francisco. We'll set aside for the moment that it wasn't the first time he'd met me.
Where Relativity Ends, by Elissa Malcohn
Poetry.
Time warped, in those days / when we took days for granted. / When calendars meant something.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Gargoyle by Andrew Davidson, reviewed by Richard Larson
Wednesday: City at the End of Time by Greg Bear, reviewed by Tony Keen
Friday: The Night Children by Kit Reed, reviewed by Michael Levy

1/26/09

Apocalypse How?, by Nicholas Seeley
Article.
We see ourselves as at the end of history, and a few of us even write books about it. But we're not; we're right in the middle of it. And cataclysm doesn't happen overnight.
The Shangri-La Affair (Part 2 of 2), by Lavie Tidhar
Fiction.
"Many wish to purchase peace," the Clockwork Boss said. "And too many would like to keep it."
pittsburgh o, by Martin Hazelbower
Poetry.
pittsburgh, o spidered—like / mars!—with canals, running / carb'nated milks of the moon—
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Spirit: or, The Princess of Bois Dormant by Gwyneth Jones, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Just After Sunset by Stephen King, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Friday: Long Walks, Last Flights and other Strange Journeys by Ken Scholes, reviewed by Niall Harrison

1/19/09

Lost Chance: Greek and Chinese Philosophy's Unrealized Romance, by Brian Trent
Article.
Over the course of two centuries, intellectual luminaries simultaneously emerged in Greece and China. . . . What would have happened had the two met?
The Shangri-La Affair (Part 1 of 2), by Lavie Tidhar
Fiction.
It came spilling over Asia like grains of rice measured into a pan. Digital systems were corrupted. Tailor-made viruses swept through urban populations, spread out to villages, sometimes merely killing, sometimes transforming people into ... into other things.
A Guide to the Air-Dependent, by Kaolin Imago Fire
Poetry.
Focus on the effort wasted / that makes you stronger.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Watermind by M.M. Buckner, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: Going Under by Justina Robson, reviewed by Kari Sperring
Friday: The Bell at Sealey Head by Patricia A. McKillip, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin

1/12/09

Elven Lays and Powerchords: Chaos, Revelry, and Community in Tolkien-themed Heavy Metal, by Stephanie Green
Article.
Why is it that thousands of metal fans worldwide see Tolkien's works as synonymous with the ideology of heavy metal, when Tolkien would have abhorred the music and its fans?
Greetings from Kampala, by Angela Ambroz
Fiction.
It was dangerous on such an epic level of dangerous that Ghada was awestruck by the captain's lethal levels of stupidity. If you went down the wrong Drop, the space-time anomalies could rip you apart.
The Time Traveler Takes His Nth Lover at a Point of Departure, by Bruce Boston and Marge Simon
Poetry.
Centuries have come and gone / in the flash of a passing station
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Best of Lucius Shepard, by Victoria Hoyle
Wednesday: The Spirit, reviewed by William Mingin
Friday: The Chronicles of the Black Company by Glen Cook, reviewed by Martin Lewis

1/5/09

Finale and Follow-Up, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Avatar: The Last Airbender wrapped up its third and final season earlier this year. Haven't seen it? You're missing the smartest fantasy on TV.
Sisters of the Blessed Diving Order of Saint Peter and Saint Andrew, by A.C. Wise
Fiction.
Lucy came to the Blessed Diving Order of Saint Peter and Saint Andrew in the usual way: her parents abandoned her as a babe in a little woven basket on the shore. Her first lullaby was the hush of waves rolling smoothed stone over stone and stringing tangled seaweed around her cradle.
Ascending, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
The escalator, rolling ever down, / has reached an end at last and here you lie
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 2008 In Review, by Our Reviewers
Wednesday: Lavinia by Ursula K. Le Guin, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Friday: METAtropolis edited by John Scalzi, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn

12/22/08

Can Life Compete?, by Keith Pike
Article.
If WoW [World of Warcraft] is the beginning, what will the middle look like?
Where is My Favorite Martian Hiding?, by Omar Vega
Article.
There was a time not long ago when the solar system was full of life. . . . Does it sound strange?
Engines of Survival, by Larissa Kelly
Fiction.
It's always the little things in the future that are the hardest to adjust to.
The Invisible Woman Runs for President, by Karen A. Romanko
Poetry.
A woman president is nothing new, / but an invisible woman president—that's change
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Other Worlds, Better Lives: A Howard Waldrop Reader—Selected Long Fiction 1989-2003, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Wednesday: Voices From Fairyland: The Fantastical Poems of Mary Coleridge, Charlotte Mew, and Sylvia Townsend Warner, edited and wth poems by Theodora Goss, reviewed by Karen J. Weyant
Friday: Queen of K'n-Yan by Asamatsu Ken, translated by Kathleen Taiji, reviewed by Kari Sperring

12/15/08

Speaking About Pancakes, by Sergey Gerasimov
Article.
Do we live in the aftermath of Chernobyl, or in the before-math of something bigger?
How to Hold Your Breath, by Meredith Schwartz
Fiction.
In eighth grade, two of the guys started whispering "smells like fish" to each other whenever I came near them.
Gourmand in Remission, by Ed Gavin
Poetry.
mindful of its bluer than blue bouquet
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Half a Crown by Jo Walton, reviewed by John Clute
Wednesday: Liberation by Brian Francis Slattery, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Friday: The Last Book by Zoran Živković, reviewed by Matt Denault

12/8/08

The Same Old Story (Part 2 of 2), by Naomi Bloch
Fiction.
Sarah was trying to come up with something friendly, but not empty, to say to her husband. Since the conversation in the lab they had kept their dialogue to a few safe, neutral subjects.
Bardo Crossing, by Suzette Haden Elgin
Poetry.
Leave her alone. / She is a poor small huddled thing,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Ant King and Other Stories by Benjamin Rosenbaum, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Winterstrike by Liz Williams, reviewed by David McWilliam
Friday: Shadowbridge and Lord Tophet by Gregory Frost, reviewed by Michael Levy

12/1/08

Confession of a Red Mage, by Paul Jessup
Article.
After playing Chrono Trigger, I went to the library, where they had one computer (one!) that was hooked up to the then newly found Internet. I browsed GeoCities pages, looking for other fans of this game and others, and found instead a community of programmers[.]
Beyond the Beep: Techniques and Styles of Video Game Music, by Mark Newheiser
Article.
[G]ame music is not written to accompany the spectacle of some scene being passively observed, but to accompany an activity. In this regard it shares some features with dance/exercise music.
The Same Old Story (Part 1 of 2), by Naomi Bloch
Fiction.
Sarah smiled at her. "Well, she certainly shares her mother's intelligence and charm. And those incredible violet eyes—it's hard not to fall in love with those." Nicole nodded, a bit bored. "That's how Jake ordered her, obviously."
Teacher's Pet, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Various stratagems for outwitting / the beast have been tried
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Song of Time by Ian R Macleod, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Dead Set, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: The Engine's Child by Holly Phillips, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin

11/24/08

Gort Power!: A 3-D Pete Cartoon, by Mike Fisher
Article.
Michael Rennie seems well cast as the strange alien Klaatu. Maybe that's because his head is as big as a window-mounted air conditioner . . .
Bouncing High into the Stupidsphere (Part One), by Iain Jackson
Column.
And a lot of these stories tread the line between interesting execution of interesting concept and "No, really, perhaps you should take this concept back to the drawing board and think about it for a little while longer. Or find better writers. Something. Really."
Up In the Air, by Richard Larson
Fiction.
"This doesn't have to be awkward," he said as we stood in line, boarding passes in hand. I almost laughed, but instead I regarded him soberly, or as soberly as I could considering the martini, the tequila shots, and our spontaneous rendezvous in the airport's public restroom.
Beowulf Goes to the Deli, by Tarun Shanker
Poetry.
They arrived at Heorot deli, / there was not a deli more magnificent
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Very Bad Deaths and Very Hard Choices by Spider Robinson, reviewed by Greg Beatty
Wednesday: Twelve Collections and The Teashop by Zoran Živković, reviewed by Lara Buckerton
Friday: Fast Foward 2, edited by Lou Anders, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro

11/17/08

Autumn 2008 in the Key of Schubert, by Jeffrey Johnson
Article.
The glimpses of Schubert's day-to-day life prove a relationship between the ordinary and the miraculous.
Until Forgiveness Comes, by K. Tempest Bradford
Fiction.
Sadana Manu, under-cleric of Iset, gave the sign for mourners to station themselves near the main blast sites for their glimpses of loved ones long gone.
Exiling the Earth, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
First, we sent away the trees, / then the bubble of breath
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Button, Button by Richard Matheson, reviewed by William Mingin
Wednesday: The Angel Maker by Stefan Brijs, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Friday: The Adoration of Jenna Fox by Mary E. Pearson, reviewed by Sara Polsky

11/10/08

What Killed the Robot Soldier?, by Ben Crispin
Article.
Did the Army receive their new machines on the radio-clogged battlefield, relieved that all of those worrying signal problems had been resolved . . . and then discover that they hadn't been?
Wii Fitness: Rocking the Hula Hoops (And the Weight Issues), by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
The release of the Wii Fit convinced me that I would actually use the Wii once I bought it, and having a ground floor apartment made it a morally defensible purchase.
Return (Part 2 of 2), by Eric Vogt
Fiction.
Before Tima had left, he and Svena used a 0.7-Turing AI to build a reactive construct of him. That construct was all that Vishi had known of her father.
Dream People, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
If dream people were the world / there would be no time / for reflection.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Field Guide to Surreal Botany, eds. Janet Chui and Jason Erik Lundberg, reviewed by Richard Larson
Wednesday: The Last Theorem by Arthur C. Clarke and Frederik Pohl, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Friday: The Temporal Void by Peter F. Hamilton, reviewed by Karen Burnham

11/3/08

Summer Movies 2008, by James Schellenberg
Column.
It's like I don't enjoy blockbusters any more — I feel lonely in my dislike of The Dark Knight, for example — but I keep going every summer. Why might that be?
Return (Part 1 of 2), by Eric Vogt
Fiction.
He wasn't Rapid Combat, but a standard and very lethal fight package was part of his Mass Dynamics Overtraining. He was very, very aware that the hand holding her to the wall was in a position to crush her trachea with just a small twitch.
The Astronaut's Return, by Marge Simon
Poetry.
Too long I've been in exile, / I've paid enough for my misdeeds.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The ABC Family Network show The Middleman, reviewed by Rov Kaveney
Wednesday: Or Else My Lady Keeps the Key by Kage Baker, reviewed by Donna Royston
Friday: The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness, reviewed by Martin Lewis

10/27/08

The Fantasy of Talking Back: Susanna Clarke's Historical Present in Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, by Elizabeth Hoiem
Article.
At the center of Susanna Clarke's historical novel are three characters, each a victim of Strange and Norrell's project to promote magic as rational and "English," and each corresponding to a social group historically marginalized in order to solidify Englishness as a cohesive category of identity[.]
Nine Sundays in a Row, by Kris Dikeman
Fiction.
I'm hunkered down in the tall grass, tail down, ears back. She leans back against the oak tree, wiggling her toes in the grass, big ugly boots beside her, moonlight throwing up shadows all around.
Heyiya, by Sonya Taaffe
Poetry.
Who would deal in straight lines with a god / of double faces?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Blonde Roots by Bernadine Evaristo, reviewed by Gwyneth Jones
Wednesday: The Wiscon Chronicles, volume 2, edited by L. Timmel Duchamp and Eileen Gunn, reviewed by Hannah Storm-Martin
Friday: The Last Reef and other stories by Gareth L. Powell, reviewed by Gene Melzack

10/20/08

A Revisionist History of Earthsea, by William Alexander
Article.
It is not easy to bring a Foucauldian understanding of historical contingency to high fantasy. The genre resists. Le Guin manages anyway.
Revisiting the Canon With Susannah! Of Wonders and Mervayls: Travels with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
The description of the feasts goes on for a while. There is pretty much everything you could want from a medieval shindig here: a whole fortnight of feasting, complete with jousts, drums and caroling, trumpets, banners, and beautifully dressed lords and ladies engaging in flirting and love play.
Just After Midnight, by Christie Skipper Ritchotte
Fiction.
He thinks there's a reset button: that people can die and start back at level one. He thinks Laura will walk through the door any minute now.
Moonfish, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Part trilobite, part lungfish, / it crawls about the basalt seas / of the Mare Tranquillitatis
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Dangerous Laughter by Steven Millhauser, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Filter House by Nisi Shawl, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Friday: Steampunk, eds. Ann and Jeff VanderMeer, and Extraordinary Engines, ed. Nick Gevers, reviewed by Duncan Lawie

10/13/08

Fang Fiction: An Interview with E. E. Knight, by Kelle Campbell
Article.
As for the fire breathing, I had a scary experience with a grease fire once . . . and it seemed to me that a dragon could probably put liquid fat into a big bladder and secrete a chemical that would light it up when exposed to oxygen.
The Lion and the Mouse, by Kaolin Imago Fire
Fiction.
It was a simple matter for Mouse to rip apart the thorny mess; and with that hindrance gone, even Lion's outdated meta-processes began to salve stressed joints and re-connect wounded couplings. Thanking Mouse profusely, Lion recalculated his entrance and A*'d his egress.
When the Vacuum Takes My Hand, by Holly Day
Poetry.
is it assault / to turn off the power
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: An Evil Guest by Gene Wolfe, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Two Views: Pandemonium by Daryl Gregory, reviewed by Amy O'Loughlin and Dan Hartland
Friday: Realms: the first year of Clarkesworld Magazine, edited by Nick Mamatas and Sean Wallace

10/6/08

Welcome to the Real World, by Iain Jackson
Column.
Don't do the crime if you can't do the time. That's the saying, right? So why is it that so many supervillains never quite seem to get around to doing time at all? And why is it that even when they do time, it winds up being strikingly short.
Swan Song, by Joanne Merriam
Fiction.
"High fever. Dehydration. Recurring dreams of swans," the doctor has noted in the description area.
Laurentia Burning, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
a singing in the south / a quickening rumble / a great shimmy /
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Paper Cities, edited by Ekaterina Sedia, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: Paper Cities: an anthology of urban fantasy, edited by Ekaterina Sedia, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Friday: The Turing Test by Chris Beckett, reviewed by Colin Harvey

9/29/08

From iTunes to the Bookshelves: The First Wave of Podcast Novelists, by Shaun Farrell
Article.
[W]hile the podcast novel has attracted thousands of fans, it is unclear whether famed and celebrated podcasters can generate similar enthusiasm from the book-buying public, many of whom have never heard of podcasting. Several authors, however, are poised as forerunners who may well determine the long-term publication prospects of the fiction podcaster.
Virtual Difference, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
As a researcher who firmly believes that there are more similarities than differences between social interaction online and social interaction face-to-face, and whose own research in fact hinges on the assumption that classical social theory will be born out in virtual interaction, it's nice to see some confirmation.
Kimberley Ann Duray Is Not Afraid, by Leah Bobet
Fiction.
They bombed the clinic again at seven a.m. that Friday, between my shower and the hunt for a clean pair of socks.
Hill and Pail, by Mary Alexandra Agner
Poetry.
She drags his body down, away from town, / to bury with the others, flattened grass / running wrong way against my scalp. /
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Steel Remains by Richard Morgan, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Wednesday: Unwelcome Bodies by Jennifer Pelland, reviewed by Tanya Brown
Friday: The Quiet War by Paul McAuley, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum

9/22/08

Who Killed Thomas M. Disch?, by Sam J. Miller
Article.
[A]fter reading his blog, revisiting his books, speaking with Tom's friends, and interviewing members of the SF literary community, I saw a total of five suspects emerge.
Adventure, Zombies, Tragic Love, and Chess, by James Schellenberg
Column.
The only thing I've said definitively so far is that I hate trying to make these kinds of definitions. So allow me to jump straight into the works at hand and see what I can make of this mess.
Cowboy Angel (Part 2 of 2), by Samantha Cope
Fiction.
She stood, looked out the window, and she wanted to say, It'll be okay and, Trust me. And I love you. She couldn't, so there was silence.
Black Swan, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
this truest / of rarae aves still has, at least in game / theory, the potential for existence /
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Night Sessions by Ken MacLeod, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Superpowers by David J Schwartz, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Friday: The Luminous Depths by David Herter, reviewed by Finn Dempster

9/15/08

Founding Mothers: The Jeanne Gomoll Interview, by Adrian Simmons
Article.
SF and feminism are the perfect partners. . . . When I was reading science fiction in the late '70s, it offered tools for changing the world.
Learning to Write, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
There is something off about them, something twanging in my ears, the tone of an arrogant man trying to pass himself off as humble or simple. Perhaps I am in the wrong mood.
Cowboy Angel (Part 1 of 2), by Samantha Cope
Fiction.
Roxanne shuffled the corners of her cards together on her thigh, focused herself through the pain in her head, and called him. Come over here, to me. Now.
Skywatching, by John Grey
Poetry.
It takes a stalwart soul to find the light these days, / to go beyond the city and its affectations of / brightness /
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Sideways in Crime edited by Lou Anders, reviewed by William Mingin
Wednesday: Midnight Never Come by Marie Brennan, reviewed by R. J. Burgess
Friday: Year Million, edited by Damien Broderick, reviewed by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro

9/8/08

Rimfall, Finger Pokes, and Angry Letters: Discworld's Fantastic Reaches, by Donna Royston
Article.
It is the peril—and the paradoxical lure—of the Rim that elevates Discworld from amusement to something strange and terrifying.
The Future Hunters, by Christopher J. Clarke
Fiction.
The ancient grey-walled fortress, built from the bones of the city, now housed the Library and the Academy. Kale entered under the bell tower and made her way across the hard red-earth enclosure, basket at her side, greeting several of her acolytes as they went to study.
Upon the death of my host and waiting for uplink: by Event Horizon, formerly of the Oracle Duality Liselle Marie Michaud / Event Horizon, by C.S. MacCath
Poetry.
It is cold. / No, not cold, but cooling / And still, except for bacteria / That favor flesh. /
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Anathem by Neal Stephenson, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: Implied Spaces by Walter Jon William, reviewed by Dustin Kurtz
Friday: The Gone-Away World by Nick Harkaway, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont

9/1/08

There Once Was a Fish, by Brandon Myers
Fiction.
"Do not touch them," her mother warned her, "they're very fragile."
Atlantis, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
All for / now is calm. No one / needs mention / the hubris of this Icarian /
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Wit's End/The Case of the Imaginary Detective by Karen Joy Fowler, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, by Junot Diaz, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Friday: Atmospheric Disturbances by Rivka Galchen, reviewed by David McWilliam

8/25/08

Xenobiology At the Extremes: And You Think Your Neighbors Are Weird?, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
Over the past decade or so, spurred in part by the biological revolution and in part by our increasing confidence that earth-mass planets are potentially common, astrobiology has started to come of age.
The Secret Identity, by Richard Butner
Fiction.
We were studying for midterms when I found out about the ghost.
Maya Blue (at Chichen Itza), by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
Above us in the silence yet to come, / deep thunder speaks — then lightning-axes fall
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Neuropath by Scott Bakker and Blindsight by Peter Watts, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Wednesday: The Roswell Poems by Rane Arroyo, reviewed by Karen J. Weyant
Friday: The Del Rey Book of Science Fiction and Fantasy, edited by Ellen Datlow, reviewed by Richard Larson

8/18/08

Welcome to the Real World, by Iain Jackson
Column.
Of course, the advantage of having both invented and mobile geography is that you can demolish it without aggravating people quite so much. I mean, readers might get just the teensiest bit upset at a superhero fight that knocks the capital off the Chrysler Building, for example — or they might think it's the coolest thing ever!
Sex with Ghosts, by Sarah Kanning
Fiction.
Sex. All those complications, all that messiness. It's like watching a group of enthusiasts really get into a hobby that you don't share.
Mondrian's War, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
When did he first discover this gift for equilibrium? / An urgent revelation in a haystack-mounded field?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Speculative Japan, edited by Gene van Troyer and Grania Davis, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Everything is Sinister by David Llwellyn and The Heritage by Will Ashon, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: Year's Bests edited by Jonathan Strahan, and David Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer, reviewed by Karen Burnham

8/11/08

From Console to Celluloid: Uwe Boll and the Art of Adapting Video Games for the Big Screen, by Nader Elhefnawy
Article.
[It is] very difficult to turn even great games into substantial films without ditching or overhauling the source material—something that Boll has never been interested in doing.
Glitz, Flash, and Fun, by James Schellenberg
Column.
A look at some of the recent videogame titles for the PC that are focused on creating spectacle. Some even have a decent storyline to go along with the eye candy.
The Emerald King, by J. Kenneth Sargeant
Fiction.
Everything is green today and I'm brave again.
The Vampire's Reflection, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
he wakes to the moon's glassy stare
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The X-Files: I Want to Believe, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Iron Angel by Alan Campbell, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Friday: Sputnik Caledonia by Andrew Crumey, reviewed by Michael Froggatt

8/4/08

Searching Under the Rug: Interfaces, Puzzles, and the Evolution of Adventure Games, by Mark Newheiser
Article.
What decades of evolution have done for the [adventure game] genre is refine the user interface. The genre's improvements are largely independent of the technology used and have gradually evolved in response to user feedback and designers' efforts to make the puzzles clear yet challenging.
Ordinary Zhang, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
A couple years ago, I picked up another copy of China Mountain Zhang at a used bookstore, but I didn't dare read it. Much of the science fiction I had loved as a teen had turned out, when read as an adult, to feel simplistic, clunky, shallow. I preferred my memories.
Down the Well, by Alaya Dawn Johnson
Fiction.
I saw her clearly, then: beautiful and terrible, ancient and radical, a goddess as much as any human can be. Killing a hexapedal carnivore with a hand-made spear, hiding for two days from a giant amphibious jellyfish desperate for food, surviving alone in the Well for five years before the computers on this side even registered the malfunction—those rumors had floated around the agency for decades. I'd found it impossible to believe that such a small, unassuming woman had done all they said she did.
Dystopian Dusk, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
if they had slapped blinkers / on our eyes, narrowing our vision
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Collected Poems by Mervyn Peake, edited by R.W. Maslen, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: The Affinity Bridge by George Mann, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: Escapement by Jay Lake, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

7/28/08

Revisiting the Canon with Susannah! Wyrms, Wyrd, and Tolkien: Beowulf, Part 3, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
Bleeding and cowed, Grendel runs back to the marches to die. Is that the end of the story? Well, of course not. The poem would be a rollicking good tale even if that were the end, but it wouldn't be an epic.
Called Out to Snow Crease Farm, by Constance Cooper
Fiction.
Margit worked the latch-bar of the gate, which was socketed in the bony pit of what must be an adzehorn skull. With its broad-bladed prongs removed—for tools perhaps?—and the flesh long gone, the skull looked bald and vulnerable, as homely as a cattle skull.
Von Neumann's Poem, by Aaron Benson
Poetry.
Do not read this verse
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Hello Summer, Goodbye and I Remember Pallahaxi by Michael G. Coney, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Wednesday: The Sharing Knife: Passage by Lois McMaster Bujold, reviewed by Greg Beatty
Friday: The Ninth Circle by Alex Bell, reviewed by Tanya Brown

7/21/08

Of Preachers and Storytellers: An Interview with Sheri S. Tepper, by Neal Szpatura
Article.
When the judges arrive to see how we've done, I don't think they'll rate us as "keepers." I believe there will be judges who will decide which races deserve to go on existing to accomplish whatever the universal task is. I also believe that all of us—the human race—have at most one shared human soul.
The Magician's House (Part 2 of 2), by Meghan McCarron
Fiction.
"How much do you want to know about magic?" he said. He was nervous, watching me carefully like I might bolt.
A Posthuman, Blind and Appendage-less Stump of Flesh Experiences the Sensation of Reading Various Editions of "Gravity's Rainbow" in a Temperature Controlled Room with Cloroxed-White Walls., by Christopher Hellstrom
Poetry.
I could experience it as a Medieval text
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: The Margarets by Sheri S Tepper, reviewed by Nic Clarke and Sherryl Vint
Wednesday: Lost Boys by James Miller, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: Martin Martin's on the Other Side by Mark Wernham, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont

7/14/08

The Magician's House (Part 1 of 2), by Meghan McCarron
Fiction.
The magician was a tall, spindly man with surprisingly thick hands and dark, graying hair. He folded into the chair like a marionette. To meet me, he wore black stretch pants, a silk pajama shirt, a burgundy cardigan, and decaying black flip-flops. If I had seen him on the street, I would have laughed, but in the oven-room he looked right at home, whereas I felt self-conscious in my khaki shorts and pre-faded T-shirt. I had even blow-dried my hair. For the first time, instead of feeling invisible in my prepster clothes, I felt exposed.
Why She Canceled Her Online Dating Membership: A Martian Female Responds (a triolet), by Terrie Leigh Relf
Poetry.
You ask why I'll no longer date a human? /
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Flood by Stephen Baxter, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: The Princes of the Golden Cage by Nathalie Mallet, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: Elric: The Stealer of Souls (Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibon�: Volume 1) by Michael Moorcock, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy

7/7/08

Lingua Rpga & the Writer, by Steve Berman
Article.
I brought together a few other authors—friends of mine once deeply involved with gaming and now telling stories in their own, unique voices. Imagine them around the table: Holly Black, wielder of the coveted Andre Norton Award; Will Ludwigsen, a half-curmudgeon; Cecil Castellucci, the only person to become a bard by first edition rules; and Jim Hines, deservedly proud of his 18/00 career.
Marsh Gods, by Ann Leckie
Fiction.
"Gods with enough power to make unlikely things happen are free to make pronouncements about the future," the crane said. "If I happened to be wrong, I would have said something untrue, and that could be disastrous for me."
Misfortune Cookie, by Lark Beltran
Poetry.
No tears, just plots to keep the moving finger from writing their scary scripts. No doubt, rewriting,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Galactic Suburbia: Recovering Women's Science Fiction by Lisa Yaszek, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Wednesday: Dreamers of the Day by Mary Doria Russell, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Friday: Omega by Christopher Evans, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

6/30/08

Jimmy's Roadside Cafe, by Ramsey Shehadeh
Fiction.
After the world ended, Jimmy set up a roadside cafe in the median of I-95, just north of the Fallston exit.
V.D., by Ed Gavin
Poetry.
Kiss her, she tastes of broken glass / and promises, a cold gray ash / upon your tongue. But each adieu
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: An Experimental Life: books by and about Naomi Mitchison, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: On Spoiling the Fourth Season of Battlestar Galactica, by Roz Kaveney
Friday: Shadow Gate by Kate Elliott, reviewed by Juliet E. McKenna

6/23/08

Wastelands: Stories of the Apocalypse: An Interview with Editor John Joseph Adams, by Rob Darnell
Article.
Believing in the Unbelievable: A brief history of black holes, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
Black holes are the Tyrannosaurus Rex of astronomy: mysterious and dangerous, the end result of millions of years of evolution, perfect predators which hold our fascinated attention all out of proportion to their actual rarity.
My Greedy Plea For Help, by Ted Prodromou
Fiction.
"You're doing meta-wishes," he said, "and meta-wishes are trouble. Ever since people started reading Hofstadter, all of a sudden I've got to worry about punks like you erasing causality entirely."
Some Random Hero, by Marcie Lynn Tentchoff
Poetry.
Her life too short to waste / on other people's fantasies, / she went to find her own,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Singularity's Ring by Paul Melko, reviewed by Gwyneth Jones
Wednesday: The Philosopher's Apprentice by James Morrow, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Friday: Celebration, edited by Ian Whates, reviewed by Graham Sleight

6/16/08

In Lieu of a Thank You, by Gwynne Garfinkle
Fiction.
Unlike you, Ernest was ill-versed in the ways of love, hearts and flowers and everything designed to trap a woman. I was trapped by Ernest, of course, but there was something honest about the arrangement.
Dancing with Stones, by Elizabeth Barrette
Poetry.
All true things are known by stone, / whose wisdom is grown ponderous / with its rounding of the year's ring.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Torchwood, season two, reviewed by Tim Phipps
Wednesday: The Ex Files: The Lost Tales and the return of Babylon 5, reviewed by Iain Clark
Friday: Drinking the Blood of the Dead: The Nines, Southland Tales and Doomsday, reviewed by Martin Lewis

6/9/08

Ender's Decline, by James Schellenberg
Column.
There's just something about this particular tale: a young child growing up in difficult circumstances, taken away from family and sent into intense military training, and then facing ever more difficult obstacles in the pursuit of saving humanity.
Running, by Benjamin Crowell
Fiction.
"In this situation we give you a two-week emergency air stipend, but it's intentionally set so low that you can't really live on it. Frontier here, can't afford to support people who aren't contributing. You'll need to find some way to make up the gap."
CSI: TRANSYLVANIA, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Please update your awareness
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Farah Mendlesohn's Rhetorics of Fantasy, reviewed by John Clute
Wednesday: Nicola Barker's Darkmans, reviewed by Alan DeNiro
Friday: Jaine Fenn's Principles of Angels, reviewed by Dan Hartland

6/2/08

boo., by Iain Jackson
Column.
So why is it that horror on film or in books or audio works, and horror in comics just kind of ... lays there?
On the Eyeball Floor, by Tina Connolly
Fiction.
People in Organs go home coated with grease and vinegar; people in Bones have lost fingers to the machines, and still nobody wants the job where a hundred half-live cyborgs line up in rows, twitching when your back is turned.
Family Poet, by Rolli
Poetry.
One night, he vanished
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Axiomatic and Dark Integers by Greg Egan, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Wednesday: Quarantine and Teranesia by Greg Egan, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Friday: Incandescence by Greg Egan, reviewed by Adam Roberts

5/26/08

The Rebirth of Grue, by Paul Jessup
Article.
With classic or retro gaming hitting a new peak, the superstars of the interactive fiction underground are gaining more and more exposure, and a boom is happening all across the board in popularity and experimentation.
Games to Life: An Interview with Lori, Corey, and Michael Cole of Transolar Games, by Joseph Howse
Article.
[T]he real changes and innovations will come from the indies and the college students who have a love of games and, now, the tools to make them. After all, when Corey and I started out, we made up the game theories as we went along. We started out as amateurs, but it didn't stop us from making great games. I believe that these newcomers will be the ones to pull the life support from the old, creatively dead companies and breathe new life into computer games.
The Antidote to Dystopia, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Two stories of technology and society, one true and one speculative. For Alice Ramsay, technology became a liberation; for Forster's Vashti, technology created a prison.
No Love for the Middleman, by Tony Frazier
Fiction.
Three things could cause an explosion like that: a bomb, a high-velocity impact like a plane crash or a meteorite, or a super. With experience, you can pretty much tell which is which, just by the sound. This sounded like a super.
Transformation, by J. C. Runolfson
Poetry.
I am writing
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Roz Kaveney's Superheroes!, reviewed by Tony Keen
Wednesday: Robert VS Redick's The Red Wolf Conspiracy, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Friday: John Meaney's Dark Blood, reviewed by Duncan Lawie

5/19/08

Questioning the Gaming Culture, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
Women, who are less likely to have grown up gaming and in general more likely to be sensitive to sexism, are understandably often put off by the sexist tropes of the medium, and frustrated by veteran gamers blowing off any critique of the latest incarnation of those tropes.
Tell Her, by Rachel Kincaid
Fiction.
I remember what it said because it was weird, not because it was important. MORE IN HEAVEN & EARTH. I know it was August, because that was when Regina was moving out.
Paper People, by Bruce Buston
Poetry.
If the world / were paper people
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: John Kessel's The Baum Plan for Financial Independence, reviewed by Dustin Kurz
Wednesday: Iron Man, reviewed by Iain Clark
Friday: L. Timmel Duchamp's Blood in the Fruit, reviewed by Lesley A. Hall

5/12/08

Hanged Man's Gallery, by Malcolm McClinton
Art.
I have found a nice little niche for myself that satisfies my natural anti-authoritism, reclusiveness and my need for adulation all at once.
The Farmer Vanishes, by Marian Kensler
Article.
[M]any American children have unknowingly become acquainted with Ambrose Bierce's fiction well before the obligatory high school reading of "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge."
Revisiting the Canon with Susannah! Formal Boasts, Magic Armor, and Watchers in the Water: Beowulf, Part 2, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
If your world-view was shaped by Tolkien, then it probably seems very natural to you that magic swords and talismans exist in the world. In Tolkien's world, and the worlds of his contemporaries and his imitators, such objects had usually been made by dwarves or elves, a Very Long Time ago; or by someone who used to be a dwarf or elf or angel before he turned bad � you know the drill.
The Refutation of Rosemont, by Barth Anderson
Fiction.
Though Jeremiah Rosemont used his authority and status several years ago to liberate me from my tenure at Liggett & LaSalle, and the burden of the salary that went with it, my life's work is still a search for living, modern myths that make sense of the world—but more, that make the world.
How Wizards Duel, by Jessica P. Wick
Poetry.
I know your fingers. / I know them in the salt-sea. / I know them, charcoal-smudged, / smelling of smoke.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Alastair Reynolds' House of Suns, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: David Thomson's Suspects, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Friday: McCalmont J and Harrison N. Juan Antonio Bayona's El Orfanato: a psychiatric review

5/5/08

The Gadgey, by Alan Campbell
Fiction.
Besides, E.T. was plastic-looking, not like the proper aliens he'd seen on Sky when he was round at Gordie's. Not like this thing. This thing had a whole bunch of tentacles, like wee willies, hanging from its chin.
Thousand Flower Sun, by Jennifer Crow
Poetry.
We waited in the light / of our thousand-flower sun
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: What It Is We Do When We Read Science Fiction by Paul Kincaid, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: Last Argument of Kings by Joe Abercrombie, reviewed by Larry Nolen
Friday: The Shadow Year by Jeffrey Ford, reviewed by Michael Levy

4/28/08

Tribute to Dean Koontz: Forty Years as a Published Novelist, by Michael McCarty
Article.
Dean Koontz is a rarity in this business: someone who cares. He could have simply signed my books and sent me on my merry way, but instead he reached out, he made an effort . . . and he gave me a career.
Fear Nothing: Interview with Dean Koontz, by Michael McCarty
Article.
There is such a thing as "reckless caring," and by God there has to be in order for any civilization to arise and to be sustained.
Ender's Peak, by James Schellenberg
Column.
So it was with some trepidation that I started a project to listen to all eight audiobooks in the Ender's Game series.
Five Good Things About Meghan Sheedy (Part 2 of 2), by A.M. Dellamonica
Fiction.
The dust bomb had been concealed under the steps of the infirmary, just on the edge of the playground. Dispersal had spread it like a ball of seeds from a dandelion, and now the infirmary was missing a perfect quarter-sphere of its structure.
Diaspora, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
The Word fractured then, like a crystalline / vase, and has been cracking and / splintering ever since.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The 2008 Arthur C Clarke Award Shortlist—Part One, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: The 2008 Arthur C Clarke Award Shortlist—Part Two, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Friday: Jonathan Barnes's The Domino Men, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein

4/21/08

Zombie Kings Sing Songs of BRAAAAAAAINS!, by Iain Jackson
Column.
I have a theory. Now, it's coming completely out of the air, and no doubt displaying a fine ignorance of history, religion, psychology, sociology, and several other -ologies, but bear with me.
Five Good Things About Meghan Sheedy (Part 1 of 2), by A.M. Dellamonica
Fiction.
It was a way of dealing, Dinah knew, and she tried to ignore Aidan as he threw an imaginary grenade and then made a sprinkling motion over Jesse, a finger-waving shorthand that used to mean falling snow.
Topquark, by Gene van Troyer
Poetry.
You are the top quark / in the particle stream blasting through your nerves
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Starry Rift edited by Jonathan Strahan, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Wednesday: Wildwood Dancing and Cybele's Secret by Juliet Marillier, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Friday: Dark Space by Marianne de Pierres, reviewed by R. J. Burgess

4/14/08

Arwen's Morbid Sanctuary, by Paula Friedlander
Art.
Silhouette art has a long history in many cultures. From silhouette portraits popular in the 1700's to traditional cut paper art in China and Poland, it is a beautiful art form using the contrast of dark and light, shadows and illumination.
The Wizard in the Space Station: A Look Back at the Works of the Late Sir Arthur C. Clarke, by Nicholas Seeley
Article.
The idea of a wizard in a space station may seem strange or contradictory—even dangerous in its invocation of pure fantasy to describe one of the great pioneers of "hard" science fiction. But it is the role Clarke played most of his life: a mythologized figure of intellect and prescience, standing on the shadowy frontier of modern science.
The Hero, Pulped, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
One huge girder catapulted twenty blocks, pierced the roof of a subway tunnel and jackknifed the leading car of an eight-car train. Passengers were pulped. There had been sixty persons in that first car. There was nothing that could be called human in the wreckage.
Valiant on the Wing, by Chris Szego
Fiction.
"I'm terribly sorry," she said, in a thin and lilting voice, "but it seems. . . ." Then she fell, a leaf dropping, onto the polished wooden floor.
The Calendar of the Dead, by Jacqueline West
Poetry.
The uselessness of time / at the end / of breakfast, bedtime, dinner and sunrise.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Iain M Banks's Matter, reviewed by Gwyneth Jones
Wednesday: Victor Pelevin's The Sacred Book of the Werewolf, reviewed by Michael Froggatt
Friday: Jason Burdett's Bangkok Haunts, reviewed by Jason Erik Lundberg

4/7/08

Who's Afraid of Nanotech?, by Corie Ralston
Article.
If even a fraction of the imagined applications pan out, nanotech will have an immense impact in all areas of human life, from medicine to transportation to commerce to war.
About the Wii Hype, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
"What the hell," I thought. "It looks better than Guitar Hero. And what kind of video game columnist has never played a Wii?"
In Ashes, by Helen Keeble
Fiction.
My brother had frozen in place, his whole body canted forward like a hunting cat, and his eyes fixed on the smouldering embers in the fireplace just visible behind our father's folded form. It was the first fire he'd seen for years.
Monoculture, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
swirling with faces I don't know they / mouth words contort
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Bone Key by Sarah Monette, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: Last Dragon by J.M. McDermott, reviewed by Michael Levy
Friday: Worshipping Small Gods by Richard Parks, reviewed by Richard Larson

3/31/08

The Cyborgs Are Coming!, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
OK, I'll admit that cyborgs are perhaps not exactly traditional harbingers of spring, but for that matter, when was the last time you saw an actual rabbit delivering eggs?
Ki Do (The Way of the Trees), by Sarah Thomas
Fiction.
Our twin maples pass as much as fifteen minutes a day in chitchat, but they only speak to each other. I fear neither of them will ever be great artists unless one of them dies.
Our Father, the Colonel, Home on Earthleave, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Our father (who art from heaven) / sleeps standing-up, in an anti- / gravity chamber, but Mother ...
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Michael Swanwick's The Dragons of Babel, reviewed by John Clute
Wednesday: Cory Doctorow's Little Brother, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Friday: Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles, reviewed by Iain Clark

3/24/08

Revisiting the Canon with Susannah! Blood, Gore, and Syncretic Metaphysics: Beowulf, Part 1, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
By the time you get to this point in the book, a few things have become glaringly clear to you. One is that every game of D&D you have ever played owes a gigantic debt to Beowulf. Another is that the only people who might possibly find this book boring are obviously people who don't like Tolkien, or video games, or fun.
Linkworlds (Part 2 of 2), by Will McIntosh
Fiction.
"Tweel, I think I've spied an unrecorded world! Come take a look!"
This, a Kind of Prayer, by Kendall Evans
Poetry.
That my skeletal remains might commingle / With a dire wolf's bones
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Shock of the Old by David Edgerton, reviewed by Bruce Sterling
Wednesday: Rewired by James Patrick Kelly and John Kessel, reviewed by Roz Kaveney
Friday: Ascendancies by Bruce Sterling, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy

3/17/08

Transformed Minds: Jamil Nasir Discusses War, Culture, and How Our Dreams Determine Our Reality, by Nicholas Seeley
Article.
A lot of what science fiction does is overthrow assumptions that we have about the world, and it's much easier to do that if you've already had that experience.
The Universe in a Pita: An Interview with Nir Yaniv, by Lavie Tidhar
Article.
Every SF writer, if he or she is not heartless, must have at least one story dealing with Zeppelins.
Final Issue, by James Schellenberg
Column.
The series covers the next five years of life on our planet: survival, sex, cloning, road trips, an Amazon cult, pirates, androids, monkeys, and much more. Will human civilization die out in one generation?
Linkworlds (Part 1 of 2), by Will McIntosh
Fiction.
I didn't like the way all the marbles were piled on top of each other, because that's not how the worlds are. Worlds have lots of space between them, and they whiz around, and they bounce off the edges of the universe and whiz back toward the middle, or they bounce off other worlds, only worlds don't collide much any more because people steer them with their singing.
So Many Lullabies, by Mary Alexandra Agner
Poetry.
I'm not the type of man / who needs a son,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The 2008 William L. Crawford Award Shortlist, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle (part one)
Wednesday: The 2008 William L. Crawford Award Shortlist, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle (part two)
Friday: Ben Peek's Black Sheep, reviewed by Martin Lewis

3/10/08

Lost Pictures, Lost Visions, by Damir Radic
Art.
The first half of the 20th century was marked by radical ideas and the creation of the new technologies. The evidence of the time, photographs and posters, still carry the strength of this lost era.
Indie Boy Strikes? Again!, by Iain Jackson
Column.
Perfection makes for boring fiction. It's much more interesting to put a shiny high-tech outside in contrast to the rotten, damaged insides of the real society in question.
Kip, Running, by Genevieve Williams
Fiction.
Almost as one, the runners leap from the shelter roof. When the maglev leaves the station, they'll be on top of it, heading for the labyrinthine transfer station beneath the eye of the ancient, decaying Space Needle.
Werepenguin, by Joanne Merriam
Poetry.
Little things make her love him: / he says he'll call and does,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Sword From Red Ice by JV Jones, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Halting State by Charles Stross, reviewed by David V Barrett
Friday: Four Novels of the 1960s by Philip K Dick, reviewed by Adam Roberts

3/3/08

"Junior, you aren't shaping up too angelically": Queerness in Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land, by Allyn Howey
Article.
The queerness of the text lies in the author's ability to recognize the social construction of sexuality, and effectively posit that it is the very existence of these constructs which "queers" non-normative practices.
An Ocean Going Back to the Skies, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
The fright causes some of the screaming, but it would be better if fewer people stuck stakes into their little bits of land and instead joined in the joy of a new cartography.
All Talk, by Will Ludwigsen
Fiction.
Colin rubs his temples with practiced drama. His eyelids drop and his breathing slows. He holds up his palm toward a young blonde tour guide.
For His First Tattoo, The Robot Considers Several Different Designs, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
In the end, the pulsing needle, with its / beam of light, scores / the metal deeply...
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Paolo Bacigalupi's Pump Six and Other Stories, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Vandana Singh's Of Love and Other Monsters, reviewed by Richard Larson
Friday: Stephen Baxter's Weaver, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont

2/25/08

Conversations in Deep Time: The Greg Bear Interview, by Michael Lohr
Article.
Science fiction writers since H. G. Wells have been read by politicians and world leaders, and invited to participate in discussions on the present and the future. That dialog is still going on�I've been invited to numerous government-sponsored seminars and analysis sessions, along with quite a few of my colleagues.
Holodecks, Robot Girlfriends, and the Virtual Vision Quest, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
Games, of course, are always constructed. They have rules. So does the universe; we call them physics, but in general the rules of games are better understood, and perhaps thus more satisfying.
Dead, by Haddayr Copley-Woods
Fiction.
She'd vaguely imagined that as soon as the gunshot rang out, the police, or at least security, would surround her. She hadn't made a plan beyond the shooting, so in the absence of one, she just kept walking home, where she waited for the police at the kitchen table, the gun in her lap.
Disciples of Paradox, by David Memmott
Poetry.
in a wheelchair spaceship
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Swiftly by Adam Roberts, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Rome Burning by Sophia McDougall, reviewed by Tony Keen
Friday: The Fade by Chris Wooding, reviewed by Colin Harvey

2/18/08

Still Seeking Signals: SETI Today, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
So how about finding some new civilizations? Are there any out there? Have our decades of listening made any progress - or are we perhaps truly alone after all?
Where We Live, by Daniel J. Pinney
Fiction.
He emerged first with a crate of unburned incense, a second time with a blasphemous but remarkable painted ceramic statuette of the Prophet, the third time with a round mirror, almost a meter across, perfect blown glass backed with silver inside a ring of something golden. My father flashed it to me in triumph, catching the sun, and then he tumbled backwards.
Poultry, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
there is / no apparition in the shroud
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Stephen King's Duma Key, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Liz Williams's Precious Dragon and Bloodmind, reviewed by Donna Royston
Friday: Tobias Buckell's Ragamuffin, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

2/11/08

To Meet You, by Kathi Day
Art.
I don't think to myself "Ah, today is a cat day." when I wake up, but sometimes I think "Ah, today was a cat day." when I go to sleep. (It can be very frustrating to have a dragon day when you need to draw a cat.)
Well-stocked Larders: Food and Diet of Hobbits, by Stephanie Green
Article.
Tolkien's choice of foods reflect his concept of the ancient Middle-earth chronology. These descriptions can also provide insights into Tolkien's underlying theme of the Hobbits as nostalgic English yeomen.
We Love Deena, by Alice Sola Kim, illustration by Hellen Jo
Fiction.
I don't remember which attempt it was, how many people I had been so far. But this time I was Pam, a girl who worked at the bookstore in Deena's neighborhood. Pam, whose hair was the same color as her skin, a monochromatic honey shade that would have been boring and dreary on other people but looked delicious on Pam. I was reasonably sure that if Deena didn't love me anymore, she would love Pam.
The Gambler, by Sonya Taaffe
Poetry.
a comet glitters / like gunpowder,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Debatable Space by Philip Palmer, reviewed by Paul Raven
Wednesday: Kethaniby Eric Brown, reviewed by Michael Levy
Friday: The SFWA European Hall of Fame, edited by James Morrow and Kathryn Morrow, reviewed by Martin Lewis

2/4/08

My Year of McCaffrey, by James Schellenberg
Column.
The melodrama and constant friction between characters was also a source of near-hapless fascination, while I loved having volume after volume to read, following the florid storylines and science fiction developments with great avidity.
Tokyo Rising, by Lynne Hawkinson
Fiction.
The fifth time hurt him. That was when the giant secret government robots went berserk and bombed the schools during the national examinations. Kai lost his young daughter, and he had not yet found a way to replace her
I'll Keep a Green Lantern Burning, by Lee Battersby
Poetry.
Batts has been living out of the back seat / Since Missus Batman threw him into the street
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Cloverfield reviewed by Roz Kaveney
Wednesday: Daniel Abraham's The Long Price: Shadow and Betrayal, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll
Friday: Dislocations, edited by Ian Whates, reviewed by Duncan Lawie

1/28/08

2007 In Review, Or, Fun Stuff What I Have Read Last Year, by Iain Jackson
Column.
Do I remember the book in question? Fondly, or as though it were a four-color root canal? Edifying or not, did I like reading it?
Looking for Friendship, Maybe More, by Corie Ralston
Fiction.
Fellow Station residents: The D'ohrahd are here to subjugate the human race! High-Earth Station is only their first conquest!! Earth will be next!! Stop them now!!! Join us at the protest at the D'ohrahd Welcoming tonight!!!!
Zeitghosts, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Later, give or take a millennium, / in the food court next / to Chronautica, we share lunch,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Bad Blood by Rhiannon Lassiter, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Mindscape by Andrea Hairston, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Friday: Dangerous Offspring by Steph Swainston, reviewed by David Soyka

1/21/08

Of Muses and Ghosts, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
The last conversation I had with my father was about a movie.
How to Hide Your Heart, by Deborah Coates
Fiction.
People call him. People he doesn't know. People who don't want anything to do with him or the things he hunts. They leave him messages—skeptical, frightened, defiant, crazy. They don't believe in what they've seen, can't imagine that it exists. They call anyway.
A Creation Myth, by Holly Dworken Cooley
Poetry.
So Rock created stone in his own image
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Ink by Hal Duncan and In the Cities of Coin and Spice by Catherynne M Valente, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Christopher Barzak's One for Sorrow, reviewed by Richard Larson
Friday: T.A. Pratt's Blood Engines, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin

1/14/08

By Full Moon's Light, by Karl Nordman
Art.
From a curious lad to full time professional, art has been the driving force throughout my entire existwnce.
Games on Facebook: Playing "With" Your Friends, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
That guy from my department, on the other hand, apparently forged right ahead and sank to inhuman depths of cannibalism
The End of Tin, by Bill Kte'pi
Fiction.
When Nick Chopper was a boy and not yet tin, they used to say every mirror was haunted. It's why the wights wouldn't look in them; it's why if you broke one there was hell to pay by seven sundowns, and if you didn't pay hell would come to collect.
Dsonoqua on Lewis, The Outer Hebrides, by Neile Graham
Poetry.
She's a cranky tourist here. Exposed / with no forest to back herself into.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Mike Ashley's Gateways to Forever, reviewed by William Mingin
Wednesday: Gary Gibson's Stealing Light, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Friday: Karen Miller's The Awakened Mage, reviewed by R.J. Burgess

1/7/08

Lucy in the Sky With Nanodiamonds, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
Tiny nanodiamonds inside meteorites appear to be true "star bits," born in the edges of dying stars long, long before our solar system ever formed.
Still Living, by J. J. Irwin
Fiction.
The murals are butterflies of time, pinned to the wall in a semblance of life. When Carlo died they became silent for a time, watchful, but in the month since they have gone back to each other, back to love and joy and the sunshine coming down on them in thick, buttery strokes. They're paintings; they don't have space for prolonged sorrow.
Moonomania, by F.J. Bergmann
Poetry.
If we had more moons, / months would fracture into innumerable shards
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 2007 In Review, by our reviewers
Wednesday: The Red Men by Matthew de Abaitua, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: Till Human Voices Wake Us by Mark Budz, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum

12/17/07

R3 (Part 2 of 2), by Dennis Danvers
Fiction.
Everybody's watching the same scenes: the fiery crash, the swelling tributaries of desperate people filling the huge parking lot, the surrounding neighborhoods and beyond, a sea of people as far as you can see, more and more all the time, looking to the sky, for what? For relief, for hope, for something impossible to believe in. For us.
Beanstalk, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
from afar it must look like / God's finger, / the one He used when He / stirred forth the world's flora / from the first mud.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Night and Day: the place of Equinox in Samuel R. Delany's Oeuvre
Tuesday: Aye, and Gomorrah, and other stories, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Wednesday: About Writing, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Thursday: Dark Reflections, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Strange Horizons Podcast: Interview with Maggie Hogarth, by Susan Marie Groppi
Editorial.
Strange Horizons editor Susan Marie Groppi talks with artist and writer Maggie Hogarth about distributed publishing models, the Amazon Kindle, and the author-audience relationship.

12/10/07

Digital Mythology, by Paul Squire
Art.
Whether I am creating images, music or web designs I find the journey to be one of inner illumination.
R3 (Part 1 of 2), by Dennis Danvers
Fiction.
Donner's a mess—grazing on the wrong shrooms again. She's let a little spider make a web in her antlers and won't let me touch it. "At least it's real," she says. "It is what it is. What are we? Freaks. Genetic meatloaf. Reindeer who can sing and dance."
Given to the Frost, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
Given to the frost our fragile cities / bright with banners, dance, & brilliant song / offered up in sunlight.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Jim Crace's The Pesthouse and Sarah Hall's The Carhullan Army, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle
Wednesday: Matt Ruff's Bad Monkeys, reviewed by Michael Levy
Friday: Joe Haldeman's The Accidental Time Machine, reviewed by Karen Burnham

12/3/07

The You Train, by N.K. Jemisin
Fiction.
I don't like being in there when it's that empty, sometimes it's not safe, but you know, a cab would've cost thirty dollars and I don't get paid 'til next week. But finally someone comes in, this woman, and she looks at me like I'm crazy and tells me the B doesn't run at night.
Flights of Fancy, by Ed Gavin
Poetry.
She expects fireworks upon arrival, / a spectacle put on just for her
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: KJ Parker's Engineer Trilogy, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Wednesday: Dan Simmons' The Terror, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Friday: Cherie Priest's Not Flesh Nor Feathers, reviewed by JC Runolfson

11/26/07

Revisiting the Canon with Susannah: Fairies, Aliens, and Nature Magic, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
My favorite Shakespeare comedy is As You Like It, because I have a weakness for the "transvestite comedies," in which girls dress up as boys and go out to seek their fortunes. Unfortunately, with the exception of a minor goddess descending to deliver a few rhymed couplets and celebrate a marriage, As You Like It features no actual magic. A Midsummer Night's Dream, though, is full of magic.
Airport Shoes, by Ursula Pflug
Fiction.
Airports are about coming and going; they are never about being anywhere, except perhaps the bar. I paid out a lot more cash to bartenders and ticket agents than I ever did on rent that summer.
Beyond the Clouds of Paradise, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
We see the chosen revelers / in their endless cosmic dance.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Battlestar Galactica: Razor, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Ekaterina Sedia's The Secret History of Moscow, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Friday: Richard K. Morgan's Thirteen/Black Man, reviewed by Sherryl Vint

11/19/07

Giving Up, by James Schellenberg
Column.
If you found the perfect work of art, wouldn't you want to find the sequel or season 2 and enjoy the heck out of it? And what if that follow-up was not up to the same level of quality ... would you give up?
Goat Eschatologies, by Margaret Ronald
Fiction.
The sign over the refrigerator had been knocked off-center. Pre-Apocalypse Sale on Cheese, it read in Gert's angular handwriting—a joke to start with, less and less funny every day. By now Gert was almost too ashamed to take it down.
She Needed To Get Out, by Ashley M. Nissler
Poetry.
She'd smudged my fresh-scrubbed wall. "Why so yellow?" / I asked. You never can tell with Charlotte.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Beowulf, reviewed by Roz Kaveney
Wednesday: Minsoo Kang's Of Tales and Enigmas, reviewed by Justin Howe
Friday: Tony Ballantyne's Divergence, reviewed by Duncan Lawie

11/12/07

Offerings of Otherness, by Susan Fraser
Art.
As well as being interested in the interactions between humans and the world around them, I am fascinated by both geometrical and free-form shapes, and colors and textures too.
Frankenstein's Microbe, by John Pettigrew
Article.
Natural selection is the process by which differences between similar organisms cause the organisms to have different degrees of success at living. One bacterial cell might be better at acquiring nutrients than another. When nutrients are limited, these variants would infer an advantage and hence increased possibility to survive and produce offspring.
Indie Boy Strikes!, by Iain Jackson
Column.
More than superhero comics: a look at a few favorite indie titles.
Ghosts and Simulations, by Ruthanna Emrys
Fiction.
"Don't call them dead in front of visitors, unless they say it first. Also, you keep an eye on the clients. They talk to each other. There's a monitor you can look at, I'll show you later. But they're stubborn. They don't change their minds much, so they get into loops sometimes."
The Night Boat, by Sonya Taaffe
Poetry.
Over the damp-blackened slates, the harbor / lights douse and sizzle in the sloping rain,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Laird Barron's The Imago Sequence, reviewed by William Mingin
Wednesday: The Best of Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet, reviewed by Michael Levy
Friday: Jon Courtenay Grimwood's 9 Tail Fox, reviewed by Alex Saltman

11/5/07

The Discerning Reader of Fantastic Literature's Guide to Literary Journals, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
I'm astounded at the quality and creativity in so many different magazines that don't get marketed to what seems to me a natural audience—readers who like their fiction to be at least a little bit odd, a little bit out of the ordinary.
Bears, by Leah Bobet
Fiction.
Ninety-eight percent of all fictional deaths are directly attributable to being eaten by bears.
Golem Americanus, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Strung up on our armatures of wood, it is we / who feign life every time the wind blows.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: David Marusek's Getting to Know You, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Susan Palwick's Shelter, reviewed by Richard Larson
Friday: Stephen Baxter's Navigator, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont

10/29/07

Am I Not a Nerd? (If You Prick Me, Do I Not Leak?), by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
What do I do for fun? I ride my bike! And play video games. But note that I ride my bike! I am not one of those lazy gamers!
Teinds, by Sonya Taaffe
Fiction.
In your basement studio, you drew blackout curtains against the afternoon and lit a branch of white candles in the sink, and under their rags of light I watched your face change from all the angles I could find. I could not make it change enough.
Post-Material Lotophagi, by Gene van Troyer
Poetry.
It's there on every page that links / into the junction of that throbbing dot. You are here.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Stephen King's Lisey's Story, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Tuesday: Ellen Kushner's The Privilege of the Sword, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Scott Lynch's The Lies of Locke Lamora, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle
Thursday: Catherynne M. Valente's In the Night Garden, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Friday: Gene Wolfe's Soldier of Sidon, reviewed by Tony Keen
Strange Horizons Podcast: Interview with Tim Pratt, by Susan Marie Groppi
Editorial.
Strange Horizons editor Susan Marie Groppi interviews Tim Pratt, who talks about books, babies, and what his fourteen-year-old self would have thought of his life today.

10/22/07

Conspiracies, Discoveries, and (Lack of) Coverups: A Cold War Science Tale, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
Oh boy, I thought to myself, a Roswell true believer. Here we go again.
One Paper Airplane Graffito Love Note, by Will McIntosh
Fiction.
I've heard a hundred legends accounting for the origin of the graffito confessions that have swept Chester, and met a dozen people who take credit for pioneering it. But all of them are wrong. I know who started it, and why.
The Native Finds Her in the Wreckage, by Marge Simon
Poetry.
but he breaks her fingers anyway, / stretches the bones to imitate his own,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Joanna Russ's The Country You Have Never Seen, reviewed by Sarah Monette
Tuesday: The Seeker: The Dark is Rising, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Wednesday: Peter F Hamilton's The Dreaming Void, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Thursday: Legends of the Fall: Television's newest SF shows, reviewed by K. Tempest Bradford

10/15/07

Making Payments, by Jason Stoddard
Fiction.
I imagined some young Comparative Value Analyst factoring that into her stellar rating for the Young Couples' Complex. But they didn't tell you they charged you anyway, even if you didn't drink the damn stuff. And they didn't tell you about the upsells.
Watching the Watchman, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
the rosettes open, blink, and take light.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Bryan Francis Slattery's Spaceman Blues, reviewed by Martin Lewis and Rose Fox
Wednesday: The Ultimates and The Ultimates 2, reviewed by Tony Keen
Friday: Ursula K. Le Guin's Powers, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein

10/8/07

Regis Moulun's Ways, by Regis Moulun
Art.
If the eclecticism of my illustrations is surprising, it is because my search for an aesthetic ideal helps to enrich and diversify my style. When I take my brushes to the fabric, I use vitality and depth to underline the paradoxes of the human drama.
Reading All Night, by James Schellenberg
Column.
At the time, I never questioned why I might be reading so many books. Books were awesome! That was about the sum of it.
The Master, by Lavie Tidhar
Fiction.
He was no longer fashionable, and had not, in fact, written or published a book for several years. The children, too, were now almost alien to him: they were a generation he had not anticipated.
Why We Left, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
The breath of chaos / Howled there like a solar wind / Too strong to ride, too wild to trust:
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Adam Roberts' Land of the Headless and Splinter, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle
Wednesday: Gary Alan Wassner's The Revenge of the Elves, reviewed by Brian Malone
Friday: Robin McKinley's Dragonhaven, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin

10/1/07

Medieval Mindsets: Narrative Theory and The Mists of Avalon, by Bridgette Da Silva
Article.
By giving the women characters a voice in her narrative, she humanizes them. In doing so, [Marion Zimmer Bradley] offers a counterstory to the oppressive Woman as Temptress master narrative.
Fixing Superman, by Iain Jackson
Column.
In fact, I'm not really talking about the Big Blue Boy Scout at all, really; I'm talking about superhero comics generally.
Catherine and the Satyr, by Theodora Goss
Fiction.
"Jack Byron is a devil," Grandmother Gight had told her, "and your life with him will be a hell. Are you ready to live in hell, my girl, for a red coat and the finest legs in Bath?"
Children of Breath, by Mary Alexandra Agner
Poetry.
There are no children of my blood / because I have failed under the eye / of history to make a family
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Trust Me, I'm A Fabulator: Three Books reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Two Views: Kelley Armstrong's No Humans Involved, reviewed by Genevieve Williams and Colin Harvey
Friday: Harry Turtledove's In At The Death, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy

9/24/07

Lost Dolls and Lost Dreams, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Herr Doktor Kafka offers Lizaveta the comfort of a story, saying that Belinda met a little boy who asked her to travel around the world with him, and so she has gone off to do so, but has promised to send postcards chronicling her adventures.
Minghun: Unlikely Patron Saints, No. 5, by Amy Sisson
Fiction.
"Beloved daughter, you died very young and did not experience the unity of marriage. Yang Xingwu and his wife have recently lost a son. They have asked for betrothal so your souls might meet."
The Wandering, by Rane Arroyo
Poetry.
We've been pushed into this lush / nothingness in the sky. Yes, I wore / a cloud as a crown while herded / onto my ship.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Anna Kavan's Ice and Guilty, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Paul McAuley's Cowboy Angels, reviewed by Michael J. Levy
Friday: Karen Miller's The Innocent Mage, reviewed by R. J. Burgess

9/17/07

Electric Sonnets: Celebrating the Old-School Point-and-Click, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
It's not just that I want to replay the games of my childhood, although the improved graphics and the addition of voices to storylines that I could almost recite do give me a little thrill—replaying my childhood in technicolor.
How the Little Rabbi Grew, by Eliot Fintushel
Fiction.
Rabbi Shlomo Beser was born with a caul, a shiny membrane that covered his head. It came to his maiden Aunt Dora that the child must have mystical capabilities, and she was right. At the age of two, Rabbi Shlomo recited all of the holy names of God as listed in the Book of Brilliance. He also recited several names that had never been written down.
The Wolf From the Door, by Sandra J. Lindow
Poetry.
Regular maintenance/takes longer now/and the nightly ritual/washings and lockings/consume me.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: It Happened Otherwise? Three Alternate Histories, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Stardust, reviewed by David J. Schwartz
Friday: Lois McMaster Bujold's The Sharing Knife: Legacy, reviewed by Donna Royston

9/10/07

Fantasy from Argentina, by Fernando Molinari
Art.
Fernando Molinari was born in Argentina on November 19, 1963. His entire life has been dedicated to illustration. Painting has become a way of exploring and expressing himself in several ways.
Revisiting the Canon with Susannah: Armored Ghosts Walk at Midnight!!!, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
But I never felt comfortable acknowledging to the rest of my class that my greatest thrill had come, while reading a passage a passage from Beowulf about how a great dragon ravaged the land, I suddenly said (and I think I actually said it aloud) "Oh my God! It's Smaug!"
In Stone, by Helen Keeble
Fiction.
It had been the only way to talk, after her voice had stopped. He'd carved his words into the rock, and her replies had come welling back, the stone weeping thin script of pure metals.
Antivenom, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Six long months of fever and vomit/later, he believes himself ready
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Ben Bova's Titan, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Justina Robson's Selling Out, reviewed by David Soyka
Friday: Kage Baker's The Sons of Heaven, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein
Strange Horizons Podcast: Interview with Mary Robinette Kowal, by Susan Marie Groppi
Editorial.
A new episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, featuring an interview with Mary Robinette Kowal.

9/3/07

Settings for Space Opera, Part III: Strange Neighbors, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
Every neighborhood has a few oddballs, right?
All Kinds of Reasons, by Katherine Maclaine
Fiction.
Tony skimmed the cursor over the image's direction arrows and made the baby spin. "Twelve months after birth. EEC Syndrome and sirenomelia, mostly. A couple of personality disorders too, according to the prediction software, but I think that's my fault."
Wereman, by Robert Frazier
Poetry.
a pup slipped backward toward the valley below / the gray didn't hesitate to leap in and push her free
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Best American Fantasy, reviewed by Gwyneth Jones
Wednesday: Polyphony 6, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Friday: Mike Carey's The Devil You Know and Vicious Circle, reviewed by Laura Blackwell

8/27/07

Summer Movies 2007, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Big budget spectacles? Yes. Movies worth watching again? Maybe. James surveys the science fiction and fantasy movies of summer 2007.
Practicing My Sad Face, by Marc Schultz
Fiction.
My recall is getting better as the doctors fine-tune my hippocampus. Now I can remember that Joyce is my girlfriend without looking her up in pMemory. I still don't recognize her face or voice, but those are separate problems.
Attracting the Attention of a Cat Who Disdains to Acknowledge Your Existence, by Susannah Mandel
Poetry.
I see I fill you with contempt./I cannot prove your feeling wrong.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: William Gibson's Spook Country, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Wednesday: Simon R. Green's The Man With the Golden Torc, reviewed by William Mingin
Friday: Steven Moffatt's Jekyll, reviewed by Colin Harvey
2007 Fund Drive: The Thrilling Conclusion!, by Susan Marie Groppi
Editorial.
Our fund drive was a success!

8/20/07

SF and Fantasy in the New Millennium: Women Publishing Short Fiction, by Susan U. Linville
Article.
To find out, I compiled a database of stories published in the Big Four from 1980 through 2001, identified gender for as many authors as I could, and examined trends.
SF and Fantasy in the New Millennium: An Update, by Susan U. Linville
Article.
As it has been five years since I collected data for the original article, I decided to reexamine the topic of women publishing short fiction by obtaining actual submission data.
Anyone for Blasphemy?, by Iain Jackson
Column.
If Superman stands there and proudly declares his devotion to one particular faith, a lot of readers might not be all that thrilled, and might stop reading—though if he proclaimed a belief in the Kryptonian gods, it probably wouldn't matter as much, since they're entirely fictional.
Little Ambushes, by Joanne Merriam
Fiction.
He twisted his fingers together as though emphasizing his alienness, every one of them looking like a slender thumb, and she thought his hands looked like a big, black spider wriggling at the end of its thread.
Bird Seed, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
The seeds immediately sprout acres of jays
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Paul G. Tremblay and Sean Wallace's Fantasy, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Scott Lynch's Red Seas Under Red Skies, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Friday: John Meaney's Bone Song, reviewed by Duncan Lawie

8/13/07

Twelve Adventures, by Kat Beyer
Art.
I come from a long line of artists, though I did not realize this until I noticed that an awful lot of the paintings, sculpture, and fiber art in my family's houses was made by my family.
Pol Pot's Fantasized Daughter, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
When I first encountered "Pol Pot's Beautiful Daughter (Fantasy)", I read a few pages and stopped. The idea of a story about Pol Pot written in what felt like the diction of a fairy tale was too much for me.
The Girl From Another World, by Leah Bobet
Fiction.
She snuggles up next to me. "Let me destroy your dark lords," she says. "Let me restore your kingdom. Let me avenge your sorrows and then I can go home."
The Painting Speaks, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
My voice recognition units/enable me to eavesdrop on your critique
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Transformers, reviewed by Tim Phipps and Tim Phipps
Wednesday: John Klima's Logorrhea, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Friday: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, reviewed by Catie Ash
Strange Horizons Podcast: Interview with Benjamin Rosenbaum, by Susan Marie Groppi
Editorial.
The Strange Horizons podcast is back and features an interview with author Benjamin Rosenbaum.

8/6/07

The Revolution Will Neither Be Televised Nor Built Into the Infrastructure of Virtual Worlds, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
So yeah, City of Heroes (and a lot of other games) could get a certain amount of mileage out of "Gay Gamers: We're not as bad as WoW" without doing very much at all.
Artifice and Intelligence, by Tim Pratt, illustration by Mack Sztaba
Fiction.
"I think I do not believe in ghosts. But if someone had asked me, three months ago, if I believed in spontaneously bootstrapping artificial intelligence, I would have said no to that as well. The world is an uncertain place."
The Quince Bedroom, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
She touched her round organic limb
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Doctor Who: Series Three, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Jack Dann's The Man Who Melted, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Friday: Eliot Fintushel's Breakfast with the Ones You Love, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

7/30/07

Settings for Space Opera, Part II: A Perplexing Plethora of Planets, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
The discovery of planets around other stars is now a routine occurrence.
Wake-Up Call, by Leslie Brown
Fiction.
Mom slept until I was ten, and then she woke three times that year.
Growing Days, by Tina Connolly
Poetry.
We only talk now on growing days
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Michael Chabon's The Yiddish Policemen's Union, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Tuesday: Helen Oyeyemi's The Opposite House, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Jonathan Strahan's The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year, Volume 1, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Thursday: David Anthony Durham's Acacia, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin

7/23/07

On SF and the Mainstream, or, Rapidly Changing Scenery, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
Crawling out from under my rock this year, I was eager to take a look at the current state of marketing to see if anything had changed.
Limits, by Donna Glee Williams
Fiction.
When little Cam let go of her hand and ran off to explore the world without her, she watched after him and waited. And Cam ran back to her with sparkling eyes, crying out "As far as the big rock! I went that far, Len!"
Transmutation, by Scott Pearson
Poetry.
Wanting to shed what bleeds
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Forrest Aguirre's Swans Over the Moon, reviewed by Colin Greenland
Tuesday: Jay Lake's Trial of Flowers and Mainspring, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Theodora Goss and Delia Sherman's Interfictions, reviewed by David Soyka
Thursday: Ellen Klages's Portable Childhoods, reviewed by Richard Larson

7/16/07

Lost Moments, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Sure, a fragmented experience might be annoying, but gaps might also be healthy—can all those Dr. Who episodes really be that good?
The Perfume Eater, by R. J. Astruc
Fiction.
I'm sure Johnny intends to bring the chair back upstairs at some point, but as the body-builder girlfriend spent the night, he hasn't had a chance yet. He'd have a hard time getting it away from the deev, anyway. Deev don't like being told by mere mortals to stand up and move.
Wings, by Andrea Blythe
Poetry.
peeling from his flesh, reaching up, tips pointed skyward.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Name of the Wind and The Children of Hurin, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Tuesday: Lionel Shriver's The Post-Birthday World, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle
Wednesday: Ted Chiang's The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate, reviewed by Bill Mingin
Thursday: Brian Aldiss's HARM, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy

7/9/07

From the South, by Zach McCain
Art.
Zach McCain is an internationally published artist whose work ranges from illustrations for books, magazines, and graphic novels, to artwork for trading cards, t-shirts, and CDs.
Lexx at Ten, by Nader Elhefnawy
Article.
All facetiousness about just who the show was intended for aside, the simple fact was that he "liked some science fiction a lot and hated most" of the rest. In particular, he'd more than had his fill of "do-gooders trying to save the universe in highly derivative plots."
The Captain Is the Last to Leave, by Caroline Lockwood Nelson
Fiction.
"Jessie hated having her picture taken," the girl tells him. He would like to tell her what a young girl she is for all of this, too young for ripped-out throats and missing women. He would like to squeeze her hand, but he stays on his side of the booth and watches the waves and the gray sky and he waits for her to quiet.
Animal Pharm, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
Dr. Moreau, with his uplifted / beasts, might be considered / the father of this line of research
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Elizabeth Hand's Generation Loss, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Tuesday: Ysabeau S. Wilce's Flora Segunda, reviewed by David V. Barrett
Wednesday: Frances Hardinge's Verdigris Deep, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Thursday: Scarlett Thomas's The End of Mr Y, reviewed by Dan Hartland

7/2/07

Brazos, by Jerome Stueart, illustration by Lydia C. Burris
Fiction.
We yapped for fifteen minutes about dry West Texas weather, like we were neighbors, except he had a gleam in his eye. I knew I would lose something.
Dark & Light, by David Lunde
Poetry.
Dark / is the natural state of things
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Solitudes, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Tuesday: Love & Sleep, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Wednesday: D�monomania, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Thursday: Endless Things, reviewed by John Clute

6/25/07

All Those Books, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
I could somehow find a few hundred boxes, put the books in them, load the boxes into a big truck, and drive the truck to my new home, where I would then pile the books up to the ceiling in each little room.
The Leaving Sweater, by Ruth Nestvold
Fiction.
Growing up in remote Rolynka, Alaska, in the middle of the last century, Victoria Askew never really learned the trick of how to leave.
Freebasing the Moon, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
Silver glitters in his cratered eyes
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Richard Labont� and Lawrence Schimel's The Future is Queer, reviewed by Rose Fox
Tuesday: Alastair Reynolds's The Prefect, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: Nalo Hopkinson's The New Moon's Arms, reviewed by J.C.Runolfson
Thursday: Mike Resnick's Alien Crimes, reviewed by Karen Burnham

6/18/07

Interview: Bruce Boston, by JoSelle Vanderhooft
Article.
"Mainstream poetry draws upon our consensual reality of the everyday world for its content and backdrop. Speculative poetry is drawn from the imagination, the world as it might be."
29 Union Leaders Can't Be Wrong, by Genevieve Valentine
Fiction.
He's not, though; no better and no worse. He looks like someone he would know. He touches his cheeks, runs his finger down the bridge of his new nose. When he cries Callahan stares at the cabinets until he's got hold of himself.
Gaia's Children, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
I am now half the monster I used / to be.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Patrick Rothfuss' The Name of the Wind, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Tuesday: Fran�ois Devenne's Three Dreams on Mount Meru, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Wednesday: Joe Abercrombie's Before They Are Hanged, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll
Thursday: Steven Brust's Dzur, reviewed by Genevieve Williams

6/11/07

Future Visions, by Peter Bartczak
Art.
I prefer an old world Renaissance look mixed in with a Norman Rockwell sensibility—it fits into my tweaked view of the universe— to make the strange normal and the normal strange, the small big and the big small.
Games vs. Toys, or the Value of the Hello Kitty Aesthetic, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
As someone who happily discarded her toaster prior to her latest cross-country move with the prospect of replacing it with the Hello Kitty version, and whose last bathroom had Hello Kitty wall borders, you can imagine how quickly I jumped on it.
Gift of Flight, by Nghi Vo
Fiction.
My mother's wedding dress was the skin of a swan, still blindingly white after more than a decade nestled in tissue paper. She would never let me try it on, no matter how hard I begged, or how my young arms ached to stretch into strong beating wings.
What Relativity Tells Us, by Jeff Jeppesen
Poetry.
There is no such thing as distance—
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 28 Weeks Later, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Tuesday: Eric Brown's Helix, reviewed by R.J. Burgess
Wednesday: Catherine Jinks's Evil Genius, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Thursday: Kelley Eskridge's Dangerous Space, reviewed by Ilana Teitlebaum

6/4/07

Dispatches from Planet France: Ch�teaux, Part II - The Architecture of Ghosts, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
Sometimes, looking down an empty stairwell or wiping chalk dust off a board as the light settled through the pointed windows, it seemed to me that I was sharing my space with some kind of heavy presence, compounded out of history, time, ideas, ghosts.
Private Detective Molly, by A. B. Goelman, illustration by Egypt Urnash
Fiction.
That's when I see my new boss. Four feet of trouble. Brunette variety. Tear tracks cutting through the dirt on her face, wearing jeans that were already old when Molly Dolls were nothing more than molded plastic and fantasy homes.
The Amateur Astronomer in Me, by Timothy Green
Poetry.
It's no wonder he spends / so much time alone
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Ken MacLeod's The Execution Channel, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Tuesday: Lucius Shepard's Softspoken, reviewed by Richard Larson
Wednesday: The Coyote Road: Trickster Tales, edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling, reviewed by J. C. Runolfson
Thursday: Andrew Butcher's The Time of the Reaper, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll

5/28/07

Interview: Eugie Foster, by Lynne Jamneck
Article.
It was always the monsters and magic which drew me, stuff that fires the imagination and leaves you wandering around in a cloud of "what if" and "ooo" for the rest of the day.
Indie Videogames: Artform in the Making?, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Ambitious people are busy attempting to make videogames into an artform. Will indie videogames bring this about? And does the term "indie" even make sense?
Ex Machina, by Margaret Ronald
Fiction.
"'And One said, I will choose among you certain of your folk, that they may know the lightning's path, and the mysteries of light, and the knowledge to heal that which was made and not born. For learning fails, and inscriptions weather away, and records molder, but the blood carries on.'"
Wish-stone at Dunnottar, by Neile Graham
Poetry.
Twice I have assailed these walls.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Margo Lanagan's Red Spikes, reviewed by Colin Greenland
Tuesday: David Devereux's Hunter's Moon, reviewed by Richard Larson
Wednesday: Paul McAuley's Players, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Thursday: Extended Play: the Elastic Book of Music, reviewed by Paul Raven

5/21/07

X-Ray Vision: Not Just for Superman Anymore?, by Corie Ralston
Article.
Superman's x-ray vision is not very realistic in the way it is presented in the movie and the comics, yet it's not very far from what is actually possible with x-rays.
Brownman (Part 2 of 2), by C. Scavella Burrell
Fiction.
There was nothing to breathe in that room but steam and smells. Suddenly I didn't want to be there, didn't know why I did whatever anyone told me.
The Cook and the Scullery Maid, by Mikal Trimm
Poetry.
Such a mess the Master makes with his plate—
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Guy Gavriel Kay's Ysabel, reviewed by Graham Sleight and Victoria Hoyle
Tuesday: Jed Mercurio's Ascent, reviewed by Michael Froggatt
Wednesday: Stephen Hunt's The Court of the Air, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Thursday: Tom Holt's Barking, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein

5/14/07

Myths, Legends and Faerie Folk, by Michael "Warble" Finucane
Art.
With a blend of geometric abstraction and an arcane medieval style application, Warble creates a fusion of innovative and original art for the 21st century.
Brownman (Part 1 of 2), by C. Scavella Burrell
Fiction.
"I've seen them," said Uncle. He'd had plenty of chance, delivering flower arrangements and stone slabs and people. "Wanting to follow. They can't, don't worry. The dead stay by their homes. They won't bother you in yours."
If Cold Is a War, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
If cold is a war, it was forced upon us
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Mistakes and all: Defending Battlestar Galactica, by Jeremy Adam Smith
Tuesday: China Mi�ville's Un Lun Dun, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Spider-Man 3, reviewed by Iain Clark
Thursday: Mary Rosenblum's Horizons, reviewed by Duncan Lawie

5/7/07

How to Write a Paragraph, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Vonnegut approached paragraphs the way good poets approach line and stanza breaks, and in that sense he was the Robert Creeley of prose, someone whose writing at its best seems perfect in its rhythm and shape
The Hide, by Liz Williams, illustration by Liz Clarke
Fiction.
The birds were white as they flew over the marsh, across the reedbeds and the frosted meres, but as they drew level with the hide their shade changed, from white to black. I saw their crimson eyes, sparks in the cloudy dark, as they disappeared into the storm.
The Bell Ringer's Wife, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
So maybe he's not the most handsome man
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Tricia Sullivan's Double Vision and Sound Mind, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Tuesday: Mat Coward's So Far, So Near, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: Jeffrey Thomas's Deadstock, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Thursday: Kage Baker's Rude Mechanicals, reviewed by Sherryl Vint

4/30/07

Return of the Son of Tetris, or Good Games Never Die, They Just Get Shiny New 3D Backgrounds and a Soundtrack by Freezepop1, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
Fella Down A Hole: Unlikely Patron Saints, No. 2, by Amy Sisson
Fiction.
The words mock me, 'cause every kid grows up in Pedy knows you don't walk around looking at the sky instead of the ground. That's the surest way to get yourself killed, out here where shafts mark the landscape like so many tunnels down to hell.
Flyboy, by Lucy A. Snyder
Poetry.
With a chemistry book in my hand, I could fly.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Ian McDonald's Brasyl, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Tuesday: One of these books is not like the others: three tomes about SF TV, reviewed by Tim Phipps
Wednesday: Minister Faust's From the Notebooks of Dr. Brain, reviewed by Karen Burnham

4/23/07

Offworlding Without Leaving Earth: Going on Location with Starship Troopers, by Brenta Blevins
Article.
Standing at an overlook, I stared at the canyon floor 180 feet below and was able to picture exactly where they'd filmed the first bug battle. I had to admire the Hollywood magic of making a relatively small area do such a wonderful job of suggesting, not just one, but two planetary ecospheres.
Ferryman's Reprieve, by Kate Bachus
Fiction.
"I killed a woman was dear to my heart. I knew it was a mistake when I done it."
Porch Lights, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
Milky traffic lights click on and off,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Rudyard Kipling's The Mark of the Beast and Other Fantastical Tales, reviewed by Bill Mingin
Tuesday: Sunshine, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Richard Morgan's Black Man/Thirteen, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Thursday: Michael Chabon's The Yiddish Policemen's Union, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein

4/16/07

From the Formative Years, by James Schellenberg
Column.
It's been enlightening and surprising, in almost equal measures, to revisit the books that formed my reading habits in my childhood.
How the Mermaid Lost Her Song, by Mark Teppo
Fiction.
"Fascinating," he murmured, staring into the squid's blank gaze. "Protector or devourer? I wonder." The squid shifted color again, draining to opaque white as if to give nothing away to the detective's question.
Armageddon: At the Clinic, by Marge Simon
Poetry.
Stella checks the food supplies.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Arthur C. Clarke Award shortlist, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Tuesday: The Solaris Book of New SF and Fast Forward 1, reviewed by David Soyka
Wednesday: CJ Cherryh's Deliverer, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll
Thursday: Robert Reed's Flavours of My Genius, reviewed by Colin Harvey

4/9/07

In Moebius's Shadow, by Nate Simpson
Art.
I've always felt slightly guilty about getting paid to do this sort of art—how could something so fun be worth actual money? Come to think of it, I need to remember to check the classifieds for professional tiramisu-tasting positions.
Dispatches from Planet France: Châteaux, Part I, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
There's a romantic glow about them—they tend to look like exquisite fairy-tale castles from the outside, and on the inside they are full of rooms and corridors and entire huge wings, high ceilings and places that you could lose your way in.
Painted, by Becca De La Rosa
Fiction.
Loretta waged war against the museum curators. They never saw her coming. She was the speck of dust tightrope-walking through the air, the rain left standing in pools by the entrance on rainy days.
Rehydration, by Tina Connolly
Poetry.
The ship is hot; it backfires / in the last row of corn, and there is popcorn in the night / which isn't supposed to happen
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Farah Mendlesohn's Glorifying Terrorism, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Tuesday: The Last Mimzy, reviewed by Bill Mingin
Wednesday: Primeval: The First Season, reviewed by Iain Clark

4/2/07

David Icke, the Reptilian Infiltration, and the Limits of Science Fiction, by James Trimarco
Article.
[Icke] literally urges his readers to check out works of science fiction in order to help them visualize reptilian infiltration.
Settings for Space Opera, Part I: Welcome to the Neighborhood, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
Whether you're looking to start an interstellar colony, found a galactic empire, or merely find a great location for your next tale of adventure in outer space, it pays to know what the neighborhood is like.
What the Thunder Said, by Lavie Tidhar, illustration by Robert E. Hobbs, Jr.
Fiction.
Certainty made his voice heavy, his Other whispering all the while in his ear, a warning Mr. Nine fought in vain to ignore. "It was no inyanga who did this to your friend. The boy's soul was taken by the storm."
The Whole Atom, by Lee Ballentine
Poetry.
grief wakes the nucleus / of the whole atom
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Jon Armstrong's Grey, reviewed by Richard Larson
Tuesday: Mike Allen's Mythic 2, reviewed by Donna Royston
Wednesday: Matthew Hughes' Majestrum, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll
Thursday: Shortlist Overview: the 2007 Philip K. Dick Award, reviewed by Nicholas Whyte

3/26/07

And the Mome Raths Outgrabe, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Thus, we know that women were not invisible to Bradbury when he wrote the introduction, only wives who wrote stories with their husbands.
Harvest, by Joanne Merriam
Fiction.
Soldiers surround the area and shout at the humans to please step out of the line of fire. A tank raises its turret and somebody is shouting something about surrendering and then the aliens just aren't there anymore.
An Atypical Reaction to the Death of the Sun and the Moon, by Mikal Trimm
Poetry.
a sliver of sunlight threatening the sky / so I don't have much time before / I lose the animal inside
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Cormac McCarthy's The Road, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle and Paul Kincaid
Tuesday: Tim Pratt's Hart & Boot & Other Stories, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Wednesday: Alastair Reynolds' Galactic North and Zima Blue, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Thursday: Alisa Libby's The Blood Confession, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin

3/19/07

The Doctor Who Novels of Ian Marter, by Nicholas Whyte
Article.
In this article, I examine the Doctor Who books of Ian Marter, who wrote more novelizations of broadcast stories than anyone except Terrance Dicks and, uniquely, came to the process not as a writer but as an actor.
The Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed with the Sun (Part 2 of 2), by Paula R. Stiles
Fiction.
"We're talking about respectable people, here, not honest or kind or honorable ones. They'll do whatever it takes to keep looking respectable."
This is the House, by Jaime Lee Moyer
Poetry.
This is the way Jack's eyes gleam / in a house where no one can see. / This is the way he shivers.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: M. Rickert's Map of Dreams, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Tuesday: Arkady & Boris Strugatsky's Roadside Picnic, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: Sean Wright's Jaarfindor Remade and Love under Jaarfindor Spires, reviewed by Colin Harvey

3/12/07

Innovari, by Luca Oleastri
Art.
In the last decade my creativity has leaned towards computer graphics and 3D illustrations in particular—with which I wanted to create professional artworks for books and magazines.
My Avatar, My Not-Self: Narrative Worlds Within Video Games, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
She embodies many of what you might call my personal aesthetic bullet-proof kinks: she is bright, she is pink, she is relatively small, and she has seriously aggressive hair.
The Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed with the Sun (Part 1 of 2), by Paula R. Stiles
Fiction.
"I found her in a disposal on Zero Level. I don't know if she's got kin or not, but if she does, I figure they'll be pretty worried about her. And if not, she'll need looking after."
Muse, by Sonya Taaffe
Poetry.
With ink I feathered you, at your fingertips sketched
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Jan Morris's Hav, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Tuesday: Cherie Priest's Dreadful Skin, reviewed by J.C. Runolfson
Wednesday: Carlos Fuentes's The Eagle's Throne, reviewed by R.J. Burgess
Thursday: Rob Grant's Fat, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll

3/5/07

Raindogs and Dustpuppets, by Chris Gauthier, illustration by Marge Simon
Fiction.
They had neither surface nor substance—they were little more than dog-shaped holes in the rain—but they behaved just like dogs.
We Will Not Go To Memphis, Then, by Jeff Jeppesen
Poetry.
We camp not far from the empty highway but no cars drive by.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Joe Hill's Heart-Shaped Box, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Tuesday: Mary Gentle's Ilario, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Contact, for the Nintendo DS, reviewed by Erin Hoffman

2/26/07

Board Game Renaissance, by James Schellenberg
Column.
If you thought the future was virtual reality, there's a strong subculture that's going in the opposite direction: board games.
Horatius and Clodia, by Charlie Anders
Fiction.
"If you're a foreign currency, you can't come in," I said. "I'm not set up to do forex yet."
Be True, by Mary Alexandra Agner
Poetry.
Your devotion to mathematics and the three laws / of robotics prohibit romance and biology.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Bruce Holland Rogers's The Keyhole Opera, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Tuesday: Stephen Baxter's Conqueror, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: Roger Levy's Icarus, reviewed by Pete Young
Thursday: Jonathan Barnes's The Somnambulist, reviewed by David Soyka

2/19/07

Megastructures, by Paul Lucas
Article.
However, if a civilization were to convert all of the material in the system to the job of supporting life, by creating the vast habitable surface area of, say, a ringworld or Dyson sphere, the problem could be circumvented.
Cloudy With a Chance of Star Formation, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
The densest parts of the interstellar medium remain far emptier than the best vacuums yet created in Earthly laboratories, and the gigantic scales over which the interstellar medium extends boggle the mind.
Foam on the Water, by Cat Rambo
Fiction.
I found my reaction to her unsettling. I've worked hard at eliminating reactions to women. Too much potential trouble. Too much potential scandal. Here in Thailand it wouldn't matter, perhaps. Back home it would.
Casting Her Lot, by Deborah P. Kolodji
Poetry.
Stranded from the outer galaxy, / she signs over her last ranch credits ...
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Thomas Pynchon's Against the Day, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Tuesday: Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: Ian Whates's Time Pieces, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Thursday: Bruce Boston's Shades Fantastic and Masque of Dreams, reviewed by JoSelle Vanderhooft

2/12/07

Dreams to Reality, by Ione Citrin
Art.
Her contemporary paintings and sculptures range from abstract to realistic to impressionistic - all visionary interpretations from her imaginative soul.
Dead. Nude. Girls., by Lori Selke
Fiction.
Her nipples are blue, too. He wants to touch them, take them in his mouth, to see if they, too, are cold. To see if he can warm them. But he isn't allowed to move his hands.
Jumping into the System, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
We're fomenting revolutions on alien planets,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The James Tiptree Award Anthology 3: Subversive Stories about Sex and Gender, edited by Karen Joy Fowler, Pat Murphy, Debbie Notkin, and Jeffrey D. Smith, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle
Tuesday: Charles Stross's The Jennifer Morgue, reviewed by Mark Teppo

2/5/07

Tradition, by Joey Comeau
Fiction.
There are some words that connect with that secret part of you, and it feels as though you're opening up in slow motion like a flower on TV when you say them all by yourself. Last night, after I heard my mother say "atheist", I felt a bit of that strangeness. But standing in front of my mirror, I felt nothing.
Now We Must Speak in the Shadows of Silence, by Kendall Evans
Poetry.
the intermittent chant / of lunar eclipses
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Arthur C Clarke Award: A Critical Anthology, reviewed by Claire Brialey
Tuesday: Harry Turtledove's Settling Accounts: The Grapple, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Wednesday: David Langford's The End of Harry Potter, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Thursday: Rudy Rucker's Mathematicians in Love, reviewed by Yoon Ha Lee

1/29/07

Interview: Steve Berman, by Eugie Foster
Article.
"I'd say that more of my experiences make their way into my stories than elements of my personality. Not that I live such an exciting lifestyle, trust me, but tiny things do add an air of verisimilitude. Like when I stumbled onto a gay club in Mongolia while I was pretending to be straight."
The (Anti)Social "Casual" Gamer, or the Game Is Not the Thing, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
It seems to me that the main way in which games differ is this: are they played alone, or with others either physically or virtually co-present?
Three Days and Nights in Lord Darkdrake's Hall, by Leah Bobet
Fiction.
"No," he said softly. "I know who you are. The lieutenant's girl. The only woman Stoneburn's ever allowed in his Company. They'll come. And they'll die."
Crash, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
he managed to evade conscription
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Alfonso Cuaron's Children of Men, reviewed by William Mingin
Tuesday: Peter S. Beagle's The Line Between, reviewed by Justin Howe
Wednesday: Elizabeth Moon's The Serrano Legacy, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Thursday: Robert A. Heinlein and Spider Robinson's Variable Star, reviewed by Nicholas Whyte

1/22/07

Dispatches from Planet France: A Cheese Map of France, Part III, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
No matter how many times I look at it, it keeps reversing my expectations. It does not show bordering countries, it does not show river networks, and, strangest to my mind, it does not even show cities. Paris is not on the cheese map. I am not sure I have ever before seen a map of France that did not show Paris. Have you?
Somewhere in Central Queensland, by Grace Dugan
Fiction.
They were the ones sheltering the dissidents who fled from the cities, and accepting the refugees who still continued to come from the north, when the government would have left them to starve.
The War on Terror, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
insecurity was our only security
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: A Thousand Words About Heroes, by Roz Kaveney
Tuesday: David Herter's On The Overgrown Path, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Wednesday: Jack McDevitt's Odyssey, reviewed by Karen Burnham
Thursday: Guillermo del Toro's El Laberinto del Fauno (a.k.a. Pan's Labyrinth), reviewed by David J. Schwartz

1/15/07

Some Breakthroughs Please!, by James Schellenberg
Column.
All that said, I guess I'm like those nerds who read the cautionary tale of Neuromancer and decided that the dystopia described by that book was a good idea.
Godtouched, by Sara Genge
Fiction.
She knows so many things she shouldn't. It's the hum, the godtouch that has told her all of this. Sometimes she knows if someone is alive or dead, sometimes she can tell if the clans will raid their dirty village. Most of the time she doesn't understand what she hears.
The Observatory, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
Now the observatory stores firewood
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Doctor Who, "The Runaway Bride", reviewed by Nicholas Whyte and Tony Keen
Tuesday: George R. R. Martin's Dreamsongs, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Wednesday: L. Timmel Duchamp's Talking Back: Epistolary Fantasies, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Thursday: Sound and Fury: The Sputtering Candle of Battlestar Galactica, by Dan Hartland

1/8/07

Beauties and Creatures, by Yifat Shaik
Art.
Drawn to fantasy (and fairies especially) since an early age, her art is inspired by the works of Brian Froud and Alan Lee, as well as by comic books and manga.
Lurking in the Dark, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
If we must anthropomorphize our neighborhood icy bodies (and I'm not recommending that we do), far better to celebrate lucky Pluto, a family man (with three bouncing baby moons, two newly discovered in the last year), and a home in a very popular part of town.
Before Paphos, by Loretta Casteen
Fiction.
It starts again. The baby begins to cough and choke.
Dead Light, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
As it happened, the star she wished on burned
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: John Clute's The Darkening Garden, reviewed by Sarah Monette
Tuesday: H.G. Wells's Star Begotten, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Gwyneth Jones's Rainbow Bridge, reviewed by Sherryl Vint
Thursday: Torchwood: "Captain Jack Harkness" and "End of Days", reviewed by Iain Clark

1/1/07

Flight of the Useful Books, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Some people who know me might assume the sorts of books I would find engrossing for a plane ride would be things like the complete works of Proust, or at least Faulkner.
Locked Doors, by Stephanie Burgis
Fiction.
You can never let anyone suspect, his mother told him. That was the first rule she taught him, and the last, before she left him here alone with It.
Noplace Like Home, by Elizabeth Barrette
Poetry.
And the strange moon hanging overhead / Is every shade from palest chrysoprase / Through emerald to almost black
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 2006 In Review, by Our Reviewers
Tuesday: Stephen Baxter's Resplendent, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Wednesday: Robert Charles Wilson's Julian, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Thursday: Allen Ashley's Urban Fantastic, reviewed by Jeremy Adam Smith

12/18/06

"Do No Harm to Me or Mine": The Haunted History of Christmas Eve, by Marian Kensler
Article.
The attempts to Christianize Yule and Saturnalia were not entirely effective. Instead of becoming gradually transformed into wholly Christian holidays, as Gregory the Great had hoped, many of the old traditions continued unabated, particularly in more remote regions.
Heroic Measures, by Matthew Johnson
Fiction.
Pale as he was, it was hard to believe he would never rise from this bed. Even in the darkest times, she had never really feared for him; he had always been strong, so strong.
A Compass for the Mutant Rain Forest, by Bruce Boston and Robert Frazier
Poetry.
Travelers who venture this trek witness / these mutations and are soon transfixed.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling's Salon Fantastique, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Tuesday: Paul Auster's Travels in the Scriptorium, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Alexander C. Irvine's Pictures From An Expedition, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Thursday: Don't Stop: A West Wing retrospective by Graham Sleight

12/11/06

The Art of Darkness, by Bob Hobbs
Art.
Bob Hobbs was born and raised up and down the east coast, the eldest of five in a Navy family. His talent in art was noticed early on while he was still in the second grade and continued through to his graduation from high school.
Interview: M. Rickert, by John Joseph Adams
Article.
"I started to distinguish between the feeling I had when I was writing someone else's truth, and when I was writing my own. I began to trust that feeling, though it is still very odd to me that my writing voice can be quite dark."
Love Among the Talus, by Elizabeth Bear
Fiction.
Nilufer raised her eyes to his. It was not what women did to men, but she was a princess, and he was only a bandit. "I want to be a Witch," she said. "A Witch and not a Queen. I wish to be not loved, but wise. Tell your bandit lord, if he can give me that, I might accept his gift."
The Robot-Emperor's Concubine, by Elizabeth Barrette
Poetry.
Some nights, after he leaves, / She sits on the windowsill / Staring into the night,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Pete Crowther's Forbidden Planets, reviewed by Mark Rich
Tuesday: Ray Bradbury's Farewell Summer, reviewed by David Soyka
Wednesday: Joon-ho Bong's The Host, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Thursday: John Meaney's To Hold Infinity, reviewed by Colin Harvey

12/4/06

cityCityCITY: Jack Kerouac's Science Fiction, by Stuart Cormie
Article.
Ultimately, cityCityCITY serves to emphasize Kerouac's oft-expressed view of his own society as a rampant machine, driven by a military-industrial complex, in which people exist merely to power the machine in return for the consumption of its output.
Dispatches from Planet France: A Cheese Map of France, Part II, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
It was not until that evening, when I took the Gouda out of the refrigerator to prepare the evening meal, that I noticed that the butcher paper wrapped around it was printed with an image, green on white. I opened it out and studied it. It was a map of France.
Isolde, Shea, and the Donkey Brea, by Ursula Pflug, illustration by Timothy Lantz
Fiction.
If I went on without Shea, the donkey and I would have more to eat. But I didn't think I could. If I told Shea what I'd done maybe she wouldn't judge me. Maybe she'd stay instead.
Bluebeard's Third Wife, by Helena Bell
Poetry.
I am the answer in Trivial Pursuit, / the first interesting prime,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: M. John Harrison's Nova Swing, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Tuesday: Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn: The Final Empire, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll
Wednesday: Paul Haines's Doorways for the Dispossessed, reviewed by R.J. Burgess

11/27/06

Reading Fantasy Again, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Back when I was a kid, I read mostly fantasy. Then either I got jaded or the genre ran out of interesting things to say. Now it seems like fantasy is back!
Magnificent Pigs, by Cat Rambo
Fiction.
When I first took her to the hospital, they diagnosed it as Crohn's disease. Six months later, after I'd learned the vocabulary of aminosalicylates and corticosteroids and immunomodulators, they switched to a simpler word: cancer.
Kitchen Carcharodon, by Robert Borski
Poetry.
 . . . it waits to strike down / the unwary, / the unsuspecting innocent
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Prestige: the film and the screenplay, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Tuesday: Catherynne M. Valente's The Grass-Cutting Sword and In The Night Garden, reviewed by Donna Royston
Wednesday: Joe Lansdale's Mad Dog Summer, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Thursday: Tamara Siler Jones's Valley of the Soul, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont

11/20/06

Interview: Julie Phillips, by Matthew Cheney
Article.
The periods that got more emphasis were the ones for which I had more material. It worked backward from the way you might expect: if I had really interesting or revealing letters or journal entries for a particular period, then I wrote a chapter around them.
Smoke & Mirrors, by Amanda Downum
Fiction.
Brother Ezra, Madame Aurora, Luna and Sol the acrobats—familiar names, and a few she didn't know. She wondered if Jack still had the parrots and that cantankerous monkey. The show was here until the end of the month . . .
Iphigenia in Shaker Heights, by Mary A. Turzillo
Poetry.
Daddy kisses me, hands me onto the skiff, / going home to explain it all to Mom, he says.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Susanna Clarke's The Ladies of Grace Adieu, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle
Tuesday: David A. Sutton's Clinically Dead, reviewed by Kelly Christopher Shaw
Wednesday: Judy Allen's Unexplained, reviewed by Matt Cardin
Thursday: Gary Fry's The Impelled, reviewed by Colin Harvey

11/13/06

Doppelgangers of the Mind's Eye, by Christina Cartwright
Art.
I originally became interested in web design, which is what I went to school for, but after taking some art classes I found a new passion.
Building a Better Beanstalk, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
Imagine being able to fly a hundred times more space missions for the same budget we have today, or being able to easily build orbiting structures that dwarf the International Space Station.
Body, Remember, by E. Catherine Tobler
Fiction.
I will not walk into the ocean today. It is more plea than pledge; I silently repeat the words and pray they become truth.
Sleeping Beauty, by Mary Alexandra Agner
Poetry.
Poor planning lets fate devour the happy story here-and-now.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Karen Traviss's Matriarch, reviewed by Sherryl Vint
Tuesday: Jim Younger's High John the Conqueror, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: Philip Jose Farmer's Pearls From Peoria, reviewed by Danny Adams
Thursday: Keith Donohue's The Stolen Child, reviewed by R.J. Burgess

11/6/06

The Absence of Animals, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
While watching an episode of the new Battlestar Galactica, a television show I've recently become addicted to, my mind wandered to an idle thought: Where, I wondered, are the animals?
Pockmarked Cement, by Kaolin Fire, illustration by Thomas Dodd
Fiction.
Dharma Shankar, Ph.D., is in his field, juggling ears of corn while the locusts approach.
Sympathy, by Lucy A. Snyder
Poetry.
Sympathy evolved peripherally
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Julie Phillips' James Tiptree, Jr: The Double Life of Alice Sheldon, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Tuesday: The James Tiptree Award Anthology 1, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle
Wednesday: The James Tiptree Award Anthology 2, reviewed by Victoria Hoyle
Thursday: James Tiptree, Jr's Her Smoke Rose Up Forever, reviewed by Adam Roberts

10/30/06

Taming the Beast—or Not: Night Journeys with Weyland and Hannibal, by Margaret L. Carter
Article.
Lecter, on the other hand, is one of the human monsters against whom the vampire [Weyland] is judged. In playing Beauty to Lecter's Beast, Clarice becomes complicit in his crimes.
Dispatches from Planet France: A Cheese Map, Part I, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
The Carrefour occupies the entire western end of the mall, with groceries sold on the ground floor and household goods upstairs, and huge inclined moving walkways that carry shoppers between the floors with their carts. To cover ground more efficiently, store assistants zip around on Rollerblades.
Dead Man's Holiday, by Nicholas Seeley
Fiction.
Coming back from the dead is like black nail polish or rubber bracelets: it's not so cool when everyone's doing it.
Blood Moon Sestina, by Jennifer Hudock
Poetry.
What crushes underfoot like old bones?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Justine Larbalestier's Daughters of Earth, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Tuesday: Max Brooks's World War Z (audio book), reviewed by Siobhan Carrol
Wednesday: Jericho, reviewed by Alasdair Stuart
Thursday: Ursula K. Le Guin's Voices, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein

10/23/06

Real Girls Don't: The invisible minority of female video game players, by E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman
Column.
The cultural message is sometimes wrapped in hand-wringing and good intentions, but the underlying assumption beneath "Why don't girls play video games?" is still "Girls don't play video games."
High Windows, by Lavie Tidhar
Fiction.
The collar closed around my neck as the Ibn Al-Farid began its gentle acceleration towards the Jupiter system.
Moon Mirror, by Duane & Cathy Ackerson
Poetry.
she can't take her eyes off herself.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Jo Walton's Farthing, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Tuesday: Carolyn Ives Gilman's Candle in a Bottle, reviewed by Colin Harvey

10/16/06

Interview: Chuck Palahniuk, by Jeff Sartain
Article.
"A horror novel, as a social convention, is allowed to end in a dark way and to go to much darker places. It's sort of like labeling it right from the get go: 'This is not going to end well.'"
Winnowing the Herd, by Carrie Vaughn
Fiction.
I hoped my sigh wasn't too audible. For lack of anything that might have bled before being cooked, the only things that smelled edible were my co-workers.
Beach Climbing, by Elizabeth Barrette
Poetry.
Gills becoming lungs
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Charles Stross's Glasshouse, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Tuesday: Horton, Hartwell, Cramer, Strahan, Datlow, Link & Grant: The Year's Best Fantasy, reviewed by Nic Clarke
Wednesday: Kage Baker's The Machine's Child, reviewed by Lisa Goldstein

10/9/06

Future Ancestors, by Raul Cruz
Art.
Raul's artwork, inspired by Aztec and Mayan art, mixes traditional elements with science fiction and fantastic themes.
Everyone's Dilemma, by James Schellenberg
Column.
What should we have for dinner? That's the question that opens Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma... and the answer has become surprisingly complicated.
Spinning Out (Part 2 of 2), by Jamie Barras, illustration by Carole Hall
Fiction.
In ages past, on other earths, Pateelhogol's people, the Telorim, had controlled a great empire built on fabulous devices like the weather wheels. But they had warred amongst themselves. Their empire had fallen.
Telling, by M. Frost
Poetry.
soldiers of your enemy wait / stroking the flanks of their guns.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: La Science Des Rêves (a.k.a The Science of Sleep), reviewed by David J. Schwartz
Tuesday: Alan Campbell's Scar Night and Jay Amory's The Fledgling of Az Gabrielson, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Wednesday: Ellen Kushner's The Privilege of the Sword, reviewed by Yoon Ha Lee

10/2/06

Secondary in Character, but First in Our Hearts, by Adrian Simmons
Article.
The fact is, most of us are not "main character" material.
The Crimson Desert, by Marshall Perrin
Column.
The first footprints on Mars will come no earlier than 2025, or more likely 2035. By that time, though, will there be many Martian mysteries left?
Spinning Out (Part 1 of 2), by Jamie Barras, illustration by Carole Hall
Fiction.
As night fell, Cap'n Macintyre gathered the crew on the quarterdeck for a council of war. "Well, lads," he said, "what's it to be: keep running or turn and fight?"
Full Fathom Five, by Leah Bobet
Poetry.
Full fathom five you sing the change / into something rich and strange
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Glen Hirshberg's American Morons, reviewed by William Mingin
Tuesday: Terry Pratchett's Wintersmith, reviewed by Juliana Froggatt
Wednesday: Simon Haynes's Hal Spacejock series, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Thursday: Laurell K. Hamilton's Strange Candy, reviewed by Elizabeth Barrette

9/25/06

The Solitary Quest: The Hero's Search for Identity in Roger Zelazny's Amber, by Lyn Gardner
Article.
[T]he momentum and unity of the series arise not from Corwin's shifting outward goals—grand gestures that progress from escaping a sanitarium to claiming a throne and repairing the Pattern that is the basis for all reality—but from the continuity of Corwin's metaphoric quest for identity.
The Length of the Sentence, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
I am a lover of long sentences, of sentences that wind their way through various clauses and complements...
Mayfly, by Heather Lindsley
Fiction.
I'm talking about flexing my infant fingers with the memory of arthritis in my grandmother's hands. I'm talking about reading before teething. I'm talking about taking my first clumsy steps toward an electric bill I already know is due next Thursday.
Spiral Scream, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
Was this what you heard, Edvard Munch, / in that moment / when vision shrieked like a mad sunflower
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: David Moles and Susan Marie Groppi's Twenty Epics, reviewed by Rose Fox
Tuesday: Frank Schatzing's The Swarm, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: Mark Chadbourn's Jack of Ravens, reviewed by Donna Royston
Thursday: Lisa Tuttle's The Silver Bough, reviewed by Genevieve Williams

9/18/06

John Clute: Yakfests of the Empyrean, by Matthew Davis
Article.
The idea that the world can be read as a Story makes the act of criticism redemptive; it can return usto the wellspring of innocent and powerful creativity....
Sounding, by Elizabeth Bear
Fiction.
Pen keeps her own counsel about who the worthy one is. She works nights at Nantucket Cottage Hospital. That gives them another little boost. Just enough, maybe, to stay afloat. So far.
A Rebel's Pale Eyes . . ., by Robert Frazier
Poetry.
Seem to haunt this icy REM fugue of mine / The pixilated arcs of a black box imagery
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Clifford D. Taylor's Skinks: A Pet Store Odyssey, reviewed by Tim Phipps
Tuesday: John Scalzi's Old Man's War and The Ghost Brigades, reviewed by Justin Howe
Wednesday: Edward J. McFadden III and E. Sedia's Jigsaw Nation, reviewed by Mark Teppo
Thursday: Theodora Goss's In the Forest of Forgetting, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum

9/11/06

A Magpie's Hoard, by Maral Agnerian
Art.
I simply find the human form beautiful, especially the female, and I love lush textures, rich colours, and fine details, so I try to impart all those things into everything I create.
Reading the Rhysling: 1981, by Greg Beatty
Article.
1981 saw two poems awarded the Rhysling, poems at the opposite end of the speculative poetry spectrum, or better, at opposite ends of several speculative poetry spectrums: length, accessibility, and most notably attitude and relation to the genre.
Fairest, by Brian Attebery
Fiction.
It was the cloth itself that darkened, from milk white to a shade like the foam below the millpond. Her Highness straightened up and brushed her hair back, and in the mirror Abel saw the brightness that had passed from the cloth, now lighting and lightening her face.
Helen Says . . ., by Chris Szego
Poetry.
. . . much is passed on, you see. Oh, not the / surface—the face is due to my mother's mother
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Dozois, Horton, Strahan, Hartwell & Cramer: The Year's Best SF, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Tuesday: Lucy Sussex's Absolute Uncertainty, reviewed by James Trimarco
Wednesday: Lucius Shepard's Life During Wartime, reviewed by R.J. Burgess
Thursday: John Burdett's Bangkok Tattoo, reviewed by Jason Erik Lundberg

9/4/06

Fusion Future, by Paul Lucas
Article.
Researchers have been promising the "fusion breakthrough" for over half a century now. The reality of fusion power may not be as rosy as some would like to paint.
The House Beyond Your Sky, by Benjamin Rosenbaum, illustration by Vladimir Vitkovsky
Fiction.
Among the ontotropes, transverse to the space we know, Matthias is making something new.
The Last Alchemist, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
when even the quarks / Charm and Strange rise / to a balanced breakfast,
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Polyphony 5, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Tuesday: Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: ParaSpheres, reviewed by Darja Malcolm-Clarke
Thursday: The Vintage Book of Amnesia, reviewed by Graham Sleight

8/28/06

Interview: Mark Budz, by Tristan Davenport
Article.
Today everything is symbolic, and this symbolic world is the real world. This pseudoself is the real self.
Bureaucrats in Space, by James Schellenberg
Column.
The future and a present filled with dark magic meet in the theme of the bureaucrat, courtesy of Swanwick and Stross.
The Town on Blighted Sea (Part 2 of 2), by A. M. Dellamonica
Fiction.
"They tossed away a million of their fry." Bitterness clawed her lungs; it was always a mistake, discussing this with kids. The words coughed out in spurts, like blood.
After the Last Spaceship, by Deborah P. Kolodji
Poetry.
A dying world's value / borne in a shoulder sack
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Mark Budz's Idolon, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Tuesday: Tamar Yellin's Kafka in Bronteland and Other Stories, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Etgar Keret's The Bus Driver Who Wanted To Be God and Other Stories, reviewed by R. J. Burgess
Thursday: Superman Returns, reviewed by Mahesh Raj Mohan

8/21/06

The Town on Blighted Sea (Part 1 of 2), by A. M. Dellamonica
Fiction.
She took in everything at once. The blood, the corpses—one human and female, one squid and male—the smell of puke and, most important, the lack of an immediate threat.
Elementary Students Explore the Universe, by Helena Bell
Poetry.
these kids will in one week / discover the unifying theory of physics.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Marvel's Civil War, issues 1-3, reviewed by Jeremy Adam Smith
Tuesday: Amanda Hemingway's The Sword of Straw, reviewed by Rose Fox
Wednesday: Nini Kiriki Hoffman's Catalyst, reviewed by Duncan Lawie
Thursday: M. Night Shyamalan's The Lady in the Water, reviewed by William Mingin

8/14/06

Gallery, by Chris O'Connell
Art.
His professional work has come to include graphics development, photomanipulation, web design, and even video game development, with clientele in fields ranging from academia to small press literature to independent film.
Interview: Naomi Novik, by Rose Fox
Article.
I wanted Europe to be fairly recognizable, partly to take advantage of the fact that that's kind of the most familiar setting to my readers—Regency and Napoleonic Era England is something that a lot of readers have a lot of familiarity with from literature....
Loving Words, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Some you love for superficial reasons, for their shape and color, for the texture of their pages and the scent of their history.
Flotsam, by Amanda Downum
Fiction.
Rebecca smiles back, but her stomach's sour again. Hundreds of red-haired girls in Ireland, no doubt, hundreds of children who think they see faeries. She drags deep on the cigarette, trying to settle her stomach. No reason to think it's her girl, her faerie.
To Her Mother, by Leah Bobet
Poetry.
I didn't want to let you down
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Naomi Novik's Throne of Jade and Black Powder War, reviewed by Rose Fox
Tuesday: Andreas Eschbach's The Carpet Makers, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Wednesday: Joe Abercrombie'sThe Blade Itself, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll
Thursday: Kage Baker's Mendoza in Hollywood, reviewed by Sherryl Vint

8/7/06

Draco Campestris, by Sarah Monette, illustration by Mack Sztaba
Fiction.
They were once a prized exhibit, but after the great taxonomic scandal under the previous Director, they became an embarrassment rather than a glory, banished to a cavernous hall in the sublevels of the Museum.
Home at Last, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
remembering when / they kept her / in the sea
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Doctor Who and the Nostalgia Factor: "School Reunion," reviewed by Iain Clark
Tuesday: Happy Times and Places: "Love and Monsters," reviewed by Tim Phipps
Wednesday: Six comments on "Army of Ghosts"/"Doomsday," by Abigail Nussbaum
Thursday: The Big Picture Show: Who S2, reviewed by Graham Sleight

7/31/06

That Fairy-Tale Feel: A Folkloric Approach to Meredith Ann Pierce's The Darkangel, by Marie Brennan
Article.
The Darkangel evokes more than one genre, including the gothic and (in certain places) science fiction, so what quality are we pointing to when we say it echoes the feel of a fairy tale?
The Women of Our Occupation, by Kameron Hurley
Fiction.
They were from a far shore none of us had ever seen or heard of, and every night my father cursed them as he turned on the radio. He kept it set to the resistance channel. No one wanted the women here.
Giving Back the Moon, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
I left all the other moons in place.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Alan DeNiro's Skinny-Dipping in the Lake of the Dead, reviewed by Adam Roberts
Tuesday: Chris Roberson's Paragea, reviewed by Mark Teppo
Wednesday: Paul Levinson's The Plot to Save Socrates, reviewed by Colin Harvey

7/24/06

Interview: Lyda Morehouse, by Lynne Jamneck
Article.
[...] SF writers and readers have a certain amount of luxury to get angry about their genre. All we have to do is point to our amazing subversive history and say, "You know, that book/short story was groundbreaking. Where's our next big mind-expanding/consciousness-raising work?"
Dispatches from Planet France: The Ontology of a Rock Star, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
Except that Johnny Hallyday is a rock star in France, and, somehow, that turns out to make all the difference.
Minty Bags a Squidboy, by Michael Hulme
Fiction.
On quiet nights, they say, you can hear the wood creak and groan under the weight of all the many, many squid people. The squid people sing their songs to the sea, songs in slow, mournful, painful bellows. The sea doesn't want them, and the city doesn't want them either.
Trepanation, by Lucy A. Snyder
Poetry.
Headcutting is old as woodcutting
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, reviewed by Jasmine Johnston
Tuesday: Ray Bradbury's Something Wicked This Way Comes, reviewed by R. J. Burgess
Wednesday: Lois McMaster Bujold's The Sharing Knife: Beguilement, reviewed by Greg Beatty
Thursday: Flatland, Flatterland, Spaceland: an education in three books, by Lori Ann White

7/17/06

Cartoons: Nostalgia and Nowadays, by James Schellenberg
Column.
If you want an instant blast of nostalgia, just think back to cartoons from childhood. And: any good cartoons out there now?
Silent Blade, by Leah Cypess
Fiction.
Danis woke up in the middle of the night and lay with her heart pounding, trying to convince herself she had only imagined the sound that had woken her. She had waited for that sound for five years, prepared for it day after day, dreamed of it night after night.
Field Notes, by Bette Lynch Husted
Poetry.
They have imagined something they call time.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Adam Roberts's Palgrave History of Science Fiction, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Tuesday: Justina Robson's Keeping It Real, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Wednesday: Stephen Baxter's Emperor, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Thursday: Half-Life 2: Episode One for PC, reviewed by Erin Hoffman

7/10/06

Green Glass Table, by Nathan and Noah Rice
Art.
Here in our studies of symbols, stories and tragedies, we excavate a personal web of embedded connections.
The Reader and the Map, by Johan Jönsson
Article.
How is a fantasy book with a map regarded, and what impression does the map give before the story has had a chance to tell us what it wants to say?
The Welsh Squadron (Part 2 of 2), by Margaret Ronald, illustration by Ian Simmons
Fiction.
"Tournaments. Tournaments and idiots searching for Christ relics and fighting on horseback. No blood. Nothing about watching your own men die. Relics don't change that. Nothing changes that."
Mirror Man, by Cathy & Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
Deciding on a mirror as the perfect camouflage, / he drinks the liquid coating destined for one.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Brian Stableford's Streaking, reviewed by John Clute
Tuesday: Zoran �ivković's Impossible Stories, reviewed by Nicholas Whyte
Wednesday: John Burdett's Bangkok 8, reviewed by Jason Erik Lundberg
Thursday: Stephen King's The Colorado Kid, reviewed by Bill Mingin

7/3/06

The Welsh Squadron (Part 1 of 2), by Margaret Ronald, illustration by Ian Simmons
Fiction.
"Hitler's sent them to London. We should expect to scramble in a half-hour at most." He paused, then added, "There's a lot of them."
The Bather, by Joanne Merriam
Poetry.
but beautiful as the daze of nature's chlorophyll dynamos
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Nintendo Recent Release Roundup: Fresh Faces on Old Favorites in the Palm of Your Hand, reviewed by Erin Hoffman
Tuesday: Steve Cockayne's The Good People, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Wednesday: Jon Courtenay Grimwood's End of the World Blues, reviewed by David Soyka
Thursday: Mythic, edited by Mike Allen, reviewed by Donna Royston

6/26/06

Interview: Selina Rosen, by Kenneth Mark Hoover
Article.
"We publish real complete stories...you won't find a bunch of atmospheric crap wrapped in a layer of angst that leaves you asking what the hell happened when you close one of our books."
Waiting on Alexandre Dumas, by William Davis
Fiction.
At the hostess stand, Jan was smiling and flapping her hand like a spastic penguin. Before her was a huge black-and-white black man. I mean, he was black, racially, but he seemed to be colorless, like an old black-and-white movie.
lis pendens, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
I filed suit for your soul today.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Scott Lynch's The Lies of Locke Lamora, reviewed by C.M. Morrison
Tuesday: Robert Freeman Wexler's Circus of the Grand Design, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Kim Wilkins's Giants of the Frost, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll
Thursday: Nisi Shawl and Cynthia Ward's Writing The Other: A Practical Approach, reviewed by Genevieve Williams

6/19/06

Great Ideas, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
"How," someone will ask me, "can such a large topic be contained in such a small book?" Thankfully, I can read the quote on the cover to my interlocutor.
My Termen, by Eliot Fintushel
Fiction.
Has not one experienced this with radio whine when one moves about the room, and the static shall sing? So my Termen already had observed in 1919 at Yoffee Institute, when he is inventing said instrument. This is one's theremin, what my Termen called ethervox or termenvox, voice of Termen.
Distant People Gravitate To Distant Worlds, by John Grey
Poetry.
the first footprint on strange worlds, / and sometimes the last.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Elizabeth Bear's Worldwired Trilogy, reviewed by Claire Brialey
Tuesday: Elizabeth Bear's Blood & Iron, reviewed by Steve Berman
Wednesday: Ian Watson's The Butterflies of Memory, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Thursday: Jon George's Zootsuit Black, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn

6/12/06

Gallery, by Douglas A. Sirois
Art.
Doug Sirois was born and raised in Massachusetts and learned to draw at an early age. As he got older he began reading and drawing his own comic books in the styles of his favorite artists.
Reading the Rhysling: 1980, by Greg Beatty
Article.
Once presented, the image seems so logical that it poses its own rhetorical question: why can't there be particles of darkness?
Dogtown, by Amanda Downum
Fiction.
She looked stretched tight too—something had her nervous, and it wasn't the killer across the table. Dark eyes flickered toward the window, and the night beyond.
A Feel for the Heavens, by Robert Frazier
Poetry.
often they have picked clean his ego and left him / hiking along the barren shores of physics
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Best. Franchise. EVAR: The Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Tuesday: Ian McDonald's River of Gods, reviewed by Mark Teppo
Wednesday: Charles Burns's Black Hole, reviewed by Justin Howe
Thursday: Geoff Ryman's The King's Last Song, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum

6/5/06

Coals in my Toes and Other Fears, by Scott Warner
Article.
It's a fact that sometimes firewalkers are burned. I'd read accounts. The real question is this: if their bare flesh comes in contact with red hot coals, why aren't they burned more often?
Fourteen Experiments in Postal Delivery, by John Schoffstall, illustration by Michael Ryan
Fiction.
I realize that these are traditional gestures of male romantic affection, and express a desire for forgiveness. They are not nearly enough. You are trying to melt the glacier of my anger with the Bic lighter of your contrition.
Abductee: Two Sonnets, by Ann K. Schwader
Poetry.
It started with her coffee—
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: One Million A.D., edited by Gardner Dozois, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Tuesday: Vernor Vinge's Rainbows End, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Wednesday: Fredric Jameson's Archaeologies of the Future, reviewed by John Garrison
Thursday: X-Men: The Last Stand, reviewed by Iain Clark

5/29/06

No Superheroes Allowed, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Is there really such a thing as a comic book or graphic novel that a) has no superheroes and b) is science fiction? There's more than you might think.
Textual Variants, by Rosamund Hodge
Fiction.
She couldn't even tell him the truth about why she felt weak. Because then she would have to tell him who the Warders really were, and who she was, and why she had spent the last three years fleeing across worlds and hunting for shards of the Crystal.
In All Probability, by K J Kirby
Poetry.
We always knew / we weren't the only world, not even / here in our own little system
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Ian R. MacLeod's The Summer Isles, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Tuesday: The Dedalus Book of Finnish Fantasy, reviewed by Rose Fox
Wednesday: Daniel Abraham's A Shadow In Summer, reviewed by David Soyka
Thursday: Farah Mendlesohn's Diana Wynne Jones: Children's Literature and the Fantastic Tradition, reviewed by Lesley A. Hall

5/22/06

Fortune's Food, by Kit St. Germain
Fiction.
"It's not just cards, Father. She reads your coffee grounds, your food. She sees things in the linguini. Right on your plate. She told me my gold chain was between the mattress and the headboard. In my linguini! Is that right?"
Virgo H121, by Deborah P Kolodji
Poetry.
A gas cloud spins its wheels / unable to form the stars / of sister galaxies
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Barth Anderson's The Patron Saint of Plagues, reviewed by Mark Teppo and Paul Kincaid
Tuesday: Simon Brown's Troy, reviewed by Ben Peek
Wednesday: Adam Roberts's Gradisil, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Thursday: Bruce Sterling's Visionary in Residence, reviewed by James A. Trimarco

5/15/06

Interview: James Patrick Kelly, by Victoria McManus
Article.
I started recording stories on cassette tape and giving them away as presents way back in the mid 'eighties. I am a big fan of spoken word fiction and do the greater part of my pleasure "reading" by listening to books from Audible.com.
Dispatches from Planet France: Me and the Giants (Part 2 of 2), by Susannah Mandel
Column.
For this reason I spent two and a half hours on a train, with a change at Brussels, for the pleasure of watching Goliath and his wife Madame Goliath parade through rainy Belgian streets under a looming sky.
Cinderella Suicide, by Samantha Henderson
Fiction.
Cinderella Suicide had the Whoremaster backed against the greasy-smooth wall of the Tarot, blade beneath his chins. She had that grinning-skull look that meant she didn't give a damn anymore.
The Glass Blower, by Karen A. Romanko
Poetry.
Inside the crystal sphere / in an identical wooden chamber / sits a glass blower, / completing a pretty vase
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Simon Ings's The Weight of Numbers, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Tuesday: Holly Phillips's The Burning Girl, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Carol Emshwiller's I Live With You, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Thursday: Tobias Buckell's Crystal Rain, reviewed by Donna Royston

5/8/06

A Conversation With a Puppeteer, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
As we sat drinking our coffee in the warm night, I inquired as to how long D. had been with the puppet company and if it was his ambition to become a master puppeteer.
We Are Never Where We Are, by Gavin J. Grant
Fiction.
In '36 in Spain, on the losing side, we realized we couldn't give more than we had. We'd almost given everything: you were in a field hospital with a bullet in your thigh and we were arguing over how deeply we should be involved. We'd already lived so long and I thought we should be more than just footpads serving time.
Fallen, by Sheree Ren�e Thomas
Poetry.
The night a comet / with its silver tail / tucked between its legs / fell through darkness
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Shadow of the Colossus, for Playstation 2, reviewed by Erin Hoffman
Tuesday: Philip Reeve's A Darkling Plain, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: The Encyclopedia of Fantastic Victoriana, reviewed by Tim Phipps
Thursday: Ken Macleod's The Highway Men, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn

5/1/06

Interview: Barth Anderson, by Darin C. Bradley
Article.
"I'm not big into binary morality — good versus evil, etc. — but it's hard not to look at that viral dance and see a classic face off, a sort of reverse Lord of the Rings with a lone, unliving microbe sneaking its evil way past the immune system in order to sabotage the good, pristine body."
The Water-Poet and the Four Seasons, by David J. Schwartz, illustration by Ann-Cathrine Loo
Fiction.
Spring stands at the Water-Poet's door in a top hat and tails. He asks the Water-Poet to write him a fog sestina, a dozen sudden downpours, and forty-three cool showers for tomorrow.
Taking Back the Moon, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
Real estate agents \ may notice a gap in the night sky.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Allen Steele's Coyote Trilogy, reviewed by Justin Howe
Tuesday: Alexandre Aja's The Hills Have Eyes, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu's Zahrah the Windseeker, reviewed by Genevieve Williams
Thursday: Liz Williams's Darkland, reviewed by Colin Harvey

4/24/06

Scare Tactics: Effectively Freaky Moments in Sci-Fi, by Stephanie V.W. Lucianovic
Column.
Then there was that one night when the individual pieces of the metal frame to my canopy bed (stored in the very roomy, person-sized space under my bed) clanged together and sent me screeching down the hall in my Strawberry Shortcake nightgown.
Love Goes Begging (Part 2 of 2), by Bennet H. Marks
Fiction.
Following the usual friendly preliminaries, I began to render service unto his urgently upright staff. Let me not suggest that this is an onerous task.
After Reading Stephen Hawking's Essays On a Nutshell-Shaped Universe, by Apryl Fox
Poetry.
Humankind, so small, they are tiny.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: L. Timmel Duchamp's The Red Rose Rages (Bleeding), reviewed by Lesley A. Hall
Tuesday: Ian R. Macleod's Past Magic, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Frances Hardinge's Fly by Night, reviewed by Donna Royston
Thursday: Conrad Williams's London Revenant, reviewed by Kelly Christopher Shaw

4/17/06

The Complete Miyazaki, Part 3, by James Schellenberg
Column.
I started this series last year, but I ran into an unexpected roadblock for this third installment.
Love Goes Begging (Part 1 of 2), by Bennet H. Marks
Fiction.
"Cupid! What a delightful surprise!" His wings had shrunk to quantum fluctuations, and his teeth were yellowed and cracked, like Scrabble tiles in some ancient runic language—Lemurian, or Old Norse.
Marble People, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
If marble people were / the world
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys, reviewed by Jasmine Johnston
Tuesday: Tony Ballantyne's Capacity, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Wednesday: James Morrow's The Last Witchfinder, reviewed by Farah Mendlesohn
Thursday: Kage Baker's The Children of the Company, reviewed by Colin Harvey

4/10/06

Visual Essays, by Ingrid Sundberg
Art.
Ingrid Sundberg grew up in Maine on the small island of Mount Desert. Surrounded by the ocean and forest, she began her appreciation of the connections between nature, spirituality, and art.
Interview: Douglas Lain, by Mahesh Raj Mohan
Article.
"My point of view is that humanity or American society has gotten off-track. We're coming upon a very destructive spiral. And I'm writing about reacting to that."
Every Angel Is Terrifying, by Nia Stephens
Fiction.
Sometime before he came to New York Reece flew through a windshield and landed on a knife of glass. We had all seen the scar during Reece's brief turn as a model in Life Drawing, compared it to the abdominal scars of Warhol and Basquiat. There were two other long, wide scars on either side of his spine. We almost envied him; as scars go, his were admirably aesthetic, and we believed that suffering was good for a young artist.
Stormland, by Elizabeth Barrette
Poetry.
I grew up / in a house made of clouds
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Write 'Em Until We Can't: Battlestar Galactica Lays Down Its Burdens, by Dan Hartland
Tuesday: Mark von Schlegel's Venusia, reviewed by Justin Howe
Wednesday: Jeffrey Ford's The Empire of Ice Cream, reviewed by Rose Fox
Thursday: Parietal Games: Critical Writings by and on M. John Harrison, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
2005 Reader's Choice Awards, by Susan Marie Groppi
Editorial.
Congratulations to all of the winners!

4/3/06

Reading the Rhysling: 1979, by Greg Beatty
Article.
Bishop's dance with Andrew Marvell and Stephen Hawking displays speculative poetry's bravura ambition.
Dispatches from Planet France: Me and the Giants (Part 1 of 2), by Susannah Mandel
Column.
You've come to live in a universe where giants in the wall are so familiar that nobody takes notice anymore.
The Los Angeles Women's Auxiliary Superhero League, by Elana Frink, illustration by Dylan Meconis
Fiction.
But no one sees Camille. She can't explain it, and she doesn't know why she's so sure that they don't see her, but there it is. She's invisible.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Silver Screen, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller
Tuesday: Mappa Mundi, reviewed by Nicholas Whyte
Wednesday: Natural History, reviewed by Tony Keen
Thursday: Living Next-Door to the God of Love, reviewed by Tanya Brown

3/27/06

Interview: Karen Traviss, by Cheryl Morgan
Article.
"I often say that I have a duty to tell the truth in fiction. Fiction is a very good way of getting under people's radar, which is why it's a spindoc favorite."
Do Matchmakers Dream of Estrogen Sheep?, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
Depending on my mood I think the description of a person dominated by testosterone fits me pretty well, too, although I know I only think that because, being made of estrogen, I'm flexible and imaginative.
Wayfaring Girls, by E. L. Chen
Fiction.
Phil rolled his eyes. "I know exactly where we're going. East of the sun and west of the moon, right?"
Parchment People, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
like the texts of old, / each of us would be a book
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Karl Schroeder's Lady of Mazes, reviewed by Ursula Pflug
Tuesday: V for Vendetta, reviewed by Iain Clark
Wednesday: Jay Lake's Rocket Science, reviewed by Rose Fox
Thursday: Kevin Brockmeier's The Brief History of the Dead, reviewed by Paul Kincaid

3/20/06

Colonizing The Moon, by Paul Lucas
Article.
However, not everyone is confident the ice will be able to be harvested as a useful resource. The temperature in the perpetual dark of those craters is hundreds of degrees below zero, making the ice steel-hard and razor-sharp.
The Flying Woman, by Meghan McCarron
Fiction.
The flying woman didn't fly above the clouds. "It's cold up there," she'd say, "and there's not enough air." She skimmed the roofs and treetops. Her legs dangled behind her, and she wore her wheelchair strapped to her back.
Spot in Space, by G. O. Clark
Poetry.
See Spot / gazing out the porthole / of his space capsule, looking / down at Dick and Jane
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Joe Hill's 20th Century Ghosts, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Tuesday: Jeff Vandermeer's Shriek: An Afterword, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: Sharyn November's Firebirds Rising, reviewed by C.M. Morrison
Thursday: Amber Benson and Christopher Golden's Ghosts of Albion: Accursed, reviewed by Nicholas Whyte

3/13/06

Gallery, by Limor Golan Nesher
Art.
My artistic vision is to create out of spirituality, knowing, and seeing. While I turn my imagination loose, I wander between Earth and other worlds.
An Ingenious Use of Scientific Patter: The Great War and the Science Fiction of H.G. Wells, by David M. Higgins
Article.
H. G. Wells himself, in many ways one of the founding fathers of modern science fiction, serves as a perfect model by which to view the effects of the war on the genre as a whole.
The Measure of a Woman: Discussing the Chicks of Star Trek: The Next Generation, by Stephanie V.W. Lucianovic
Column.
She's whiny, wimpy, sniffly, and, to top it all off, she's Wesley's mother. Is that not damning enough for you?
Towers, by Leah Bobet
Fiction.
She had felt strong enough to ramble the hills herself, to take up his sword, to defend and protect and be a guardian by his side. What had waiting been to that?
Stella Rosetta, by Yoon Ha Lee
Poetry.
No poem survives its own / translation.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Polder: A Festschrift for John Clute and Judith Clute, edited by Farah Mendlesohn, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Tuesday: Two Views: The Complete Calvin & Hobbes, reviewed by Juliana Froggatt and Mattia Valente
Wednesday: Y: The Last Man, reviewed by Jed Hartman
Thursday: Knowing Where To Look: The 2005 BSFA "Best Artwork" Award shortlist, by Pete Young

3/6/06

Sequels, Remakes, Adaptations, by James Schellenberg
Column.
One strategy in the face of overwhelming choice is to pick the familiar. So how do the different types of familiar stack up? With a bonus taxonomy.
The Purple Hippopotamus Wading Pool, by Joanne Merriam
Fiction.
Sherrie looked at him critically: dark hair, thin, tall, wedding band, nice suit. It was three o'clock in the afternoon on a Wednesday, and this was his fourth beer. Angela was sitting at his table, looking affordable.
Ajax Redux, by Bruce Boston and Marge Simon
Poetry.
I live in a land of ice / and mirth and explicit premise. / I'm starving, but I don't hunger / for your glittering glory.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Octavia E. Butler's Fledgling, reviewed by Rob Gates
Tuesday: David Marusek's Counting Heads, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Brian Aldiss's Cultural Breaks, reviewed by Mark Rich
Thursday: Bernard Cornwell's The Pale Horseman and Douglas Clegg's Mordred, Bastard Son, reviewed by Christopher M. Cevasco

2/27/06

Faery Cats: The Cutest Killers, by Lucy A. Snyder, artwork by D. E. Christman
Article.
Salinas says that, because of their invisibility, faery cats were left out of bestiaries and were often mistaken for other entities such as banshees, poltergeists, and boggarts.
Historians and Degenerates, by Joey Comeau
Fiction.
Who lives off the grid, anyway? Revolutionaries and criminals and historians.
Cherries for Buttons, by Joanne Merriam
Poetry.
I woke for a woman all tooth and whispered want. Like the oven she was / warm when met and cold when done.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Naomi Novik's His Majesty's Dragon, reviewed by Rose Fox
Tuesday: Eric Brown's The Extraordinary Voyage of Jules Verne, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Wednesday: Richard Paul Russo's The Rosetta Codex, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Thursday: Lydia Millet's Oh Pure and Radiant Heart, reviewed by Ben Peek

2/20/06

Dispatches from Planet France: My Personal North, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
Last year, I kept overhearing my students in making jokes involving the number 62. I spent a long time puzzling over the possible meaning of this (pot joke? teen film? some French interpretation of a Kama Sutra position?) before it was explained to me that it was actually a post code.
Ignis Fatuus, by Eliani Torres
Fiction.
Catherine closed her eyes and stretched, throwing her head back and crossing her wrists high above her head. She reminded him again of a barely tamed feline, a leashed snow tiger, the old breeds of grimalkin.
Sweets, by Mary Alexandra Agner
Poetry.
must we smile, must we thank her / even though she never gives us sweets?
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Doug Lain's Last Week's Apocalypse, reviewed by Matthew Cheney
Tuesday: Maurice Dantec's Babylon Babies, reviewed by James A. Trimarco
Wednesday: George Zebrowski's Macrolife: A Mobile Utopia, reviewed by Justin Howe
Thursday: Electroplankton, for Nintendo DS, reviewed by Erin Hoffman

2/13/06

Gallery, by Gil Formosa
Art.
Smoothly morphing his skill and experience, artist Gil Formosa shape-shifts from animation to comics, cartoon to realistic, illustration to art direction.
Reading the Rhysling: Introduction, by Greg Beatty
Article.
[T]here is one area that has heretofore been neglected, and that is a systematic reading of the poems which science fiction poets have designated as superior.
Reading the Rhysling: 1978, by Greg Beatty
Article.
Rhysling's vision stands as a metaphor for all science fiction poetry, and perhaps for all science fiction: we write in verse what we cannot see with our eyes.
My Window Is Your Mirror, My Mirror Is Your Wall, My Wall Is Your Window, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
I am at this particular moment working from the assumption that you understand the majority of what I am writing here. I am, then, assuming that most of these sentences are accessible. To do that, I have to make some assumptions about my audience.
The Desires of Houses, by Haddayr Copley-Woods
Fiction.
The cord over the washing machine, the braided one, is waiting joyously for the teeth.
Summoning, by Tim Jones
Poetry.
the lighting of a candle / and the speaking of a name
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Jeanette Winterson's Weight and Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Tuesday: Jeffrey Ford's The Cosmology of the Wider World, reviewed by Tony Keen
Wednesday: Catherynne M. Valente's Oracles: A Pilgrimage, reviewed by J.C. Runolfson
Thursday: Catherynne M. Valente's Yume No Hon: The Book of Dreams, reviewed by Niall Harrison

2/6/06

Michael's Spyglass: An Interview with Mike Coney, by C. June Wolf
Article.
"I think that [writing] has taught me always to be completely honest with the reader and never allow myself to take the easy way out for the sake of glib plot device."
Wrack, by Amanda Downum, illustration by Matt Hughes
Fiction.
It took a second to recognize the low sound she made as laughter. "I need the sea." Her voice was rough, sibilant; the sound made Jess shiver.
A Story for Winter, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
The snow is deeper now and we cannot / get out
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Janine Cross's Touched by Venom, reviewed by Liz Henry
Tuesday: Life on Mars, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Wednesday: The Alchemy of Stars: Rhysling Award Winners Showcase, reviewed by Elizabeth Barrette
Thursday: Martin Sketchley's The Affinity Trap, reviewed by Mahesh Raj Mohan

1/30/06

Cooking Without a Replicator, by Stephanie V.W. Lucianovic
Column.
I think I was hoping for something along the lines of a necessary addition of roasted chicory, raw meat drippings, or even refined mud to make it truly Klingon.
Portrait of Ari, by Mary Robinette Kowal
Fiction.
Ari looked up from the mat she was cutting. "So the secret to getting you to dance is sleep deprivation?"
At the Dump, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
chanted portions of the 1957 / Chevy Owner's Manual / to summon a virgin.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Scalpels and Surgical Masks: A Review of the Aurealis Awards Short Fiction Finalists, by Ben Peek
Tuesday: Terry Bisson's Numbers Don't Lie, reviewed by Nicholas Whyte
Wednesday: Jon Courtenay Grimwood's 9Tail Fox, reviewed by Mark Teppo
Thursday: Steph Swainston's No Present Like Time, reviewed by Donna Royston

1/23/06

Regeneration: The Return of Doctor Who, by Alasdair Stuart
Article.
Why is the series a success now when it was viewed as a failure sixteen years ago?
Small Press Roundup, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Looking for some of the best short stories and new material in the field? Try these small presses.
Estrangement, by Kit St. Germain
Fiction.
Her eyes widened in comprehension. "Ohhh. Gotcha. That would be Hamish or Vera. The parentals. They are always into things. They don't always know what they're into. What's the song do? Does it make sure that someone guards their daughter in case ravening Americans get her?"
The Journey to Kailash, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
I tell him I know a doctor / who can do something about that nose.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Lou Anders's Futureshocks, reviewed by Mahesh Raj Mohan
Tuesday: M.P. Shiel's The House of Sounds, reviewed by Greg Beatty
Wednesday: Scott Mackay's Tides, reviewed by Justin Howe
Thursday: Dale Bailey's The Resurrection Man's Legacy, reviewed by Colin Harvey

1/16/06

Interview: Lydia Millet, by Matthew Cheney
Article.
"I do think more Americans should read and educate themselves, to say nothing of engage in politics, and I do believe that if they don't take a more trenchant interest soon we're all doomed; but sadly, fiction is not going to save us from doom."
Listening, by Christina Socorro Yovovich
Column.
You haven't seen awkward until you've seen me washing dishes with a bookstand teetering on the edge of the sink, or folding laundry with a paperback held open by my toes.
The Machine, by Joey Comeau
Fiction.
A scientist (me) and a priest (David) walk into a bar, ten years before either of us are born, looking for a miracle.
The Dream Factory: Two Tours, by Duane Ackerson
Poetry.
the dream completer software / massages the story line / and develops alternate dreamlines.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Christopher Priest: The Interaction, reviewed by John Clute
Tuesday: Two Views: Doctor Who, "The Christmas Invasion", reviewed by Graham Sleight and Tim Phipps
Wednesday: Vera Nazarian's The Clock King and the Queen of the Hourglass, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Thursday: Tim Pratt's The Strange Adventures of Rangergirl, reviewed by Kelly Christopher Shaw

1/9/06

Gallery, by Patrick McEvoy
Art.
My biggest single influence is probably Jim Steranko—as a comics artist of course, but mostly as a cover illustrator. Luckily, or maybe not, I don't seem to have ended up with a style that looks too much like any of my favorite artists.
Dispatches from Planet France: Curiosities and Wonders, by Susannah Mandel
Column.
And, not least, there was that morbid, embarrassed adolescent curiosity: What do the French really think of Americans? Do they like us? Do they think we're cool? Immature? Were they even following what went on with that freedom fries debacle? How do we look, from all the way over there?
The Girl with the Heart of Stone, by Leah Bobet
Fiction.
"I am going to seek the Beast in the wilderness," she told him. "I am going to win my own heart back, by force, by wit, or by sacrifice."
SETI Hits Pay Dirt, by David C. Kopaska-Merkel
Poetry.
We have come, gods be spoken / between packing and material (?)
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Insert Your Lost Pun Here: Is ABC's Ratings Phenomenon Losing Its Way? by Abigail Nussbaum
Tuesday: Paul McAuley's Little Machines, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Aeon Flux, reviewed by Neil Anderson
Thursday: Karen L. Newman's Eeku, reviewed by Donna Royston

1/2/06

Surfing Hell at Mach Twenty-Five: The Science and Speculation of Atmospheric Reentry, by Paul Lucas
Article.
Getting into orbit can seem relatively straight-forward compared to screaming through burning layers of atmosphere at over two dozen times the speed of sound just to return home.
The Art of Entertainment, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
I've worked as a writer, director, and actor in plays for most of my life, and so three things can make me suffer while watching a show: the writing, directing, and acting.
Water, Fire, and Faith, by S. Evans
Fiction.
It's dark as ashes where she swims, her way lit only by the bioluminescent patches on her tail, fingers, and toes.
Swans Take Flight at My Father's Grave, by Scott Hughes
Poetry.
Put down this poem, / see it now: the black hole / stretching like a mouth
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: 2005 In Review, by Our Reviewers
Tuesday: Fiona Avery's The Crown Rose, reviewed by Genevieve Williams
Wednesday: Gardner Dozois's Galileo's Children, reviewed by Tim Gebhart
Thursday: Of Mice and Gender: The best-laid plans of Battlestar Galactica, by Dan Hartland

12/19/05

The Turtle Can't Help Us: The Lovecraft Legacy in Stephen King's It, by Margaret L. Carter
Article.
Although King, in It, overlays Lovecraft's cosmology with a dualistic world-view, he permits no outside force to rescue his heroes; but neither does he, like Lovecraft, attribute their escape to blind chance.
The Taste of Chicory at High Tide, by Lisa Mantchev
Fiction.
When a blues-singin' hoodoo-slingin' mistress calls, a man's got to reply.
Tales of the Chinese Zodiac: Goat, by Jenn Reese
Fiction.
It came as a surprise to no one except Yuhan himself that, in the Year of the Goat, he fell in love with one.
Chess People, by Bruce Boston
Poetry.
Some women would be queens, / both swift and extreme / in their influence.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Gary Westfahl's Science Fiction Quotations, reviewed by Jeremy Adam Smith
Tuesday: Terry Pratchett's Thud!, reviewed by Juliana Froggatt
Wednesday: Liz Williams's The Snake Agent, reviewed by David Soyka
Thursday: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe, reviewed by Neil Anderson

12/12/05

Gallery, by Matthew Laznicka
Art.
Matthew feels that his style captures a depth not only of his persona, but portrays eras that have always captured his soul.
Interview: Nicola Griffith, by Lynne Jamneck
Article.
I lived in Hull . . . surrounded by people who in that time and place were considered the dregs of society: bikers, drug dealers, prostitutes, dykes, the terminally unemployed and unemployable. I starved and begged and did all the other things that one does to survive, and after a few years managed to drag myself free and onto my current super-respectable path.
Bone Women, by Eliot Fintushel
Fiction.
So fucking vulnerable and frank she was, the bitch, the innocent, it aroused in me, like a piano string, willy-nilly, humming back to the tuning fork its A-440, an answering emotion. Which I duly quashed. Don't they know, goddammit, that they're supposed to suck it up and amble on? It's a man's world, haven't they heard? I don't like feeling.
Where Elevator Music Comes From, by Thomas D. Reynolds
Poetry.
how resilient, yet how vulnerable, they have evolved
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: The Year's Best Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy, Volume 1, reviewed by Ian McHugh
Tuesday: Rosaleen Love's The Travelling Tide, reviewed by Lesley A. Hall
Wednesday: Michael Cunningham's Specimen Days, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Thursday: Two Views: Ken Macleod's Learning the World, reviewed by Niall Harrison and Dan Hartland

12/5/05

Interview: L. E. Modesitt, by Cheryl Morgan
Article.
"From what I've seen in politics there are only two things that change the way things are. One is power . . . and the other is blood."
Untwitched: Games for the Rest of Us, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Are there any videogames for smart grown-ups? Anything for people without twitchy trigger fingers?
Intelligent Design, by Ellen Klages, illustration by Turner Davis
Fiction.
Nanadeus rolled out a sheet of clay while she waited for God to come in out of the void. Now that there was fire, there was much to be done. Systems and cycles and chains of being to set in place. And the oceans, which had turned out to be a little tricky.
Daughters, by Suzanne Burns
Poetry.
As murder chimed with the clockworks / you confessed to thumbing fashions
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Maureen F. McHugh's Mothers and Other Monsters, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Tuesday: Michael Blumlein's The Healer, reviewed by Lori Ann White
Wednesday: Anne Sheldon's The Adventures of the Faithful Counselor, reviewed by Donna Royston
Thursday: Jeffrey Allen Tucker's A Sense of Wonder: Samuel R. Delany, Race, Identity and Difference, reviewed by Greg Beatty

11/28/05

Interview: Greg Pak, by Gwenda Bond
Article.
"The script has to work for the finished film to work—it's incredibly difficult to correct major structural story flaws on set."
Tall Jorinda, by Marly Youmans
Fiction.
"My beauty," he said, "you've got hair enough to stuff a mattress, you've got eyes like saucers, eyelashes like wheel spokes, brows like cane thickets. If you tripped, you'd cause earthquakes in California, tidal waves in Japan. Catamounts and grizzlies, Indian tigers and giant pandas should be your pets."
The Bones of the Tale, by Neile Graham
Poetry.
I read her bones like oracles
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Greg Pak's Robot Stories and More Screenplays, reviewed by Gwenda Bond
Tuesday: Graham Joyce's The Limits of Enchantment, reviewed by Lynda E. Rucker
Wednesday: L. Timmel Duchamp's Alanya to Alanya, reviewed by Matthew L. Moffett
Thursday: Alexander C. Irvine's The Narrows, reviewed by Kelly Christopher Shaw

11/21/05

Arctic Fabulous: Speculative Fiction and the Imaginary Arctic, by Siobhan Carroll
Article.
Even today, you can find conspiracy theorists who believe that the Arctic harbors alien spacecraft, for example, or that an international military alliance has covered up the existence of a tropical island at the South Pole.
In Borderlands Between the Clans, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
The worlds of popular fiction and literary fiction often look with jealousy and annoyance at each other.
Bearing Witness (Part 2 of 2), by Marguerite Reed
Fiction.
"You show me a cosmonaut who doesn't have nightmares, you're showing me someone with no imagination. We all have 'em, we just don't talk about it."
Tales of the Chinese Zodiac: Horse, by Jenn Reese
Fiction.
The little mare shook her head like a child shaking off sleep, and pranced on his palm with her painted hooves.
Symbiosis, by K. J. Kirby
Poetry.
The cold hard hearts of gods / despise / the lickspittle loyalty of dogs
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Naomi Mitchison's Travel Light, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Tuesday: Orson Welles's Dracula, reviewed by J.M. Comeau
Wednesday: Francesca Lia Block's The Rose and the Best, reviewed by J.C. Runolfson
Thursday: Robert Charles Wilson's Spin, reviewed by Mark Teppo

11/14/05

Gallery, by Stephanie Rodriguez
Art.
Stephanie Rodriguez is an award-winning illustrator. Creating art is her passion in life!
Interview: Jane Yolen, by Mike Allen
Article.
"I don't sit around defining my poetic leanings. But I have read a lot of folklore, which redefines the way I see the world...[o]r underlines it anyway."
Table for Two at Sisko's: Eating Deep Space Nine, by Stephanie V.W. Lucianovic
Column.
I'm sorry, but if an embryonic Clint Howard is going to kit himself out in sparkly go-go boots and pants and start reclining on silky pillows, when he offers me a drink, it sure as HELL better be chock-full of mind-erasing alcohol!
Bearing Witness (Part 1 of 2), by Marguerite Reed
Fiction.
The biohazard bag floated by her knee. She pushed the pipettes in and zipped it shut. "Twenty more to go, and I don't have to run an experiment to tell you they'll turn out nonviable."
Tiger Lily Madness, by Cat Rambo
Poetry.
Tiger lilies for me, their petals dusted with black pollen / Like a moth's shadow
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Tricia Sullivan's Double Vision, reviewed by Claire Brialey
Tuesday: Jonathan Strahan's Best Short Novels: 2005, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Wednesday: Mirrormask, reviewed by Alex Saltman
Thursday: Night Watch, reviewed by Liz Batty

11/7/05

Scared Shitless: How to Rate the Creep-Out Factor in the Horror Film Genre, by Dr. Deems D. Morrione and Robert K. Morrione
Article.
... [W]e would argue that the key to understanding Creep-Out factors lies in unknowability. The less you understand something, the greater potential it has to frighten you.
Science Fiction and Sex Ed, by Christina Socorro Yovovich
Column.
Smuggling the book out of my bag. Passing it, with a couple of dog-eared pages, to a friend. Seeing her read, then pass it along to someone else.
Adventures in Dog-Walking in Downtown Philadelphia, by John Schoffstall, illustration by Ingrid Sundberg
Fiction.
"Mom, I think there's a DVD player in your fish tank."
from FRANK, by CAConrad
Poetry.
after Mother / died her red / dress continued / baking pies
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Geoff Ryman's Air, reviewed by Geneva Melzack and Iain Emsley
Tuesday: Encounters: An Anthology of Australian Speculative Fiction, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Nova Scotia: New Scottish Speculative Fiction, reviewed by Martin Lewis
Thursday: Doom, reviewed by Neil Anderson

10/31/05

Barfing Your Guts Out: Horror Films and the Gross-Out Scale, by Dr. Deems D. Morrione and Robert K. Morrione
Article.
If a Horror film fails to gross you out or scare you because you aren't seduced by its presentation, why watch it?
Star Wars Video Games: Better Than the Movies?, by James Schellenberg
Column.
The movie is never better than the book; further down the foodchain, the video game is never better than the movie. Right? But consider the case of Star Wars.
The Moon Is Always Full, by Charles Coleman Finlay
Fiction.
"You remember what Ralph used to say?" Martin asked. "We'd go outside and look at the moon, when it was just a half moon, and I'd ask him 'Is that moon half full or half empty?'"
When you left your body lying around, by Keyan Bowes
Poetry.
The face in the mirror was more familiar than my own
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Wallace and Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Tuesday: Charles Coleman Finlay's The Prodigal Troll, reviewed by Genevieve Williams
Wednesday: Richard Bowes's From The Files of the Time Rangers, reviewed by Mark Rich
Thursday: Fantasy Magazine #1, reviewed by Pam McNew

10/24/05

So, Your Utopia Needs a Language..., by Tristan Davenport
Article.
Modern linguists agree that the notion of one language being more efficient or more expressive than another is pretty much hokum.
The Featherless Chicken, by Patrick Scott Vickers
Fiction.
It's hard enough to pluck a chicken when the feathers are on the outside, but the other way around is simply impossible. Harriet's chicken is a Total Failure.
John Travolta Stars in My Flick, by Earl J. Wilcox
Poetry.
I ask him: / Why are we drinking out of paper cups, anyway? I need / to know.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: China Miéville's Looking for Jake, reviewed by Kelly Christopher Shaw
Tuesday: W. Warren Wagar's H. G. Wells: Traversing Time, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Wednesday: Tim Burton's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, reviewed by Lori Ann White
Thursday: The American Astronaut, reviewed by Justin Howe

10/17/05

Interview: Holly Phillips, by David Lynton
Article.
"The big presses are too conservative; the small presses are increasingly taking up the slack and publishing the more innovative or daring material, not to mention the new writers."
Fantastic Reality, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
A genre that must make room for Kafka and Beckett and Dostoevsky is perhaps no longer a genre but merely a definition of writing successfully.
Rapunzel Dreams of Knives, by Beth Adele Long
Fiction.
"Do you want to go? His country is truly beautiful. Though it's awfully cold and the men are said to be unusually brutish."
Tales of the Chinese Zodiac: Snake, by Jenn Reese
Fiction.
It continued like this for almost two months. Jin-Hua opened the pouch to feed the snake, and it hissed a vile curse involving her, her loved ones, and immense torture and discomfort.
The Greening, by Joanne Merriam
Poetry.
we know the sound / and see their footsteps' deep blue shadows and their occasional bodies
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Two Views: Serenity, reviewed by Mahesh Raj Mohan and Niall Harrison
Tuesday: Zoran Zivkovic's Hidden Camera, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Jonathan Cowie and Tony Chester's Essential SF: A Concise Guide, reviewed by James Palmer
Thursday: A Tale of Two Sisters, reviewed by Lynda E. Rucker

10/10/05

Beaming Into a Television Near You: The Fall 2005 Sci-Fi Lineup, by Stephanie V.W. Lucianovic
Column.
There seems to be a steaming molten mass of monster and science fiction shows this fall. For a long time, it was really confusing. I mean, they all sounded very much alike.
They Fight Crime!, by Leah Bobet
Fiction.
Jack and Terri spend their nights off in the back of a '75 Caddy, fighting crime.
Also Sprach Fred, by Gary Lehmann
Poetry.
my brother-in-law posed as Fred Nietzsche on a trans-Atlantic flight
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Holly Phillips's In the Palace of Repose, reviewed by Yoon Ha Lee
Tuesday: Enki Bilal's The Nikopol Trilogy, reviewed by Mark Teppo
Wednesday: The 4400, reviewed by Selila Honig
Thursday: Lois McMaster Bujold's The Hallowed Hunt, reviewed by Greg Beatty

10/3/05

We Must Love One Another or Die: A Critique of Star Wars, by Athena Andreadis
Article.
Just as the boys in Star Wars are given the false choice between glory or love, the girls are given the thankless task of being feisty but unthreatening, without any guarantee of clemency for good behavior.
Failing to Teach The Hobbit, by Christina Socorro Yovovich
Column.
Instead, what I'm remembering are lessons I botched, and units which failed before they started, because I didn't have the slightest idea what I was trying to teach.
Pip and the Fairies, by Theodora Goss, illustration by Susan Moore
Fiction.
This is the sort of thing people like: the implication that, despite their minivans and microwaves, if they found the door in the wall, they too could enter fairyland.
The Strip Search, by Mike Allen
Poetry.
I thought I'd tossed all my hope away, / but when I stepped through the Gate, it still pinged.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Scott Westerfield's Peeps, reviewed by John Joseph Adams
Tuesday: Howl's Moving Castle, reviewed by Laura Blackwell
Wednesday: Chris Roberson's Here, There & Everywhere, reviewed by Mahesh Raj Mohan
Thursday: The Lost Generation: Threshold, Surface, and Invasion, reviewed by Mattia Valente

9/26/05

Interview: Judith Berman, by Victoria McManus
Article.
"Evoking the sense of wonder is also important in both SF and fantasy. But they part company in where you find it."
Why I Hate Zombies, by James Schellenberg
Column.
Well, for one, they're the living dead. And secondly, they show up in way too many computer games.
Severance Pay, by M. K. Hobson
Fiction.
I didn't apply for the job. You don't see "Angel of Death" in the want ads.
Summoning Stones, by Jennifer Crow
Poetry.
I call the pebbles / broken by ice, / smoothed by water and time.
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Judith Berman's Bear Daughter, reviewed by Jane Acheson
Tuesday: Battlestar Galactica, season two: the opening quartet, reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Paul Park's A Princess of Roumania, reviewed by Kat Jong
Thursday: Lego Star Wars, reviewed by Tim Phipps

9/19/05

Equations and Inequalities, by Debbie Notkin
Column.
Even in its more twisted versions, the cold equation always results in the death of one person or group to save the lives or honor of another person or group
Exception (Part 2 of 2), by Jason Stoddard
Fiction.
But Arcadia couldn't be destroyed. It ran on its own set of self-replicating nanoscale processors that blew on the wind until they found a place with sun and silicon and set about reproducing.
Tales of the Chinese Zodiac: Dragon, by Jenn Reese
Fiction.
In the Year of the Dragon, Kwong found a glittering scale by the well and brought it home to his wife, for it reminded him of the sea.
Some Houseguests Can't Be Helped, by Peg Duthie
Poetry.
Aunt Marybelle being Unitarian, see, / and thus already well-versed / in unnatural ways with peanut butter
Reviews for the week of
Review.
Monday: Doctor Who 2005: a feature-length review by Graham Sleight
Tuesday: Kelly Link's Magic for Beginners reviewed by Geneva Melzack
Wednesday: Byron de Prorok's Dead Men Do Tell Tales reviewed by Justin Howe
Thursday: Kate Wilhelm's Storyteller reviewed by Greg Beatty
The Big Picture, by Susan Marie Groppi
Editorial.
Movies, comic books, anime, video games, music, television shows, poetry—if it's out there and it's got some speculative content, we want to be reviewing it here at Strange Horizons.

9/12/05

Provocateurs of Sense, by Matthew Cheney
Column.
But the wonder of Seligman's book is that he is able to think about the two writers together, to discover their commonalities without ignoring their differences, to celebrate their achievements without blinding himself to their faults.
Exception (Part 1 of 2), by Jason Stoddard
Fiction.
Something had reached through her memories, sending tendrils of thought from deep in her past to her present. As if another mind had tried to force itself into hers.
Son of an Astronaut, by John Grey
Poetry.
Now, everything gathers dust

9/5/05

The Ten Stupidest Utopias!, by Jeremy Adam Smith
Article.
We dream our fears as well as hopes, reflecting all the agonies and contradictions of the waking world; in dreams, demons rise from our darkest places.
A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread, and ... UFOs?, by Stephanie V.W. Lucianovic
Column.
Honestly, I didn't think Sci-Fi imagery was becoming such a "thing" with wine makers until I was browsing through a San Diego Trader Joe's and stumbled upon a bottle of Red Flyer table wine from Soledad, California.
Crow's Changeling, by Sarah Prineas
Fiction.
"I've come for the child," he said.
Swan Fetish, by Erin Donahoe