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Contents

29 August 2016

[Fiction by Rokheya Shekhawat Hossein]

(Fiction)

FICTION: Sultana's Dream, by Rokheya Shekhawat Hossein

Some of the passers-by made jokes at me. Though I could not understand their language, yet I felt sure they were joking. I asked my friend, "What do they say?" "The women say that you look very mannish." "Mannish?" said I, "What do they mean by that?" "They mean that you are shy and timid like men."

FICTION: Fifty Years in the Virtuous City, by Leo Mandel

At close range she can be seen to be shaking, a hard tight focused trembling, not confined to the hands. She looks close to resonant frequency. Amrita wants to, somehow, by touching her with one finger perhaps, strike her unconscious, into some kind of healing sleep.

ARTICLE: "That Obsessive Recursiveness": An Interview with Leo Mandel, by Leo Mandel and Seth Dickinson

That attraction/repulsion thing with vulnerability again, I can mark out an author who came from fandom a mile away. Weight in small gestures, terror, gentleness.

ARTICLE: Tomorrow Through the Past: Jo Walton and Ada Palmer in Conversation, by Ada Palmer and Jo Walton

It's interesting to me that people instantly try to categorize this future into "utopia" or "dystopia" because we don't really have a category for "pretty good future with some flaws."

FICTION: Podcast: Sultana's Dream, by Rokheya Shekhawat Hossein, read by Anaea Lay

In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Rokheya Shekhawat Hossein's "Sultana's Dream."

FICTION: Podcast: Fifty Years in the Virtuous City, by Leo Mandel, read by Anaea Lay

In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Leo Mandel's "Fifty Years in the Virtuous City."

POETRY: Podcast: August Poetry, by Kayla Bashe, Brandon O'Brien, Karen Weyant, and Shweta Narayan, read by Ciro Faienza, Romie Stott, and Shweta Narayan

In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Ciro Faienza presents poetry from the August issues.

EDITORIAL: The Next Horizon, by Niall Harrison

The report published earlier this month by Fireside magazine, which found that of 2,039 original stories published by 63 SF magazines in 2015, only 38 were by black authors, indicates an unambiguous failure on the part of the SF field and, because we know our own numbers and they're in the spreadsheet accompanying the report, an unambiguous failure on the part of Strange Horizons.

REVIEW: This Week's Reviews

Monday: The Explorers Guild Volume One: A Passage to Shambhala by Kevin Costner, Jon Baird, and Rick Ross, reviewed by Aishwarya Subramanian
Wednesday: Star Trek Beyond, reviewed by Tim Phipps
Friday: Too Like The Lightning by Ada Palmer, reviewed by Paul Kincaid


22 August 2016

[Reviews ]

(Reviews)

ARTICLE: Boucher, Backbone and Blake – the legacy of Blakes 7, by Erin Horáková

Almost no other show, genre or otherwise, is as well-written as Blakes 7...I want people who enjoy, talk about and make art to know where the good shit is and where the bar should be set.

POETRY: To my Shyaam, by Shweta Narayan

Dancing child, poison-turner, lifter / of mountaintops, not even Kaliya / could carry your weight.

COLUMN: Scores, by John Clute

When we look into the mirror pastwards, we seem to see cliffs and panoplies of loved story carking at us wordfully in our wake Remember Me! Remember Me!

REVIEW: This Week's Reviews

Monday: The 2016 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist, Part 1, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Wednesday: The 2016 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist, Part 2, reviewed by Abigail Nussbaum
Friday: The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories by Ken Liu, reviewed by K. Kamo


15 August 2016

[Reviews ]

(Reviews)

FICTION: In Our Rags of Light, by Shira Lipkin

If there's one thing halfass swamprat mystics like better than a girl on their lap while they're holding forth regarding the tiny scraps of the numinous they’ve managed to catch sight of, it's a girl waiting on them.

FICTION: Podcast: In Our Rags of Light, by Shira Lipkin, read by Anaea Lay

In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Shira Lipkin's "In Our Rags of Light."

ARTICLE: Artist Interview: Melissa Pagluica, by Tory Hoke

Even as a kid I was always trying to create worlds and stories with my art.

POETRY: To the Girl Who Ran Through Crop Circles, by Karen J. Weyant

You never shy away from the sudden shapes / that appear shorn in the fields, // waves of stalks woven into circles and split spheres.

REVIEW: This Week's Reviews

Monday: Codex Ocularis by Ian Pyper, reviewed by Nathaniel Forsythe
Wednesday: Simultaneous Worlds: Global Science Fiction Cinema, ed. by Jennifer L Feeley and Sarah Ann Wells, reviewed by Salik Shah
Friday: Peripheral Visions: Collected Ghost Stories of Robert Hood, reviewed by Shannon Fay


8 August 2016

[Fiction by Alena Indigo Anne Sullivan]

(Fiction)

FICTION: Gorse Daughter, Sparrow Son (Part 2 of 2), by Alena Indigo Anne Sullivan

Jocelyn’s mother grew weak and died when she was only a few months old; Jocelyn spent the rest of her childhood years at the skirts of one fairy or another, trying desperately to learn all the things her mother hadn’t had time to teach her.

FICTION: Podcast: Gorse Daughter, Sparrow Son (Part 2 of 2), by Alena Indigo Anne Sullivan, read by Anaea Lay

In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents Alena Indigo Anne Sullivan's "Gorse Daughter, Sparrow Son."

COLUMN: Me and Science Fiction: The Marvel Project, by Eleanor Arnason

At this point the Marvel project includes 12 movies that are out, plus 8 more planned or in production. . . . So what are these movies about? What is their appeal?

POETRY: population changes, by Brandon O'Brien

an android can win an arms race / but a black boy can't.

REVIEW: This Week's Reviews

Monday: A Daughter of No Name by A.M. Dellamonica, reviewed by A.S. Moser
Wednesday: Preacher,reviewed by Nia Wearn
Friday: Our Lady of the Ruins by Traci Brimhall, reviewed by Octavia Cade



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